#SOL19: Day 11 SOLSC

I’m pretty sure that the steam rising from my poor computer is clearly visible on all coasts. It’s been rising for awhile but I was determined to really focus more on narratives as I sliced this month.

But life interfered.

I applauded this tweet a week ago.

Finally.

A reputable reading researcher.

I’ve talked about Dr. Nell Duke and research before.

Here, here, and here.

She’s my “go to” when I need the details on research.

 

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But then all this other gobbledy gook stuff comes up. Pseudo – journalists who, after 2.5 years of studying “the science of reading” bless it as the ONLY way to teach reading and now are having webinars on Edweek, radio shows, and articles purporting to tell teachers how to teach reading.

How to debunk the malarkey?

Start with P. L. Thomas’s “The Big Lie about the ‘Science of Reading'” here.

It’s an amazing article that debunks the whole issue.

And if you need additional reading material, here’s a direct plea for media also by Thomas.

Here is where the journalist said she did not have to report both sides – link

Why?

Because these are the journalist’s sources:

https://mrgmpls.wordpress.com/…/where-i-learned-how-to…/https://jasmineteaches.wordpress.com/…/why-our-kids…/ 
http://pamelasnow.blogspot.com/…/an-open-letter-to… “These “authorities” on teaching reading 1) pre-service teacher 2) teacher in his 4th year of teaching. The other link is a  professor’s blog in Australia about their pre-service program.”

Sources for the condition of reading in the U.S.

Consider the source.

Is the person even in the field of education?  What are their credentials?  What is the source of their data? 

Read critically!

The future of our children literally depends on all teachers.




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this daily March forum from Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.

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Administrator Webinar:  How to communicate the need for evidence-based practices from the What Works Clearinghouse Link

17 responses

  1. Of course there is no ONE way to teach all children to read! That’s a given. There is no one way to do anything in life

    1. Anita,
      So true. Your observation of “There is no one way to do anything in life” is so spot on! 🙂 It is so frustrating to hear the opposite view everywhere from such a newcomer!

  2. How to debunk the malarkey…it’s good advice for anything we read, especially on social media. The thing that troubles me the most is how many people jump on a bandwagon because the theory is new and related in an authoritative way. Think people!

    1. Diane,
      I agree that the most disheartening is how “many people jump on a bandwagon”. Thinking is definitely required!

  3. This really shows the importance of researching the researcher before accepting what they say as face and a viable solution. So many of our students assume that just because the see it on line, or in a newspaper, or on TV that it is a face. This is why it is so important to teach students how to evaluate their source material.

    1. And
      Having a major platform, Forbes, NYT, Ed Week, NPR, Kappan does not guarantee reliability either. Now looking into ownership/sponsorship of those organizations. Used to think “fair” coverage. Now I worry that they don’t do their own “Due Diligence”. 😦

  4. THANK YOU! Thank you, thank you , thank you! Finally–common sense.

    1. The ONLY thing that works for ALL students is a knowledgeable teacher with a repertoire of skills and strategies who uses responsive instruction (including sensible assessments & progress monitoring) to meet the literacy needs of students.

    2. You are welcome. Keeping it simple and comprehensive made for some difficult choices!

  5. This has always been important, but in this day and (technology) age, it is more important than ever. Thank you for the post!!!!!

    1. You are welcome! Something to think about!

  6. thank you for these links, @franmcveigh!

    1. Christy,
      Information is critical! You are welcome!

  7. I’m glad you sliced about this. This ‘debate’ has become a part of so many of our lives lately. Your advice to read critically is so important. Thank you for sharing the links so that we can read for ourselves—critically. I love reading your slices every day and I am so grateful for your ideas, your advocacy, and your wisdom!!

    1. You are welcome, Paula. Of course, there is bias in the links I presented ( all connect to others) and the ones I left out. I fear it is all about the notereity and has nothing to do with “credibility” and that is a huge loss. Whole states are making major educational shifts based on yet another version of “science”.

  8. Wise words to consider. We live in a world where we all must debunk malarkey everywhere! Thank you, Fran!

    1. You are welcome, Tracy. It seems to be piled pretty high right now! 🙂

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