#TCRWP Reading: Takeaways Day 4

Writing about Day 4,

Anticipating how Day 5 will go,

Downloaded Nine, Ten.

Opened Nine, Ten.

Everyone will mention the same thing, and if they don’t, when you ask them, they will remember. It was a perfect day.”

Rush, Rush, Rush.

Pack, Toss, Go.

Downloaded Raymie Nightingale.

Opened Raymie Nightingale.

“There were three of them, three girls.”

Revise, Plan, Revise – Finish that homework.

Worry just a bit about the weight of the carry on suitcase.

Tweet about need for book 3 for flight.

Boarding pass screenshot saved in gallery.

Repack day/work bag.

What do I REALLY need for today?

Checking to see if there’s a long-lost “un-read” book on my kindle.

Procrastinating

Something about writing Day 4 post that seems too rushed . . .

Not ready for Day 5

It’s too soon . . .

The beginning of the end!

Enough!  What about Day 4?

Amanda Hartman

Rev Up Your Teaching Muscles to Make Your Whole Group Instruction as Potent as Possible (Mini-lessons, Shared Reading, Read Aloud) (K-2)

We brainstormed a list of all the things that could go wrong in shared reading and then came up with some solutions.  What fabulous work for a grade level PLC or vertical PLC?  How many different ways can we solve those recurring issues?   If we don’t have the solution, we can reach out and pose the question on Twitter or check into the topics of the weekly #TCRWP Twitter Chats!

Pace . . . speeding up our instruction, and adding a bit more enthusiasm and excitement did help meet the “Engaging and Engaged” criteria.  It’s not about being a “mini-Amanda”(which would be amazing!),  but it is about considering exactly which behaviors contribute to the success of a lesson.  So many ways to check in on students – thumbs up, turn and talk, act out, share outs – without slowing down to wait for 100% of the students!

Takeaways:

  1. Teaching students how to self-evaluate  is so important ~ Even on Day One in kindergarten!
  2. Lean teaching – less teacher talk and more student talk and work is critical – I already know it!
  3. Shared Reading – Use a story telling voice; not a point to every word boring voice!
  4. Not every Read Aloud book has a book introduction.  Don’t kill your Read Alouds. Know your purpose!
  5. Do you know Houndsley and Catina?  Such great characters with so many problems!

 

Kathleen Tolan

Beyond Guided Reading: Expanding Your Repertoire of Small Group Work in Nonfiction (3-8)

Today we saw some different options for note taking for small groups.  The key is to record the information that is vital for continuing on.  Did you check in on Joey? Ok? Not?  Quick notes – no complete sentences needed – that will keep the groups and you moving forward.

We also presented our series of three lessons and had some superb coaching that led to our revision assignment for tomorrow!  YAY, Revision!  Fixing and making stronger YET leaner! What a challenge. Not more words  . . . but more precise words! Clarity in the Teaching Point and Link!

But the amazing part was watching Kathleen, quite masterfully, run three different groups in the room at the same time in 12 minutes.  Simply amazing.  All three groups were working on different goals.  All three groups had some group and individual time with the teacher.  It did NOT seem rushed.  But yet there was a sense of urgency and a need to get busy and accomplish the work!

Takeaways:

  1. Written Teaching Points keep you focused!
  2. Try 2 simultaneous groups.  Assign locations and then get all students working on reading first!
  3. Know what your end goal is!
  4. Have your tools and texts organized with extras handy!
  5. Give it a go!  Nothing ventured; nothing gained!

Choice Session

Katie Clements

The Intersection of Guided Reading, Strategy Lessons and Book Clubs

Key Principles of Small Group Work:

  1. Kids do the heavy lifting.
  2. Small group work is flexible.
  3. Small group work is assessment – based. 
  4. Small group work is for EVERYONE. (so is independent work)
  5. Small group work empowers kids.  (set goals, work with partners, or lead own group)
  6. Small group work builds skills over time. (cannot master in 10 min.  – or expect transfer)

I loved creating this chart  (putting Katie’s info into the boxes) to compare the three types of small group instruction that we typically see in classrooms.  How are they alike?  How are they different?

Guided Reading Strategy Lessons Book Clubs
Who? Kids reading at or close to same reading level Kids who need help with the same skill, goal, or reading habit

Not level dependent

Kids who read at or near the same reading level
What? Teacher – selected texts

Slightly above independent reading level

Usually kids’ independent reading books Kids have limited choice over the books

Multiple copies of the same title

Why? Move kids up levels Help kids strengthen reading skills, goals, habits

Support transference

Deepen engagement

Deepen reading, writing, talk about books

Provide authentic reading experiences

How it goes? Book introduction

Kids read/teacher coaches responsively

Ends with conversation and a teaching point

Begins with a teaching point and brief teach

Kids try to do the work with teacher coaching

Ends with a link

Kids develop agendas for reading, thinking, jotting

Teachers coach in to support skill work and talk

Takeaways:

  1. Book clubs provide so much student choice and need to be used more frequently.
  2. Book introductions can definitely go more than one way – so helpful to SEE two different ones for the same book.
  3. Scaffold student work – figurative language can be found on this page that I have pre-posted for you. (Student finds word -Teacher has narrowed down to this page, and this one, and this one! – So smart!)
  4. All students reading before teacher starts coaching tends to lead to lean coaching. (Not answering task questions)
  5.  Think as you read.  When do you wish for a tool? Something to help you through a tricky part?  That’s what students need!

How important is community to adult readers?  To our novice readers?  

How do teachers practice enough to be “skilled” at their teaching/coaching craft?

 

 

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8 responses

  1. […] Writing about Day 4, Anticipating how Day 5 will go, Downloaded Nine, Ten. Opened Nine, Ten. "Everyone will mention the same thing, and if they don't, when you ask them, they will remember. It was a perfect day." Rush, Rush, Rush. Pack, Toss, Go. Downloaded Raymie Nightingale. Opened Raymie Nightingale. "There were three of them, three…  […]

  2. Hmm- I like the idea of having more than one small group going at the same time, but know that would be challenging for me. Would have loved to see that in action. I wonder if there are videos of this on the TC Vimeo. I hope your last day is as great as the previous 9. Breathe- you can spend the rest of the summer absorbing it all- I know I will.

    1. Erika,
      I know in an earlier year that Kathleen talked about two groups at the same time so it was awesome to actually SEE it!

      I know – the mental let down after these two weeks – still have some topics tucked away to write about – but also excited about some reading time toooooo! ❤

  3. I recently read Raymie Nightingale – enjoy the sweet story! As always, thanks for sharing your learning for us to learn from you.

    1. You are welcome, Amy!

      I don’t know YET which book I will begin with. Just thankful to have three to choose from!

      1. Amy, I had Nine, Ten and Eleven read before my plane was delayed. Both are fabulous!

  4. I can see doing two groups (in certain areas) but three….yikes! There is something about Kathleen that just pushes (in a good way) the urgency factor. I can see her doing three small groups simultaneously. Shoot, she could probably do four. Complete mastery!

    1. Yes, it was so good to see. And I agree, Kathleen could do four!!! So powerful to see.

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