#SOL18: Why Practice?

It was a simple comment.

It brought me to a complete stop.

“We practice to build proficiency.”

Is that the goal?

Proficiency?

If we build or meet proficiency, what does that mean?

Screenshot 2018-06-12 at 5.27.30 AM

Retrieved from dictionary.com

In education, there seem to be points in time when proficiency has become a form of a new longer, four-letter word.  It causes a pain in my stomach.  It brings up visions of charts where students are color coded green, yellow or red that result in assignments to specific interventions.

Proficiency, in education,  now often implies an ability to meet an arbitrary cut point.

A “Yes”,  I made it or a “No”, not yet?

Once?

Twice?

Three times and that’s good?

What does proficiency look like in football?

One example

These descriptors come to mind:

Self- assessment

Goal-setting

Beginning with the end in mind

Time

Repetition

 EVERY. SINGLE. DAY.

Why do readers need to read (practice) every day?

Why do writers need to write (practice) every day?

To meet external goals?

To meet personal goals?

Is there a sense of urgency?

Is there a sense of joy?

A feeling of accomplishment?

Has it become drudgery?

What is the real goal?

Do readers and writers EVER stop practicing?  Should they?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      slice of life 2016

 

 

 

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5 responses

  1. Although I don’t think of it as practicing, I guess every time we write something, even if it is just a grocery list, we are practicing our writing. I tend to write my list according to the aisle set of in the store. Would this count as organization? Likewise, every time we pick up something to read we are practicing our skills. We use context clues to help figure out the meaning of unfamiliar words. So, I would say yes, we are constantly practicing and becoming better because of it.

    1. And we extend ourselves EVERY time we read something outside of our “comfort zone” so we just need to think about all the possibilities!

      And yes to organization and writing grocery lists by the aisles. (Why did I think I was the only one?)

  2. Clare Landrigan | Reply

    Love that video clip – we use it all the time with kids and teachers — it is Tom after all and we are in Boston. I reflected today on my first slice of life — it too was about sports and practicing for the love of the game!

  3. YES, YES, YES! We practice to build our skills towards proficiency but knowing that we are constantly learning new ways to reach beyond.

  4. Practice on my friend. Not for proficiency, for accomplishment.

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