#SOL17: Words

Recognize this?

letter

I saw a three letter word.

Then a five letter word.

I shuffled the letters around.

I could use six letters.

Whoa!

Check out the point total.

A silent, mental, fist bump.

“Oh, YEAH!”

“48 points!”

Then I tried just again to add in that final seventh letter.

Greedy. . .

I wanted the bonus from playing all the letters in one word.

It did not work.

Once more. . .

No Go.

I quickly pulled out my six letters.

Arranged them

Pressed the send.

Pushed the button to say, “YES, I want to play this word.”

And then a scream of anguish.

“NOOOOOOOO!”

I had played “enslave”

On the wrong “e”.

Not 48 points

A mere 18.

Attention to detail.

Real life importance of “word placement”.

A game I lost by 5.

And should have, could have, won by at least 30 points.

“Can I have a redo?  Video instant replay?  Do over?”

word

The difference between absolutely no “extra point tiles”  or two “DW” tiles . . .

The difference between enslave for 18 points or 48 points.

One of my favorite pastimes – “Words with Friends”.

One of my most frustrating pastimes – “Words with Friends”.

Where do you learn your “Life Lessons”?

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

Advertisements

16 responses

  1. Love how your game taught you so many life lessons! Great use of metaphor.

    1. Sally,
      I was going to write about last night’s chat but this timely mistake was just perfect. Taking a risk on being real. We need to share a wider range of our own stories with our students!

  2. Fran, I feel your pain – I have done the same thing! Yes – We can find life lessons everywhere!

    1. Thanks, Christine. This goes to relevance. A deeper understanding of the WHY? We can find these every day!

  3. Let’s play, Fran! And make sure you make those sorts of mistakes when you’re going against me! Your slice is a great mentor for building tension and then using unexpected twists to create a meaningful lesson. May I use it with fifth graders?

    1. Please use it, Melanie. That would truly be my honor. Small moments truly can be one little event!

      I was going to work on something with “audience” after last night’s chat but that is still percolating in my brain! ❤

  4. Oh the should have, could have, would haves! Great slice. You had us hanging, expecting the win and then…Bummer. Play on.

    1. Julieanne,
      I have stolen the “should have, could have, would have” mantra from you. It explains so many things.

      Forge on!

      NO come back in the second half like the Patriots. No Overtime!

      Yes, play on! ❤

  5. Sometimes our fingers are just too quick. I know I am often guilty of hitting “send” without going back to reading what I am sending. I then get angry at myself for not checking things first…kind of like think before you speak. Once it is out there there’s no taking it back.

    1. I know . . . “Haste makes waste!” was one of my first thoughts after “!@#$%” and then “It’s only a game!”

      Good reminder that, “Once it is out there, there’s not taking it back.”

  6. Great slice, Fran! The story is really good and I love the way your presentation creates the mood. Play on… you won’t make that mistake again too soon.

    1. Alice,
      You are correct! Double checking the numbers before I click . . .”Take my finger OFF the button.Take a deep breath.” Double check. Triple check.

      Not for a bit anyway . . . .<3

  7. Oh, yes I too have had those hurried mis-steps. I think that is one of my life lessons – slow down! But I get so excited and competitive playing a game!

    1. Terie,
      I know . . . “Win, Win, Win” and that adrenaline just buzzes! LOL

  8. Ahhh! Attention to detail, slowing down a little to check and the power of words are all important lessons I learn over and over again. Loved this slice!

    1. Lisa,
      Simple things . . . YET so powerful when they are all combined together. Haste makes waste!

      Thanks! It was FUN!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Doing The Work That Matters

a journey of growing readers & writers

Present Perfect

adventures in multiple tenses

Leadership Connection

from Great Prairie AEA

The Blue Heron (Then Sings My Soul)

The oft bemused (or quite simply amused) musings of Krista Marx -- a self-professed HOPE pursuing Pollyanna

Middle English

Life as an English teacher leader

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas, Strategies and Tools

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.

I Haven't Learned That Yet

This blog serves to document my path of learning and teaching.

Simply Inspired Teaching

A blog by Kari Yates

Reflections on Leadership and Learning

Sharing my learning experiences

AnnaGCockerille Literacy

The Generative Power of Language: Building Literacy Skills One Word at a Time

Reading to the Core

Just another WordPress.com site

Karen Gluskin

My Teaching Experiences and Qualifications

To Read To Write To Be

Thoughts on learning and teaching

Books and Bytes

Exploring the best of literature and edtech for the middle grades.

To Make a Prairie

A blog about reading, writing, teaching and the joys of a literate life

Raising Voices

Thoughts on Teaching, Learning, and Leading

chartchums

Smarter Charts from Marjorie Martinelli & Kristine Mraz

%d bloggers like this: