#SOL18: March 21

 

Hit

To strike

To smack into

Perhaps on purpose

Perhaps by chance

In baseball, a way to advance around the bases .  .  .  perhaps to score.

Run

To move quickly

To race

To chase the wind

Perhaps its luck

Perhaps its skill

In baseball, a way to score a point.

A Call

“M’am, are you still parked in the visitor’s lot?  I need you to come and check your car.  It’s been involved in a hit and run.”

I almost didn’t answer the phone.

It was an unknown number.

Our visitors were saying goodbye.

I finally accepted the call.

Screenshot 2018-03-20 at 9.55.27 PM

White on black.

Damages –

Cost undetermined.

Hit and run . . .

Video camera recorded the story.

How do you deal with frustrations caused by others?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this daily forum each March. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      slice of life 2016

The BIG question . . .

@here do I park tomorrow? 

Same spot? 

Different corner?

Advertisements

20 responses

  1. That’s awful! I hate having to deal with stuff like that! I grump the whole time! May you have a gentler spirit than I and handle the inconveniences of this with grace.

    1. Erin,
      I still can hardly believe it! Crazy, crazy, crazy!

  2. I love the way you led us into the story of your poem. Defining the word hit and then run. I assumed it was baseball season until the moment you took the call. What a bummer!

    1. Thanks, Cathy.
      I’ve spent time this month with trying out more interesting, and less explicit, openings! 🙂

  3. I wondered where you were going with the poems (by definition). Sorry you had this experience. So disappointing when people don’t do the right thing. I’d park in the same spot probably.

    1. Diane,
      So interesting when folks just ignore basics. I’m stuck on the “does lightning strike twice in the same spot?” Wouldn’t that now be the safest spot?

      1. Yes, yes. Hope the culprit has a pang of conscience.

      2. Commercial vehicle so it will have consequences far beyond me. . .

  4. UGH! Life is filled with so many of these ‘minor’ frustrations that cause us to scratch our heads and wonder about the actions of others. Sorry this happened. Love that slicing is a way to process it with others-we feel your pain!

    1. Thanks, Paula! There’s almost a physical relief by the time the slice is written! So HELPFUL!

  5. LOVE the structure. LOVE the multiple meaning of words. LOVE the meaning when both words are placed together. Such a clever structure to write about a not so clever – in fact annoying moment. Thanks also for sharing your % writing. I used it with as I tutored this week and used it today as I reflected on my writing!

    1. Thanks, Sally. I actually saw deer last night and was going to tie it into my usual “brush” with deer and some form of dear, deer . . . but that didn’t work out! So much fun to try to bring a bit of humor to a basic GRRR! I saw your %! Yay, you! Enjoy your precious time and travel! ❤

  6. How awful! And you are left with dealing with insurance (and police?). I, too, like your opening with definitions.

    1. Thanks, Adrienne. Yes, the dealing with . . . I just can’t imagine doing this myself, so I’m still suspended in the “disbelief” range, as well as thankful no one was hurt and it wasn’t a deer which could have been worse. . . and . . . 🙂

  7. How awful. To hit and run is a sign of cowardice. So many people refuse to own up to things they did and leave others to clean up after them. Sorry this happened.

  8. A creative way to slice an unfortunate small moment. So sorry to hear this happened, Fran! What a drag 😦

  9. So good to hear that other’s were watching for you and caring. 🙂

  10. I say you’ve had the accident. Park anywhere tomorrow. The odds are in your favor.

  11. Hit. Run. Call. Had me thinking we were going to read what the umpire declared; safe or out. Glad no one was hurt. How frustrating to have to deal with someone else’s careless mistake.

    1. Kristi,
      I never thought of including the umpire . . . maybe on another baseball story! It’s the “Pain” of the time spent dealing that is annoying!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Mrs. Palmer Ponders

Noticing and celebrating life's moments of any size.

doctorsam7

Seeking Ways to Grow Proficient, Motivated, Lifelong Readers & Writers

Doing The Work That Matters

a journey of growing readers & writers

Present Perfect

adventures in multiple tenses

Leadership Connection

from Great Prairie AEA

The Blue Heron (Then Sings My Soul)

The oft bemused (or quite simply amused) musings of Krista Marx -- a self-professed HOPE pursuing Pollyanna

Middle English

Life as an English teacher leader

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas, Strategies and Tools

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.

I Haven't Learned That Yet

This blog serves to document my path of learning and teaching.

Simply Inspired Teaching

A blog by Kari Yates

Reflections on Leadership and Learning

Sharing my learning experiences

AnnaGCockerille Literacy

The Generative Power of Language: Building Literacy Skills One Word at a Time

Reading to the Core

Just another WordPress.com site

Karen Gluskin

My Teaching Experiences and Qualifications

To Read To Write To Be

Thoughts on learning and teaching

%d bloggers like this: