Category Archives: Reading

BRAVE Reflection


I’m a literacy consultant who works with seven districts.

How do I know if I’m being effective?  

Doing a good job?  

Doing what really works?

I have to start with the original . . . Clint Eastwood . . . same birth year as my dad who always kept me grounded!

good bad ugly

A Short Story

I’ve been traveling a lot over the last two weeks.  Over three thousand miles in a trip to Kentucky for an adorable grandson’s second birthday, then on to Florida with Mom and an aunt and uncle who is one of my mom’s younger brothers for a nephew’s high school graduation, and then back to Kentucky for some more time with the kids.

Was the trip successful?

Four possible data points might be these:

  • The number of miles driven successfully.  That is important because it was my first out of state road trip with my new car and then many miles driving a Ford 150 which is about three times the size of my car.  

What might constitute a success?  No flashing red or blue lights and no major problems.  The number of palindromes I noticed on my odometer and particularly the one as I traversed the Missouri River bridge in St. Louis.

What data would not point to a success?  Uncle Leo might say it was the number of times I drove over a curb.

  • The number of times my GPS and Aunt Shirley’s google maps agreed.  Less successful might be our decisions about which to follow when there was a disagreement.  

Success? Google maps was definitely more up to date than GPS.

Not a Success? The “shortest” trip was NOT always the ideal route to take.

  • The number of card games played.

Success?  The variety from hand and foot to pepper.

Not a Success? The number of 9’s and 10’s I had in EVERY pepper hand!

  • The variety of experiences and places we went.

Success?  Wading in the Atlantic, time with so many precious relatives, driving to the top of Lookout Mountain in Georgia, the flea market, a little homemade wine, the food, the movies, and stories after stories.  

Not a Success? Not driving back down Lookout Mountain (remember, not my vehicle!).

Do you notice a possible pattern?  

Each data point seems to have more than one side! 

If you had to sort these data points, could you find some summative as well as formative measures?

brave-word-art

So back to the beginning . . .

I’m a literacy consultant who works with seven districts.  How do I know if I’m being effective?   Doing a good job?   Doing what really works?

We collect a lot of data.  We spend a lot of time with data.  We spend a lot of time talking about data.  But do we EVER really address these questions?  Or does each question have multiple data points similar to those listed above.  This post is the result of many miles of driving and a push from Elizabeth Moore at Two Writing Teachers when she wrote this post last week, “Literacy Coaches:  How do you assess your impact?”  Beth talks about using goals, student-centered data, survey data and quantitative data in her post.

good bad ugly two

I have a ton of quantitative data to share.  At our agency we have had team Wildly Important Goals (WIGS) for two years focusing on our K-3 readers and using screener data to determine the effectiveness of our goals. I like to use them also as a beginning point when I reflect on my own effectiveness although they are only a small portion of my K-12 job.

WIG.jpg

PART ONE:

Here’s my data for four different types of my work in buildings by each month.

  • PDC = Professional Development in Core Literacy Instruction K-3
  • OCC = Observation/Coaching in Core Literacy Instruction Implementation K-3
  • PDI = Professional Development in Research-Based Interventions K-3
  • OCI = Observation/Coaching in Research-Based Intervention Implementation K-3

one data

The green boxes show that I met my goals which are also outlined below:

goal two

Good:

  • I met all four of my goals in December and in February.
  • I met my monthly goals 21 times.
  • I met my Observation/Coaching Intervention goal in December (after 5 months).
  • I met my PD Core and Observation/Coaching goals in January (after 6 months).
  • I met my total goal in January (after 6 months).

And to make me feel better . . .

  • My annual total for PDI was 94% so it was close.
  • Average percentage of goals met is 96.8%.
  • Total number of interactions was well above the annual goal just in a different distribution.  (146% above the goal)

Bad:

I missed my monthly goal 19 times. (19/40)

I met either one or zero monthly goals in August, March, April, and May. (4 months/10)

There were zeros in four categories across the 10 months. (4/40)

i did not meet my PDI annual goal.  (141/150)

Ugly: The hard reality of the data

August was not required for data collection but because it was almost a full month of work I decided to include the data.

I can offer excuses for the spring – horrific sudden death of my nephew and his wife in March and then my brother at the end of April, but the fact is that I only missed one PD session during either of those times – so excuses don’t change the data.

And if you would like to see the data in a larger format  – Data Here

good bad ugly three

PART TWO – How did students do on the screener administered in the fall, winter, and spring?  

Data is reported in terms of green boxes for buildings by grade levels if 80% of the students or more met the benchmarks set by the state. (Red if below 60% or fewer of the students met the benchmark criteria.) Districts can choose from several approved screeners but the state of Iowa only pays for one.

new data threenew data four

Good:

  • The total number of grades meeting benchmark by 80% or more by building increased from 7 in fall to 8 in winter with changing criteria.
  • The number of grades meeting benchmark criteria by 80% or more (green) building increased for kindergarten from 2 in fall to 4 in winter.
  • The number of first and third grades remained the same from fall to winter (3- first, 1-third).
  • The number of grades below 60% benchmark criteria decreased from 8 in fall to 3 in winter.
  • The number of grades below 60% benchmark criteria decreased from 8 in fall to 4 in the spring.

Bad:

Grades 1 and 3 did not have any buildings meeting 80% benchmark criteria in the spring and kindergarten and second had 2 and 1 respectively.

The spring green (80% benchmark criteria) was the lowest of the three reporting periods.

Ugly:

The 8 grade levels by building meeting 80% benchmark criteria in the winter dropped to 3 for the spring.

The 3 grade levels by building below 60% benchmark criteria at winter increased to 4 in the spring.

What questions arise?

How does this data compare to state-wide Iowa totals?

Which specific buildings have multiple levels of green?  or red?

What is working?  What is not working?

Is more practice needed across the day (distributed practice)?

Are discrete skills transferring to reading passages?

What about fidelity of implementation?  What does that data reveal?

Did we over rely on our winter successes that did NOT appear to transfer to spring benchmarks?

Brave = sharing this data publicly.

 It’s not all roses and sunshine.  What works in one building doesn’t necessarily transfer to what works in another building.

But, stop! 

Is all data equal?

  • How many students made growth?
  • How many students made significant growth?
  • How many teachers changed instruction based on the data?
  • How many teachers changed interventions based on the data?
  • What if the summative data (Iowa Assessments) shows a different picture of these same students?
  • How many students have reading goals for the summer?
  • How many students love reading?
  • How many students read at school by choice?
  • How many students read at home by choice?
  • How many students can name their favorite books?
  • How many students can name their favorite authors?
  • How many students can name their favorite illustrators?
  • And how do the students REALLY feel about school?

What data is missing from this snapshot?

Another short story

I am in total grandmother heaven.  He meets me at the door, takes my hand, leads me into the living room, and tells me what to do/play/where to sit.  “Gramma play.”  “Gramma here.” “Gramma ice cream.”  Gramma choo choo.” “Gramma dinosaur train.” I can’t even begin to count the number of times that I heard, “Where Gramma go?” during the last two weeks.  I count that as a success.  To disappear into another room and to be missed makes my heart melt!

Those are all data points that convince me that I’m doing a GREAT job as a grandma.  Are they numbers?  Are there specific criteria or cut points?

What data points match your school values and core instructional principles?  When do you need to make sure that you are triangulating data and not over relying on any one source?


If I had only shown you fall and spring student screener data, you would not have seen the growth that doesn’t seem to have been sustained.  That’s why my #OLW “BRAVE” is a part of this post.  This is our third year with this process. Because the cut points for benchmarks change annually, we can’t compare each grade level year after year but we can look at trend data to see whether grade levels of students continue to grow as the move up through the grades.

How are you reflecting on successes?  The good?  The bad?  The ugly?  

AND who are you reflecting with?

challenge

#SOL17: Voracious Readers


“Don’t read in the dark!” (Just yesterday in a hotel room while traveling!)

It’s my Kindle on my iPad.  It’s lit.

“When did you start reading?”

Have I ever NOT been reading?

I remember reading BEFORE I went to school for kindergarten.

And according to a first grader, “Was that before Columbus discovered America?”

I remember lying in front of a south window trying to sneak in a few more minutes of twilight reading hours.  In later years I remember having a flashlight and a book under my pillow in the camper so I could read if I wasn’t sleeping.  And now, now I read from my iPad.  Sometimes I read just a page or two.  Sometimes I flip back to an old boring friend and read just a page or two. And sometimes I read until the book ends!

My mantra:

voracious reader two

I checked out and read all the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books available from our public library in the 1960s and I credit those series for making me a serial reader – every book published by the author. (Note:  I love the new versions now available!)

