Category Archives: #NCTE18

#SOL18: Which View?


Fluffy

Pellety

Pristine

Early

Pretty

Accumulating

Blanketing

Warning

Caution Urged

“Tow Ban”

Travel Not Advised

White Out

Weather Channel personnel on site

Millions under “Blizzard Warning”

3″ in Pella

15 miles away – 12″

Busy Travel Day

Flights Cancelled

Cautious Early Travelers Rewarded

Overturned bus stranded passengers at casino

Early snowstorm

Snowmaggedon

Blizzard of the Century

Depending upon your snowfall

Pretty – Hazardous

Snowball packing snow

0 Visibility

Better inside

Off the roads

YAY! Snow Day!

Rats! Off to work . . . Slowly . . . Cautiously!

“Bruce” according to the Weather Channel

Travel conditions deteriorate

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Maybe as bad as the “Blizzard of 73” . . . Maybe . . .

I’m in the gold; fortunately not in the orange!

Which view of the winter activity matched your area?

Why does perspective or point of view matter?

Can it change over time?  Can you “choose” your response?

What’s your prediction for the winter?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum from Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.

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#NCTE18: Decisions


Research-Based Decisions

I wrote about Reading Research here and Dr. Mary Howard capped our #G2Great chat with this post on 11.03.18.  As I reviewed the #NCTE18 program in the weeks before the conference, I thought about my “research filter” and the sessions available.  I also thought about previous conferences and this post. What factors would drive my decisions about sessions to attend?

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Before I even arrived in Houston, I had perused the app and added many of my favorites to my list. At first glance about half of our crowd-sourced experts would be present.

“Richard Allington; Donald Graves; Don Murray; Peter Johnston; Marie Clay; John Hattie; P David Pearson; Lucy Calkins; Tom Newkirk; Taffy Rafael; Nell Duke; Ken and Yetta Goodman; Louise Rosenblatt; Kylene Beers; Bob Probst; Carol Lyons; Ellin Keene; Donalyn Miller; Kathy Collins; Fountas and Pinnell; Stephen Krashen; Stephanie Harvey; Regie Routman; Debbie Miller; Jennifer Serravallo; Gravity Goldberg; Kate Roberts; Maggie Roberts; Ralph Fletcher; Nancie Atwell; Penny Kittle; Kelly Gallagher; Kara Pranikoff; Dave Stuart Jr.; Cornelius Minor; Katie Wood Ray; Anne Goudvis; Georgia Heard; Jan Burkins; Kim Yaris; Susan Zimmerman “ (Literacy Lenses 11.03.18)

And I added others:

Tom Marshall, Kari Yates, Christina Nosek, Clare Landrigan, Tammy Mulligan, Lester Laminack, Colleen Cruz, Justin Dolcimascolo, Jess Lifshitz, Jeff Anderson, Smokey Daniels, Sara Ahmed, Carl Anderson, Ruth Ayres, Stacey Shubitz, Katherine Bomer, Donna Santaman, Dorothy Barnhouse #BowTieBoys, #TeachWrite, Lynne Dorfman and Rose Capelli. (Representational list and not meant to exclude anyone.)  And then there were teachers, authors, poets, “Slicers” and friends as presenters.

What was the reality?

With luck, I would be able to choose about 15 sessions.

15

The names above represented about 65 sessions.

I had four time slots with five possible sessions to attend.  Without Hermione Granger’s “time-turner” that was not going to happen.  So how was I going to make decisions? What would I use as my filters?

Research-Based Decision-Making Filter

Why was I interested in research?  I wanted the best quality experience that #NCTE18 had! Research, classroom-based and empirical has always fascinated me. I’m pretty picky about my educational research. I believe in being an “informed educator” as espoused by Nell Duke and Nicole Martin’s 10 Things Every Literacy Educator Should Know about Research.  The work presented at #NCTE18 would be research-based.  Much would not be research-tested. It is easy to get lost in the misrepresentation and misuse of research. Of course, there are limitations.  But one only has to read this gorgeous new text by Donalyn Miller and Colby Sharp to connect with the research about the need for book access for all! And just like a book and movie pairing – I want to read the book before hearing Colby and Donalyn talk any more about it – so one decision made!

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I was pretty sure that sessions at #NCTE18 would not be guilty of these misleading uses of research that Mary Howard listed in her blog post.

“Citing research to sell products

Citing research to justify practices

Citing questionable research to support an agenda

Citing flawed and outdated research”

But I do want to remind you that some national conferences have sessions that seem to be at cross-purposes with the beliefs and values listed for the conference! Careful reading of program descriptors and sponsors is always a good idea.

How would I use research as a filter?

One of my criteria for session selection was NEW and recent work, perhaps something that has become an addendum or just a continuing evolution since the last book was published or their July #ILA18 presentation. That was the purpose behind my attendance at both Responsive Teaching:  The Courage to Follow the Lead of the Reader and Capacity – Based Writing: Instruction Empowers Students –  Deconstructing the Struggling Writer Label while Championing Inclusive Practices.  I knew some individual pieces of their work and wanted to see how the “presentation package” brought in the research, the work with students, and increased my knowledge.

What other criteria did I use?

Who have I not seen lately? So after spending an entire day with Penny Kittle and Kelly Gallagher and 350+ best friends in Iowa in October,  300 minutes . . . Was I going to try to catch them as a part of a 75 minute panel? . . .

Ellin Keene was with Debbie Miller in July at #ILA18, so I heard about her new book there after reading it.

Have I already registered to see them at CCIRA in Denver in February? There are another 10 slots or so where I will see presenters alone . . . no panels, no roundtables, just the speaker and a room full of learners. And with preregistration everyone should have a seat.

Where are there gaps in my knowledge base? This question led me to sessions about equity, mentor texts, and literacy mentors on Friday. And then there was the second session about the 4th edition of the Handbook of Research on Teaching of the English Language Arts.

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Am I under-utilizing available resources? Of course that led to the featured student panel, the ubiquitous #BowTieBoys that I heard three times at #NCTE17, and #TeachWrite friends.

Will I be able to make it to the room in time to actually be in the room for the program? We tried five different sessions on Thursday and ALL were overcrowded and packed with “bouncers” on the door to keep additional attendees out. Many times the lack of seating in the room was a decision point as well.  Sometimes I deliberately chose a session that I believed would have fewer attendees.

#NCTE18 often had over 60 sessions per time slot.  That means there were many choices.  Some might even argue that there were too many choices.  However, 7,000 + attendees had to be somewhere so “choice” of sessions is crucial.  I believe that filters to sort out expertise and research wer helpful for me when I had to make final decisions about the sessions where I would learn the most. And the sessions that I was curious about. And the sessions that challenge me to stretch and grow!

 How do you make decisions about competing sessions?   

What criteria do you use? 

What criteria will you consider at your next conference?

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#NCTE18 Posts

#SOL18: Literacy Superbowl

#NCTE18 Bound: #G2Great

#NCTE18 Thursday

#NCTE18: Friday

#NCTE18: Saturday

#NCTE18: Sunday

#SOL18: #NCTE18 Family

#NCTE18: Digging Deeper #1

#NCTE18: Digging Deeper #2

#NCTE18: Digging Deeper #3

#NCTE18: Digging Deeper #3


Professional Learning:  My Right and My Responsibility

#NCTE has fueled my learning for the last five years.  I found folks that stirred my learning heart and soul.  Hearing those words straight from the authors who wrote them was transformational. Their passion and excitement extends long past a panel, a roundtable, or a presentation.

And yes, it comes with a cost.  The cost of attending a national conference. #NCTE asks attendees about the source of the expenses in their conference surveys.  The likelihood of a school paying for every expense incurred may make the cost prohibitive but there are many of us who attend on a regular basis (five consecutive years) who are quite “picky” about our sessions because we are there for the learning and attend on our own dime..

After hearing Tom Newkirk at my first #NCTE conference loudly proclaim that a hamburger graphic organizer was an insult not only to a paragraph but a bigger insult to a hamburger, I have read his books, been in a twitter chat with him, and watched for authors that mention his name.  He is Ellin Keene’s editor and Ellin has so many words of praise for him. This year at #NCTE it was truly a pleasure to listen to:  4 Battles Literacy Educators have to Fight

  1. Economy – Curriculum as Hoarding (add, add , add & nothing is deleted)
  2. Louise Rosenblatt – Model of Reading – Literacy as Transaction
  3. The battle for writing. Writing should not be colonized by reading. 795,000 fanfiction pieces about Harry Potter
  4. Battle for choice- Carnegie – “public library”  Teachers will need to make it free!

Since returning home, I have reread his essay in this collection.

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I have also read these two books since #NCTE18.

And I am returning to some sections of these two books for more work with Responsive Teaching because I know that teachers have to “say less so readers can do more”!

I now have some reading and writing plans to consider that involve my own thinking and application. Some will appear in my own professional development, some may show up in this blog, and much will continue in future conversations with friends as well as Twitter thinking.

For those who did attend #NCTE18, how will you extend your learning?

Here are some possibilities:

  1. Read a book by an author you heard.
  2. Listen to a podcast by an author you heard.
  3. Participate in a Twitter chat by an author you heard.
  4. Write a blog post or two about your learning.

An investment of time is required for any of the four items listed. You can borrow the book on interlibrary loan at no cost or check and see if a friend has it in their professional library.  Check online. A free chapter may be available on the publisher’s website. Additional follow up ideas may come from the publisher’s website or a facebook page for the “group”.

So if attending a national conference is “on your list”, start planning now.  How can you begin “saving” for that dream?

  1. Read the twitter stream from #NCTE18.
  2. Read some blogs from #NCTE18.
  3. Plan for a roommate NOW.
  4. Make a plan to re-allocate some personal discretionary funds so you can attend.

Where will you begin? 

What is your plan?  

 

#NCTE18: Digging Deeper #2


A second look at a Saturday session because I’m still trying to define “Responsive Teaching” and I saw it masterfully executed in this session. And I am still in awe. And so thankful that these readers, writers, and educators are in my life.

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Responsive Teaching:  The Courage to Follow the Children

Presenters:  Kim Yaris, Jan Miller Burkins, Dani Burtsfield,  Christina Nosek, and Kari Yates

Jan began with having us close our eyes to “Think about a teacher who loved you into being” and then having us share that story with a partner.  It’s often easy to remember those who did NOT love you into being but responsiveness begins with the heart . . .  Don’t rush to “check it off.” Skill and expertise has to come behind.

 

What’s the focus if you view student work through the lens of “Love”? 

What’s the focus if you view student work through the lens of “Expertise”? 

This was the student work we viewed.

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Not just judging and reacting, but thinking in terms of what the student “can do”! 

  • Phonological awareness
  • Most of the alphabet and how to write it
  • Knows how words work
  • Knows onset
  • Knows rime
  • Knows rhyme 
  • Understands what is socially appropriate communication!

Kim also read “Daisy” from Who’s Doing the Work and we considered what we knew about Daisy as a person and as a reader. It was extremely helpful to have a partner to add more ideas. (My immediate thought that went into my notes:  And what if PLCs operated more with this type of data?)

Being responsive is about seeing students, understanding and responding based on the love and expertise of the teacher.

Students doing the work.  Teachers stepping back and admiring student work first before responding.

To Know and Nurture a Reader

Conferring is a path to responsive teaching, raising and following the voice of one student at a time.

Using Four Quadrants – so visually appealing and helpful . . .

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There are many questions that fit into each of those boxes and those are available in Christina’s and Kari’s book.

If a conference begins with:

What’s going on?                           

What is my response?  It may vary . . . 

“I wonder, I jot a note or

I wonder, I affirm, I jot a note or

I wonder, I affirm, I remind, I jot a note or

I wonder, affirm, extend, remind, take note”

And then those basic responses in a visual format. . .

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What if they are coded by thought bubbles for “wonderings” or talk bubbles for “affirmations” and boxes for the notes/glueing reminders?

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This format could be my conferencing format.

I might have 4 of these boxes on a page.

Depending on our conference content, a box might hold different colored ink entrees or dates as I record the content from the conference in this format.

Thinking about the application of THIS work.  How does it make sense?

And what a treat. Dani had examples of work in all four quadrants for a kindergarten student.  Here’s an example of one kindergarten student’s “Healthy Habits” . . .

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As I listened to Dani’s examples from a kindergarten level, I thought of Christina’s fifth graders.  I wondered if they could complete a reflection about themselves as a reader.  Christina said, “Just wait” and then she shared a fifth grade student page from which I am only sharing the book choice portion.

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BUT

Have teachers done this work?

Where do teachers stand in these four quadrants? 

How aware are they? 

How would this move teacher confidence and competence in coaching readers forward?

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My Take Aways: 

  1. Responsive teaching  – you will know it when you see it.  It’s hard to describe but pure magic when you see it in action. Today:  Being responsive is about seeing students, understanding and responding based on the love and expertise of the teacher. Conferring is a path to responsive teaching, raising and following the voice of one student at a time.
  2. “Step back so your students can step forward.” Jan and Kim
  3. “Don’t wait for perfection. Start now.” Christina and Kari



Twitter:  @burkinsandyaris       Facebook     Site:  https://www.burkinsandyaris.com/

Jan Burkins: @janmillburk     Kim Yaris: @kimyaris

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Twitter  @ChristinaNosek  @kari_yates

Facebook group 

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#NCTE18: Digging Deeper #1


Two Saturday sessions have left me with a lot of thinking points. Thinking, processing, writing, and thinking some more. Here’s the first one!

Capacity – Based Writing: Instruction Empowers Students –  Deconstructing the Struggling Writer Label while Championing Inclusive Practices

Presenters:  Kass Minor, Colleen Cruz, and Cornelius Minor

Not one to leave seating to chance, I had a two-pronged plan. A)  I asked a friend to save seats and B) I mapped out the plan to access the room and literally ran to the session. So three of us had front row seats. It was packed. People on the aisles. People on the sides. People on the floor. Everywhere.

And then the audience. Carl Anderson in row two. Kelly Gallagher in row two. Dorothy Barnhouse on the floor.  Katie Wood Ray in the back. And a whole room full of people I didn’t even see!

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Writing:  It’s complicated!

What’s in a label?

Kass had us thinking about language right off the bat. If we begin with describing our own behaviors, needs and characteristics, what’s the range of descriptors that we use?  She modelled some and then put us to work with a partner doing the same work. Pay attention to the language you use.  Too often schools (and the people inside the school) see what the person cannot do.  This pushes a student to one extreme or the other.  Then we have to spend time repairing those ideas.  If we are aware of our language, we can be less dehumanizing.

Positive Descriptor Behaviors, Needs and Characteristics Negative Descriptors
Can tap out multiple recognizable cadences – beyond beginning drummer! Fidgets – finger tapping ADHD – Disturbs others, Noisy

How do we make sure that students can and are accessing the core curriculum?

Colleen batted this section literally out of the ball park.  Her knowledge of kids, instruction, and the law make her a powerful connection for helping students who are experiencing difficulty in writing.

Disabled?  People still don’t talk about it. Both of her last books have some sections on access:  The Unstoppable Writing Teacher and Writers Read Better. Colleen began by reminding us that, Where you are positioned is affected by your ability.  It changes from place to place. Kids are only special education students at school. We are the power brokers for our kids. Not coming up with nicer synonyms for a label.  Being authentic. Removing instructional obstacles.  

“Do students need to sit still for writing?

Do students have to use a pencil?

Do students have to write quietly?”

These were just a few of the questions that Colleen posed.  And quickly answered with my favorite, “Burn the pencils for students who are struggling with them!”

And what about the student who is using a wobble chair with a chromebook that has Dragon that does not understand his/her speech?

Better questions:

“Where did you do the most work? 

What part do you like?

What are you working on in your writing?

Who is your audience?

What kind of writer are you?” ( with a response in a letter format)

Amplifying students’ strengths and approximations – and complying with ESSA – help students be more successful. They sit a bit taller when we call them “authors” and “writers”. What language and actions set students up for success?  What language and actions set students up to advocate for themselves?

Supporting claims with well-reasoned writing

Cornelius put us to work instantly with a 30 second search on our phones for a photo to talk about. We had an oral rehearsal with our partners to tell the story of a picture. And then we practiced messing around with claims, first to support a claim of his:  A – protagonist is super resilient or B – protagonist is super clumsy and silly.  We examined a video text for evidence, watched the video clip twice and then stated our claim and evidence to our partner.  

What did this feel like/ look like?

Quite comfortable.  Skill isolation.  Just like in sports.  Beginning with the skill in isolation before chaining any other actions.  Building the context.

Beginning with popular media, a video clip and then talking with friends.  Then moving to a different text.  Could be a poem.  Could be a short story.

Cornelius labelled this: Standards Bearing Writing – meeting you where you are.

No annotation. Beginning with viewing and talking.  Beginning where all students can experience success.

Then planning instruction based on students readiness for the next step and then the next.  This does not have to consume tons of time.  We practiced two different arguments in less than 10 minutes.

Talk. A plan. Setting the stage. Building context. Legitimatizing “effort” with many possible answers.

BECAUSE

I teach people – not a curriculum.

