#DigiLitSunday: Motivation

digilit

What truly causes one to learn?

Is it the search to answer a question?

The insatiable curiosity of one who just wants to know more?

As I have been traveling in Rome, I have been wondering about this issue. Where does motivation really live?

So I thought about comparing  two of my tours while here.

Tour 1: Catacombs

The local guide, name unknown, used storyboards to illustrate the main points. Her voice was soft for our group of 52 pilgrims. But her voice rose and sped up with her excitement and passion. Some of her questions were rhetorical. But we sat in a group hearing the background information about what we would see in our tour.

I took notes . . . 10 pages of S notes on my phone. I talked to other tour group members, took pictures and even tweeted out pictures and comments. (I have no clue how to copy anything on this new device. . . Mini-iPad 4 so you will have to find the tweets yourself!)

Was I told to take notes? Was I told to pay attention? Was I told “this would be on the test”?

The answer to all those questions is NO!

Tour 2: The Sistine Chapel

The tour guide was a recording. I moved at my own pace. I listened to the first section to learn about the frescoes on the ceiling, a separate recording for The Redemption, more about the Cardinals and the current use of The Sistine Chapel, and then another recording about the care and maintenance of the chapel.

I can speak oF generalities. The voice did not exude passion. I chose to be there. I chose the order of my learning.

And yet, the tour did not inspire me to take ANY notes.   Maybe I was influenced by the constant, “Silencio” and interrupted by, “No video” and “No phone camera”.

But what if the difference was in the lack of personal inspiration or challenge from a real live person whose dedication to the topic encouraged me to learn more? What if the passion and excitement of a teacher FOR their subject matter  is absorbed AND reflected by the students?

What if your students need  a personal connection?

What if the “motivation to learn” is fueled by choice, time and commitment to learning AFTER it is IGNITED by a teacher . . .Or another learner?

How do YOU plan accordingly for students who don’t learn the same every day?

 

please head to Magaret’s DigiLitSunday for more posts.

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10 responses

  1. You bring up a great point about the passion of a teacher for a subject, Fran. I can think of a number of times in my own life when I’ve been inspired to learn more after hearing someone talk about a topic they’re passionate about. I’ve also seen this in my own students. Enthusiasm is contagious! Looking forward to hearing more about your trip!

    1. So true, Catherine! And I’ve seen the drudgery tha learning becomes when it’s all the same cookie-cutter approach!! Always more to learn!

  2. I love this question, “What if the motivation to learn is fueled by choice, time, and commitment to learning after it is ignited by a teacher?” Let’s all carry that torch and spread a fire for learning!

    1. Thanks, Margaet. I think motivation for our current students is different than the past.

  3. I love how you reflect on your process. Clearly the human to human expression of passion ignited your learning!

  4. Passionate teachers are the spark that ignites students’ curiosity in the early stages. Then, the day comes when the learner knows just what to do (as you so evidenced during your trip to Rome).

    1. Carol,
      That is so true that passionate teachers really are the spark! ❤

  5. […] My idea was to tell how a post originated from one idea/ one tour during my recent trip to Rome. It was a topic that I briefly addressed two weeks ago (while in Rome) under the topic of Motivation here. […]

  6. […] posts about Rome are here, here, here, here, and here with this one quick photo from O’Hare before our international […]

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