#SOLSC20: Day 20

Screenshot 2020-03-19 at 10.01.43 PM

I pulled my chrome book out of its case and plugged it in.

Power?  Good.

Connection?  Good.

The scroll across the bottom of the TV caught my eye as a rumble filled the air.

Oh, yeah, severe storm alert today.

WRONG!

Tornado alert.

And my county.

Crap!

I don’t have time for the internet to be interrupted.

I have a Twitter chat tonight and I need to change out two slides.

Pre-tweet moved.

Original tweet deleted.

Message to the team; “Not available for any task tonight.”

Thunder continued to rumble.

And then pound, pound, pound.

Down came the hail.

Bouncing up to a foot off the ground.

Solid balls of ice.

Chipped balls of ice.

Cold.

Dreary.

Dark.

Now, hailing!

Yukko!

Good thing I needed to be inside tonight.

Too bad I didn’t get out in the 63 degree weather earlier this afternoon.

It was a long night.

I put my chrome book back in the case.

It was a dark and stormy night.

When does the beginning of your story match the ending?

How does that make you (the reader) feel? 

Where might you try this craft move?




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this daily forum in March. Check out the writers and readers here.

Screenshot 2019-01-29 at 3.12.16 AM.png

9 responses

  1. I love when stories come full circle and end as they began. Sorry about the storm, but at least that will pass quickly!
    Yukko! perfect!

    1. Diane,
      In this case it is not necessarily safety or security when the story went full circle, but it was a sense of “completeness” for me. A satisfying ending! Thanks!

  2. Tornado warnings put an abrupt stop to many things. I like how full circle brings closure to a piece. The sound of hail pelting the ground is unnerving.

    1. Some places in Iowa reported two inch hail. That’s huge and so damaging. Thank goodness crops aren’t in the ground as that is hard to recover from!

      Thanks, closure was one of my goals!

  3. Love bookends for a poem or story! I love the way you placed the words on the page – the length of lines. I felt and heard this storm. Scary! Glad you were not out driving somewhere! Two-inch hail – yikes!

    1. Yikes, exactly, Lynne!
      Sometimes I think we overlook the visual presentation of our work BUT it does matter. Playing with bookends is so much fun!!!

  4. Great poem and great reminder of a powerful craft move.

  5. Love Snoopy. and love the simplicity yet depth of the poem.
    🙂 Are you ok? It sounded intense.

  6. Very much enjoyed your slice and the completeness of it, together with the rounded off beginning and end. Tornadoes sound so frightening, but I’ve often experienced the hail and other storm ingredients you described…at least you were safely inside!

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