Love in a classroom is attention to people.

The first attempt is messy. Handwriting is not a concern.

Spelling is not a concern. Writing is a process.” Cornelius Minor, NCTE18, 11/18/18.

Improvement begins with US!

How are you improving your language?

How are you providing real choices so students will be successful? 

How are you beginning your instruction so that kids are first successful, with a lot of talk, on the initial isolated skills? 

How are you building your own capacity?




Colleen:  @colleen_cruz and colleencruz.com  

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Kassandra Minor @MsMinor1  kassandcorn.com

Cornelius Minor @MisterMinor

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#SOL18: #NCTE18 Family


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‘Tis the season to be Thankful.  ‘Tis the season to count my blessings. #NCTE is the perfect kick-off for family events.  #NCTE brings my work family together!

This year’s theme was:

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But, for me, it has also ALWAYS been about finding my own voice. My own family of voices.  A family that allows me to have a voice.

#G2Great

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Slicers

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Teach Write

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Presenters and Authors

 

 

 

Students

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so many facets to MY FAMILY!

How do you nourish your “work family”? 

How do you continue to grow and learn?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum from Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.

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Additional Links to #NCTE18

Conference of Revolution

Kelly Gallagher’s Top 15

NCTE Sunday

Miss Magee’s Letter to Students

Proud, Fierce Papa Bear

Statement Against Oppression

#NCTE18: Sunday


Sad Sunday Smashing Slashing Schemes

Sad, it’s the last day of #NCTE18

Sunday, wow, really?  It’s easy to lose track of the days!

Smashing! Great line up of sessions. Still difficult to choose!

Slashing!  That was the session back in the dungeon, in the back, back, back, under the auditorium.

Schemes!  Already plotting for #NCTE19

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The final general session with twins, Peter and Paul Reynolds.  Gifted artists. Gifted story tellers.  Gifted.  And what a gift to us!  Peter read two books to us.  The Word Collector and Say Something. Treasured moments!  So much to learn from all of those around us and we do need to share our voices.

What’s New in the 4th Edition of the Handbook of Research on Teaching the English Language Arts

This was my second session (ILA the first) about this book.  Critical ideas that teachers and administrators need to be aware of and discussing.

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And on assessment: YOWZA!

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I’m researching more information about #affectiveassessmentsmatter and Comprehensive Reader Portraits through Career Dream Drawing Assessment.  Talk about relevance for students!  (UK parallel research link)

And a quick vocab note:  Bill Nagy, quoted by Susan Watts-Taffe University of Cincinnati, “There is no magic list of vocabulary words.  Cohesion around kinds of cohesion is helpful. Thematic work with vocab offers significant practice.  It’s about what you do with the list.”

Breathe New Life into your Writing Instruction:  Practical Roundtables that Will Push Your Writing Further

Kidblogging – Joy Writing Through Student Blogging with Margaret Simon and 

connecting with Teach Write friends.  First F2F meeting with Leigh Ann.  YAY!

And as the conference wound down, one last social event Sunday evening with some #G2Great friends!

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What’s next on your creating list? 

Where will you go? 

What will you learn? 

And with whom?

Thank you, NCTE!

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In case you have not been following along, here are the links to #NCTE18 . . .

#NCTE18 Bound #G2Great

#NCTE18: Thursday

#NCTE18: Friday

#NCTE18: Saturday

#NCTE18: Saturday


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The  magical learning continues at  #NCTE18 and a theme that emerged on Saturday:

Slow down . . .

Yes, there is a sense of urgency. 

Make every minute count.

BUT stop counting every minute. 

Stop.

Slow Down.

Look into the eyes, heart and soul of every student. 

The day flew by and again there were folks that I never saw. Decisions about sessions were incredibly hard to make.

The #BowTieBoys, Jason Augustowski and Dr. Mary Howard 

It is all about the heart. And paying attention to the students. Listening. And learning WITH them. This quote from Jason is a great snippet for teachers to consider.

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Roundtable sessions planned and executed by the students. Simply amazing.

Articulate

Poised

Powerful

Interactive

Showing not just telling

Students from middle school through high school.

Not to be missed!

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Responsive Teaching:  The Courage to Follow the Lead of the Reader

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The respect, love and joy of this panel made my day!  Students at the heart of our work.

 

A perfect merger.  And such important work!

