Generative Writing as a Formative Assessment

Last week I was working with a group of pre-service teachers like I do every semester.  I lingered on the writing examples, techniques and goals in the genres, mentor texts, and specifically generative writing.  As I presented to this group, I literally wondered “aloud” why I had never written about generative writing.  I believe that the power of generative writing lies in its ability to replace tired, ineffective DOL practice with meaningful, relevant writing that can also be used as formative assessment tasks.

So what did the pre-service teachers do?

They wrote a sentence where “writing” was the first word in a sentence with at least 10 words.  And then they wrote a sentence where “writing” was the last word in a sentence with at least 10 words.  Finally they wrote a sentence with “writing” as the fourth word in a sentence where they could choose the length (but it had to have a minimum of five words so “writing” was not the last word).

And then we had a conversation/discussion with a few focused questions:

  • Which sentence was the hardest to write?
  • What made it hard?
  • What strategies did you use to help complete the task?

The majority said that the sentence with “writing at the end” posed the most challenge because it was the complete opposite of the first sentence.  Some said that the first two were basically easy because it was about “flipping” the words in the sentences and that the third use of “writing” as the fourth word was harder because “you had to think about what could go before it”.

Strategies that they used were counting words on their fingers, oral rehearsal, drafting and scratching out, drafting and then counting, and checking with a partner. This was meant to be an introduction, that in a classroom would include oral practice, study of mentor texts, and examples of vocabulary words used in various positions in real published work.

What is Generative Writing?

Generative Writing is a term used to describe instructional strategies that provide students with parameters for their writing. These factors define boundaries for writing at the sentence level.

  • Providing a word to be used

  • Defining the word’s position in the sentence

  • Specifying the number of words in a sentence

  • Limiting the number of words in a sentence

The model described above comes from Doug Fisher and Nancy Frey’s Scaffolded Writing Instruction: Teaching with a Gradual-Release Framework.

scaffolded writing

What are the effects of  generative writing?

  • Build sentence fluency
  • Build word choice
  • Deepen understanding of content
  • Deepen understanding of vocabulary
  • Use writing as a tool for learning
  • Write in a variety of genres

I think that sentence fluency, word choice and writing in a variety of genres are already covered in many writing workshops at a variety of grades.  However, I believe that using generative writing in content areas to deepen understanding of content, vocabulary and even as a tool for learning and assessment are previously untapped areas of formative assessment that could be guiding higher-quality targeted core instruction for ALL students.

So how would I use generative writing as a Formative Assessment?

I would use this with departmentalized content-area teachers who have all of their own content standards as well as a responsibility for reading and writing ELA standards.  Asking a science class to use “photosynthesis” as the first word in a sentence will probably result in a definition.  Here is an example of how the work may be sorted as well as the plan for using a second generative writing after some re-teaching.

science

 

How did I plan for the generative writing at the top of the page?

I am a firm believer that I must “practice what I preach” and complete writing tasks in order to increase my own understanding of writing.  So of course I actually wrote some sentences.  Here are some examples of sentences that I generated during the planning phase for my work.

Writing is one of my favorite ways to express ideas because my artistic and musical talents are limited. There are some days that I feel like the most important part of the day is when I have time for writing. Some may argue writing is just one of many skills that students need to develop, but I would suggest that totally divorcing reading and writing is an exercise in futility.  “Show don’t tell” and “Teach the writer not the writing” are my two most favorite Lucy Calkins’s quotes about writing.  What are your favorite quotes that you use to encourage writing?

The tasks I assigned myself:

  1. Use “writing” as first word in a sentence with at least 10 words.
  2. Use writing as the last word in a sentence with at least 10 words.
  3. Use writing as the fourth word in a sentence as well as somewhere else in a compound/complex sentence.
  4. Use writing as the last word in a sentence using quoted text.
  5. Use writing as the last word in a question.
  6. Develop a cohesive paragraph during this generative writing exercise.

I believe I met all 6 of my tasks; what do you think?

How might you use generative writing?

Advertisements

7 responses

  1. Fran- I have not tried generative writing in this way before. I can’t wait to try it! Thanks, as always, for stretching my thinking!

    1. Susan,
      Let me know how it works for you! There was a version for younger students. Naming the sounds and the position in a word to see what the kiddos came up with!

      You are welcome! There is always MORE learning! That’s a good thing! ❤

  2. […] Last week I was working with a group of pre-service teachers like I do every semester. I lingered on the writing examples, techniques and goals in the genres, mentor texts, and specifically genera…  […]

  3. I LOVE this idea Fran! I see its value in content areas, and will find ways to include it into our mission unit these next few weeks. It reminds me of the work Jeff Anderson does around imitating sentences that use a particular mechanical or sentence structure. While it is not exactly the same, it is getting students to write over and over, and in a way that is not asking them to come up with all the ideas on their own, so as to focus on a few, and practice, practice, practice. This is what they need! Thanks for the very cool lesson.

    1. Cathy,
      You are so welcome! I need to look some more at Jeff Anderson’s work. I like the idea of “focused writing” with more practice and NO GRADING! Using writing for a bit of formative assessment is a win/win for students and teachers! 🙂

  4. […] When you hit the “Publish” button instead of the “Preview” button . . . (as I did on Sunday) […]

  5. […] and I was continuing to think about generative writing, in particular with younger students.  See this earlier post for the nuts and bolts about generative writing.  I continue to believe that it’s a powerful […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Doing The Work That Matters

a journey of growing readers & writers

Present Perfect

adventures in multiple tenses

Leadership Connection

from Great Prairie AEA

The Blue Heron (Then Sings My Soul)

The oft bemused (or quite simply amused) musings of Krista Marx -- a self-professed HOPE pursuing Pollyanna

Middle English

Life as an English teacher leader

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas and Resources

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.

I Haven't Learned That Yet

This blog serves to document my path of learning and teaching.

Simply Inspired Teaching

A blog by Kari Yates

Reflections on Leadership and Learning

Sharing my learning experiences

AnnaGCockerille Literacy

The Generative Power of Language: Building Literacy Skills One Word at a Time

Reading to the Core

Just another WordPress.com site

Karen Gluskin

My Teaching Experiences and Qualifications

%d bloggers like this: