Slice of Life 27: Summers

(During March, I am blogging daily as a part of the Slice of Life Story Challenge!)  Special thanks to the hosts of the Slice of Life Challenge:  StaceyTaraDanaBetsyAnna and Beth.   More Slice of Life posts can be found at  Two Writing Teachers .

 

I am building on Anna Gratz Cockerille’s post from yesterday, based on work by Ralph Fletcher at #tcrwp last summer.  (Don’t take my word for it!  Go read the post so you know exactly how to write this kind of poem!)

 

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SUMMERS

Sometimes I remember
the good old days

Walking the bean fields to remove
the cockleburs and corn

Playing baseball with the cousins
in front of the barn

Eating Muscatine melons
and celebrating the summer

Swimming lessons at the park
grocery shopping after

Bike rides around the block
some days, all the way to Riverside

I still can’t imagine
anything better than that.

What do you remember about your childhood summers?

(Check out Anna Gratz Cockerille’s post from yesterday for more information about creating this type of poem!)

 

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11 responses

  1. Ahhh how wonderful! I love sharing these “good old days” poems because you get such a glimpse into how people grew up. We wrote them in an after school session on mentor texts that I led with some teachers. We commented on how you can tell who grew up in the midwest (or other rural area) because our poems had such similar tones. It makes me wonder what kind of good old days poem my son will write if he grows up in the city. And it makes me want to get him some time in the country.

  2. Thanks for the idea! Let me know when or if your kids need some Iowa time. Last year my Florida nephews went to the Iowa State Fair. It is fun to explore those icons through children’s eyes!

  3. So many experiences that kids today can’t understand. So much freedom allowed in our play. Sounds like you had some good old days. I’ve jotted this down and someday I may give it a try. Sounds like a lot of others have tried this with their students from the comments on Anna’s blog.

    1. I think I saw this on Twitter last summer from the 2nd Writing Institute. I think it’s a nice piece for students!

      Thanks for checking out Anna’s blog! I appreciate your daily comments! ❤

  4. I was at this Institute and remember this so well – we even used it as a writing exercise the first week of school. As Elsie said, our students don’t seem to have the same freedom to be bored, roam around, make up their own fun during summer. !00% of my students go to summer camp – 60% of them sleepaway. So much for lazy summers!

    1. I want to use this with teachers, too!

      I’ve always been pretty rural. . . I can’t remember the last time I lived on a paved street . . . . Wow! 100% to camp! I remember going to camp once. . . might yet be a slice!

      Thanks, Tara!

  5. I loved the “good old days” poem! It was fun to write, and I had even more fun reading everyone else’s!

    1. Thanks, Jennifer. It was fun. (But I have struggled more with “formats” on my blog! – I want it to look the way I WANT!)

  6. Ralph came to a conference I went to last summer in Los Angeles and I did this too. Totally forgot about it. Thanks so much for reminding me of summer. We have so much in our brains but only have room for so much!

    1. I am ready for the weather to change – at least in my mind. This was fun to do and I am looking forward to the variety I believe I will see when I do it with teachers!

      Thanks, Julieanne!

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