#SOL20: What If?

What If?

What does it look like if/when students resume classes in school buildings?

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Maybe this?

Screenshot 2020-05-25 at 9.15.19 PM

Or this?

Screenshot 2020-05-26 at 11.18.46 AM

Or this?

What will school look like?

What will students look like?

How will everyone be safe? secure? and ready to learn?

Who makes those determinations?

From Sarah Gross and a superintendent in New Jersey: Link 91 questions.

What If?

It’s hard to plan for the future

So many uncertainties

So many possibilities

So many paths

Too early to choose

So many uncertainties.

Rest.

Rejuvenate.

Dream of “best case” solutions.

What is your plan?

What will you do in the interim while waiting for decisions?

What questions are swirling in your brain?

What if students, communities, and school staff planned collaboratively?

What do you envision?




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this weekly forum. Check out the writers and readers here.

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13 responses

  1. The stress of envisioning has me Not going there right now. We’ve finished out this year. Our district is working on getting 1:1 Chromebooks. Is that a solution? Nope, but it’s certainly a forward movement. In our area, only 10-30% of people are even bothering with wearing masks. I can’t see how we can make kids do it, or teach with one on for that matter. It’s too overwhelming to consider.

    1. Absolutely overwhelming. And no single solution will work for all children. Or alk achiols.

  2. Sooooo hard, right? I am hoping at my school they ask for teacher input. I am a planner and the unknown is a challenge for sure.

  3. I go back and forth between trying to plan and waiting for guidance. It is hard to envision what school will look like, or even how many parents will send their kids. My hope is that information will be passed along soon so that we can begin to plan and determine the right measures to take for our kids.

    1. Timing is everything. However, this one feels like it is going to be tough.

  4. That photo feels like the undoing of all of the rich collaborative work kids do in workshop classrooms. That said, I understand that these times are going to mean letting go of some of our best practices. One day, when there’s a vaccine, we will get back to the rich instruction we know kids need. But right now, we have to keep everyone alive.

    1. I can’t see the pictured system working for K and 1st for so many reasons related to 5 and 6 year olds. Otherwise … ???

  5. Fran, thanks for bravely posing the questions. I will admit, I’m not ready to form an answer. I’m keeping my head down to teach from a distance for 3 more weeks and then have a list of things I want to do for my summer – read Laurie Halse Answerson books (somehow I haven’t yet); learn about: Seesaw, kahoot, Genilally, and LearningApps; Listen to more podcasts; read Read the World; and work on making a guide for facilitating Teacher Research Cohorts in my district. It feels good to make this list. Maybe come August, I’ll be ready to form an answer. For now, 3 weeks and my summer of learning plan will keep me going. Thanks for asking!

    1. Ah. But you have a plan to plan. Perfect.

  6. So many good questions and so few answers. How do you combine collaborative learning with social distancing? What will cafeterias look like it will students take lunches back to their class? Will self contained replace departmental classrooms? It will be interesting to see how different districts react.

    1. So much to think about! ❤

  7. I have faith that teachers will make it work as they always do. While this has been difficult, I have loved the learning, collaboration, creativity, and new relationships. I do believe some things will change for the better and some we will strive to never lose. For me, my essentials have carried me and continue to guide me- purposeful use of time, agency, and interaction.

    1. Clare…. our values shine ever so brightly. Difficult decisions but as long as the students are the focus, we will survive!

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