#SOL17: Just Wait . . .

What sentences or words caused

Anxiety,

Fear, or

Trepidation

in your Impressionable Growing Years?

Was it the dreaded . . .

Dum, ta Dum . . .

giphy

Just wait til your dad gets home?

It was a dark and stormy night

(Sorry, Snoopy, I had to borrow that, but it’s so untrue

so that’s why the strike through was used!)

Rules

Expectations

Permissions

One memory

That persists

Decades and decades later . . .

Waiting . . .

Waiting . . .

Waiting . . .

Waiting . . .

for Dad to get home.

What had I done?

Nervous,

Anxious,

Apprehensive . . .

Running to the door.

Announcing to all,

“HE’S HOME!”

Then running to get the tools.  It was time.

The house was brand new!

It took an

“Act of Dad”

For measuring, drilling holes and pounding mollies into the wall.

Unthinkable?

It wasn’t drywall.  A nail couldn’t just be pounded in.  A different form of gypsum board.

Not really a control issue.

A forward-thinking Dad who did’t want to spend future days patching holes and matching paint.

“Just wait ’til Dad gets home to hang items on the wall!”




Where do your ideas come from?

What techniques do you use to build anticipation in your stories?  

Could this structure work for you?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

Idea Source:  A one line memory (often-used phrase)

Technique:  Like a riddle, give clues, without revealing until the end.

Graphic:   Giphy search for “waiting for dad”

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6 responses

  1. This is a great structure. For me it was definitely, I’m telling Mom.

    1. Aileen,
      YES! The goal isn’t a 32 page storybook. But how can one phrase spark a mini-story? Playing with structure reveals that I love riddles and puzzles!!!

  2. I love this. A phrase that captures a big emotion. And I laughed at the mollies in the wall. What is the purpose of those things?

    1. Provide more surface area for the fastener to actually attach to within that plastic part. Today’s lesson – How to write from basically one sentence. Could I add more detail? Sure? Do I need to? My goal was to get you to laugh . . . and you did! Whether it was over the picture you conjured up or the picture that it was NOT! ❤

  3. Not the reason I expected for “Wait til your dad gets home”. Growing up in a small patch, not even a town, where everyone knew everyone it was always would my neighbors see be doing something they did not approve of and report me to my parents. It is hard to be on your best behavior at all times.

    1. As a farmer’s daughter, cocooned in a series of friends/families, I so understand that it is impossible to be on perfect “best behavior” all the time. And of course some folks “big problems” were totally different priorities! Thanks for commenting!

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