#SOLSC17: Storm Saga

The storm damage reports continue.

The story began yesterday here.

One local school here and here.

Relocating for the remainder of the year

F2 Category

Winds at approximately 120 miles per hour . . .

“Update: We will be using the Seymour Care Center and the Methodist Church to finish out the school year.

Care Center: 3yr old preschool -12th classes

Methodist Church: Vocal, Band, and Family Consumer Science classes (students will be bused to these classes)

There will be no school through Friday, March 10th. We will keep you posted if we have to add more days.

We would like to thank the our community, all emergency personnel, and surrounding communities and schools for all of your support and prayers. We will need volunteers when we are able to start moving classrooms to the Care Center.

Again we will keep you updated as we know more.” Source

hope

How do you measure hope?  

How do you measure pride in your community?

How do you show your strength?

How do you measure resiliency?

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

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22 responses

  1. Yikes! Must be scary times! I am glad you are safe.

    1. Thanks, Erika. So many uncertainties. And such is life!

  2. Events like this often bring a community together, but that doesn’t make decisions any easier. I, too, am glad you are safe. We had a tornado hit the ground a few towns over two weeks ago and no one was hurt, but the devastation of some buildings was stunning. I hope your town rebuilds …
    Kevin

    1. So true, Kevin.
      Just a few short moments can cause a lifetime of change. This particular district had passed a bond issue recently so it will be interesting to see if the “rebuild” actually ends up to be even better than anticipated . . . still painful!

  3. Wow – so scary. Hoping everyone was safe. I had to keep rereading to piece all the information together – it raised my anxiety as I read which went well with the piece. I liked how it felt like a puzzle to solve and then I was left with pondering about hope. It must be a tough time.

    1. Clare,
      I hadn’t meant for it to seem quite so disconnected . . . but I do wonder if we often tell/show too much and don’t leave enough work for a reader.

      More to think about!
      Thanks!

  4. One way of measuring strength is one’s ability to reach out and share your struggles. I’m glad you’re in my community, Fran, as I don’t think I would have paid enough attention to the Iowan storms. I’m paying attention now!

    1. Melanie,
      I appreciate #TCRWP for making me more aware of east and west coast issues since I have friends in both places. This community both broadens the world as well as shrinks it down to “I know that place . . . or those folks . . .”

      Thanks for reading and commenting!

  5. How very frightening, Fran! I usually only have to worry about severe thunder storms or occasionally an ice storm here in the Philadelphia area. Your wild weather is scary, but it seems the community is so strong – pulling together to solve problems and help each other. Your final questions are so powerful!

    1. Lynne,
      Thanks so much . . . Now I have to look at a map to see where “latitude -wise” Philadelphia falls. I don’t hear too much about extreme weather there. Lucky for you!

      I really love ending with questions! It’s definitely ME! 🙂

  6. I’ll be thinking of you and your community all day. We are in severe wind gusts. That crazy Iowa weather breeds some strong and amazing people.

    1. Thanks, Sarah!
      The strength of the people is amazing!

  7. Phyllis Sutton | Reply

    Wow! The weather has really hit your area hard. I am so sorry to hear that. Strength, I think, is often the ability to go on regardless to what life throws in your way.

  8. Hope, community, resiliency – they are all connected and necessary in our otherwise uncertain lives. Thinking of you, my friend.

    1. So connected and intertwined . Thank you, Tara!

  9. Oh my gosh, Fran! I, too, will be thinking of you and your community today. What an experience… I am confident you will play a integral role in supporting everyone through this! Thinking good thoughts for you… – Lanny

    1. Thankful for so many caring and thoughtful friends, Lanny!

  10. I’m sorry to hear about your community, Fran. What a terrible thing to lose one’s home and school and other important buildings. My junior high was destroyed when I was in 8th grade, but it was in mid-May, so school simply ended early. It was a devastating tornado. (I grew up in Missouri.) The community did rally and helped everyone who lost personal belongings, but it was a blow as I’m sure you know. I’m glad you are safe.

  11. So many lives disrupted, yet so many people pulling together. Inner strength is what gets people through times like this. Let me add to the list by saying I am glad you are safe.

    1. So many reasons to be thankful!

  12. I’ve heard and read good things about all the helpers coming. What can my kids and I do to help our neighbors in Seymour? Please let me know if you think of a unique way we can support those kiddos!

    1. Kathy,
      Classes start again on Monday. Let me check. Sharing books and/or school supplies. Notes to new friends. Let’s think some more together!

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