Think about a teacher who loved you into being.  Responsiveness begins with heart . . .”
Don’t rush to “check it off”.  Skill and expertise has to come behind. Don’t land on the side of “judgment”.  “What’s going on?” “Wonder.” And then the learning that comes from the four quadrants.  

“Step back so your students can step forward.” Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris


Tom Newkirk has been a favorite of mine from my first #NCTE conference when he bemoaned that “the hamburger graphic organizer is not only an insult to a paragraph, but is also such an insult to a hamburger”.

4 Battles Literacy Educators have to Fight

  1. Economy – Curriculum as Hoarding (add, add , add & nothing is deleted)
  2. Louise Rosenblatt – Model of Reading – Literacy as Transaction
  3. The battle for writing. Writing should not be colonized by reading.Literary analysis 795,000 fanfiction pieces about Harry Potter
  4. Battle for choice- Carnegie – “public library”  Teachers will need to make it free!

    Questions to Ask when you Write

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When Phonics is the Foundation – in a Curriculum of Authentic, Deep Literacy

Lucy Calkins,  Rachel Rothman-Perkins and Rebecca Cronin

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Rebecca, Rachel, Lucy and Mabel

“To teach well is to rally your people with heart and soul to learn with courage and enthusiasm. Fear:  Is this curriculum going to cover everything?  Mastery? Proven? Everything? Fear-driven anxious place is far too common with NO place in child’s emergent literacy. Voice is the single quality that matters most. Voice matters for teaching, and learning (as well as writing). To teach phonics well, imagine yourself at kitchen table talking to someone right there with you. Teaching phonics is leading and teaching. “

“That sense of connectedness matters tremendously.  Connecting matters. Connecting to reading and writing. TRANSFER – only reason to teach phonics for reading and writing. TEACHING kids identity. Language is a joyful world!”


And because this is not an “All About” post since I promised “snippets” I will write later about the fabulous session from Colleen Cruz, Kassandra Minor, and Cornelius Minor.


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#NCTE18: Friday


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Moments in time

Moments suspended

Moments desired

Moments expected

Moments shared

Magical because of the connections

Across time

Across states

Across texts

Across interests . . .

Magical Mentor Moments

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“We come from:  Oklahoma, Iowa, California, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Canada.  Mentors All.” (10 points to you if you know the context of this quote.) TY: #G2Great for so many magical moments at #NCTE18.

Writing in the Wild = Margaret Simon

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“Slicer” Dinner = Mentor Writers

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An annual tradition from #TWTBlog. Three of the authors from #TWT and some of the bloggers at dinner and sharing literary gifts!

And then the sessions:

Choices

Difficult choices.

So many great ones.

So little time.

What fuels the choices?

Friday, November 16, 2018

Passion and Power

Be you.

Be real.

Activism means thinking, talking, reading, writing, and growing your passions.

I love this 5th grader’s quote shared by Justin Dolci.

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And the people . . .

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Mentors

Readers

Writers

Thinkers

Storytellers

Magical #NCTE18 Moments

Where have you found your magic? 

And your mentors?




NCTE Highlights

#NCTE18 Thursday


Opening Day of #NCTE18

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Registered?

Program Dog Eared?

Social?

Here’s a collection of the #G2Great folks.

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Afternoon sessions:

If you went early, you might have been found sitting on the floor.

If you went on time, you may have not gotten into the session.

If you went late, you were SO out of luck.

There were “bouncers” at the door

Their job

To turn back the crowds

To placate the fire marshal.

Fifth year

Fifth year of underestimating the crowds.

Each room

Packed to the gills.

For many, a chance to review the program,

Greet friends in real life,

Continue conversations.

Thursday General Session  – Chimanda Ngozi Adichie

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If you are not on Twitter, you need to go there.  You need to search the #NCTE18 tweets for those from her talk.  For more about Chimanda see her site here.

Think about this next statement for a minute. Read. Pause. Reread. Take a breath.

“We live in a world where a person can be murdered because of what he wrote.”

It’s 2018.

And this is our truth.

Not politics.

Our reality.

Literacy, more than ever, is critical

FOR LIFE!

Other quotes:

“When we value a student, we teach them to value themselves.”

 

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Chimanda spoke of being curious.  And that #OLW (One Little Word) of mine came to the forefront.  In fact, my “curious” is with me.

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As #NCTE18 continues, you will see where my curiosity leads me!

What are you curious about?

Mrs. Palmer Ponders

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