Is Our Writing Improving?

How can we measure writing so students, parents, the community, and the teachers know that students are improving?

If this is our definition of assessment, we have many options for measurement.

writing assessment

If I am a student, I can use rubrics, checklists, my personal goals and feedback from peers, teachers,  and those I communicate with through blogging, etc. to talk about what qualities are present in my writing now that were not there earlier in the year.  This could be in the form of a summative reflection that is posted with two or three papers/writings that I believe demonstrate my growth and that I would have annotated with those specific qualities for a quarter or semester or across the entire year.

But what keeps a student writing on a daily basis?  How does a student know that this week’s writing piece is better than the last piece?  Or that this piece really was the perfect match for the audience and purpose?  I believe that students need feedback to not only be able to “improve” their writing but also to have the language to explain what they are doing to others. Excitement about a topic can carry a student for several days, but at some point the enthusiasm may wane as the task of rewriting or revising becomes laborious.

John Hattie believes that feedback needs to include these factors:

“• focus on the learning intention of the task
• occur as the students are doing the learning
• provide information on how and why the student understands and misunderstands
• provides strategies to help the student to improve
• assist the student to understand the goals of the learning”  Source 

So a learner would need to know the task/goal, be able to explain what he or she is learning and have some strategies that enhance his/her understanding of the work.  The checklists in the new Units of Study in Writing, from Lucy Calkins and the many, many talented folks at Teachers College Reading and Writing, would help meet those criteria especially if the students are involved in daily writing workshops that allow them to continually stretch and grow and there is a safety net provided by the teacher and peers.

Is this the only writing format that meets these criteria?  No, other rubrics such as 6 Traits + 1 within a writing workshop model could also set up this learning and feedback environment for students.  These environments would include clear writing targets, models and strategies for students to continually plan, reflect and self-assess.  When working well, these classrooms are better than well-oiled machines; when not working well students might be saying, “I don’t know what to write.” or  “What do YOU want me to write?”

How does that all fit in a writing workshop?  Very, very carefully as a teacher combines both student-led and teacher-led activities to increase student independence!  At the end of the mini-lesson, the teacher may ask the students to go ahead and begin an example of the task/work at hand before they even leave that comfort of the writing circle.  A few students may stay for a quick conference and/or a more specific “check-in” with the teacher.  A student may have put a post it up on a strategy chart to mark the specific work that is his/her goal for today that will improve the narrative (adding action, adding dialogue, or adding thoughts).  The teacher will circulate and may have a “mid-workshop” interruption where student work that is “on target” is quickly celebrated and shared.  Students may quickly meet with writing partners to see if they are “still on course to meet their goals.”

This is an example of “knowing specifically what a student needs to do” to meet the learning target in kindergarten – first grade writing.

K end of unit one writing

The student will have a “collection” of writings in a folder that will be evidence of learning.

What will the parents and community members see?  They will see examples of early writing in a unit and later writing.  They will see “student revision” in work and evidence of student thinking.  Parents and community members will not see traditional “percentages” for grades.  They will see comments that delineate what the student CAN do.  The students will be able to tell their families what they have been working on and how that has helped them be more powerful writers.

And the teachers . . . How will they know that “students are improving”?  Teachers may have to take a step back because the “day to day work” may cloud their view when they think of overall growth for all students. But student growth, when students are writing every day in writing workship for 45 minutes to an hour, can be seen after three weeks (Lucy Calkins, June 2013 TCRWP Writing Institute).  Will it be easy?  Heck, no!  But will easy provide results that will help your students meet the demands of opinion, informational and narrative writing?

What are you waiting for?  February is the month to “Fire Up” student writing in your classroom.  Your students will love writing with you!

What questions do you have?  What do you need in order to get started?

Information about the K-5 Units of Study

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8 responses

  1. Fran,

    Great questions! Here is one I’ve been going back and forth on: When I ask a student to reflect on what they have accomplished and what they need to work on, what is best to look at – on demands or workshop published pieces? I have had them use their published works for reflection and their on demands for assessment of my teaching. Hmmm… What do you think? I suppose when students are tested they are evaluated on the on demand work. But, as a writer, I would rather evaluate the work that I spent some time and energy polishing, not on a piece that I had a limited amount of time to craft.

    Julieanne

    1. Julieanne,
      Great question. I would probably do both. I would base the daily reflection on the workshop work. Then once a week at first and maybe later every two weeks, I would have them consider “What have I learned to do really well?” And then have them discuss the on-demand with their writing partner and talk about “How would I do this differently now?”

      My thinking: It would give them another practice when looking at their own writing and would be another “application” check for me to see how well they are applying across multiple written pieces.

      Does that make sense?

  2. […] How can we measure writing so students, parents, the community, and the teachers know that students are improving? If this is our definition of assessment, we have many options for measurement. If …  […]

  3. […] How can we measure writing so students, parents, the community, and the teachers know that students are improving? If this is our definition of assessment, we have many options for measurement. If …  […]

  4. Hi, Fran! I want to connect with you and talk more about this if possible! I will be facilitating a “Balanced Literacy for the Secondary Classroom” session next week. It will be the third time this PD is offered for teachers of grades 6-12. It’s a great course, but I feel like something still is amiss and I cannot figure out what it is.

  5. […] How can we measure writing so students, parents, the community, and the teachers know that students are improving? If this is our definition of assessment, we have many options for measurement. If …  […]

  6. […] How can we measure writing so students, parents, the community, and the teachers know that students are improving? If this is our definition of assessment, we have many options for measurement. If …  […]

  7. […] writing assessment. If I am a student, I can use rubrics, checklists, my personal goals and feedback from peers, teachers, and those I communicate with through blogging, etc.  […]

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