#SOL17: Stories

Where do ideas for stories come from?

Some stories come from a picture that captures an idea.

Some stories come from an observation.

Some stories come from a conversation.

Some stories come from a thought or idea inside the brain.

Some stories come from a question.

I had the pleasure of hearing Kate Messner share with a panel on Friday where the idea for Over and Under the Snow came from . . .

tracks and then a hole in the snow

over and under

And then this book became a mentor text for additional texts.

About Over and Under link

Advice for writers from  Kate Messner here

Where are your ideas coming from? 

What are you paying attention to? 

What are you wondering about?




slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 




Additional information:

Neil Gaiman on ideas here

Story Nuggets here

Wiki how here

Heart Maps by Georgia Heard here

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6 responses

  1. I just wrote my blog post on a single phrase my daughter stated to me yesterday. Her words set off a flood of thoughts and memories and I just had to capture the ideas in a SOL.
    I do find it fun to think about where my ideas come from – you just never know!
    From following #ncte2017 on Twitter, looks like there will be MANY SOL posts generated for you and all the attendees!
    #jealous

    1. Christine,
      I’m still working on understanding my own processes. I have a heart map, but nothing from it seemed to work this morning so I went back to thinking about what I had heard over the weekend. Ironic that Kate’s presentation was on “structure” but one of the ideas that stuck in my brain was WHERE the idea came from.

      And yes, my fourth year at #NCTE – it’s like Survivor for the Teacher. I have to pay all expenses to go but the fuel for my heart, mind and soul absolutely demands it! ❤

  2. We never know where that spark of an idea will come from. I have always tried to instill in my students to be observant and keep an open mond. Their next great writing idea might be waiting for them just around the corner. Have been away from NCTE too long and need to get back. Happy Thanksgiving, Fran.

    1. NCTE was amazing and what a great mental start for Thanksgiving!

      I’m finding that too many “topics” are making it hard for students to write. Getting ready to write needs to be smaller than the big, big, big topics found in many classrooms!

  3. I’m saving this post for Thanksgiving break, Fran (my brain is stuffed with turkey related things right now!) – such amazing resources! Thank you!

    1. You are welcome, Tara. Missed you but also know that you are busy and just finished traveling as well!

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