Kylene Beers and Donalyn Miller (#TCRWP Reading Institute) have told us that series readers will be life-long readers.  Encourage students to embark on the exploration of a series OR TWO during the summer and they will be on the way to slowing or even stopping the “summer slide”!

Which books?

I’m not in favor of “mandated lists” because I believe that student choice builds a love of reading.  Here’s some advice . . .

voracious reader one

These eight bullets can help you, the teacher, increase your own voraciousness as well as  that of your students!

voracious reader creating one

Of course, building in a bit of humor as in “How would I rewrite the titles to fit a different concept?” can produce a graphic like “Hungry for Books”!

voracious reader

My final words:

voracious reader four

What does your reading list look like?

 How many TBR stacks do you have?  

When will you start/continue?  

How did YOU become a voracious reader?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

And what does this look like in a high school reading workshop???? How would you know if you have voracious readers?  Fabulous ideas from students incorporated into this rubric.

#DigiLitSunday: Better


better

Today’s call for slices from Margaret Simon at Reflections on the Teche immediately makes me think of HOW one gets better.  Previous posts about professional development are here, here, and here. I love learning.  I love learning with friends.  Therefore, one of the best tools that I use for professional development is Twitter because it truly is exemplified by this graphic.

good better best

What?

Learning.  Identifying a topic. Identifying a need.  Finding experts. Reading. Writing. Talking. Learning Together.  There are many ways to “Better Oneself” and one of the fastest routes is through TWITTER!

Start the Challenge

If you’re on Facebook, go to this post of Mary C Howard’s (author of Good to Great) for her Twitter 5-3-1 Challenge.

“TWITTER 5-3-1 CHALLENGE:
So I’m posing a summer challenge that will take very little time.

5: FOLLOW
Follow five people you admire. Just find them on Twitter and click the follow button on the far top right of their page.

3: RETWEET/LIKE
Retweet or like three comments that inspired you. Just click on the comment and then the up/down arrows at the bottom middle and hit retweet (or like with the heart at the bottom).

1: Reply
Make one comment to a tweet every day (even “Thank you.”) Just click on the left arrow at the bottom right and type.

I promise you that my 5-3-1 challenge will enrich you beyond measure this summer. Twitter is a treasure chest of inspiration, ideas, articles, posts, and dedication. If you’re not using it even to a small degree, you’re cheating yourself. This summer is a great time to dip your toe in the Twitter pool. I promise you that you’ll be grateful you did!”

My only addition is to make it the 5 -3 – 1 – 1 Challenge.

The final 1 – Find a chat

Weekly chats might be #TCRWP on Wednesdays or #G2Great on Thursdays.  Monthly chats might be #TitleTalk on the last Sunday of the month.  Additional chats like #TWTBlog may be scheduled after a series of blog posts.

Why a Twitter Chat?

A Twitter Chat will give you an opportunity to “rub elbows” with the experts and grow your own knowledge base as well as your PLN.  You will be amazed at the authors who are available to learn from as well as the inspiration, ideas, articles, and posts that Mary refers to above.

You are at the crossroad.  You must make the decision.

How will you better yourself?

good better

#DigiLitSunday: Summer Slide


summer slidedigilit-button

Is this your belief?  

For your students?  

For yourself?  

How would we know?

What is summer slide?

Summer slide reports what students lose over the summer if they don’t read or write.  Reading and writing over the summer can promote growth for students.  But is that growth equitable?  Does it work for all students?  How much do they need to read and write?  Renown educator and researcher Richard Allington addresses this issue in School Library Journal here.

WRITING

There isn’t a lot of research about summer slide and writing.  Graduate students might want to consider that for an action research project.  What is the effect of “not writing” for a student after they write daily for 180 days?  How could we measure that? This may just be a cartoon but think about this from a student perspective for just a minute.

summer slide three

READING

There are many different infographics outlining summer slide. Which one will motivate you to action?

summer slide repeat.JPG

summer slide info.JPG

What can teachers and parents do?  Ask questions!

Writing:

Decorate new journals

Wonder logs for the summer

Writing stories with your child

Make a summer writing heart map of ideas to write about

Continue blogging – slice of life/ kidblog

Keep Learning Going Through the Summer series – #TWTBlog

Student or Adult Writing Partners

Reading:

Brain Chase

TBR Lists – (To Be Read)

Establish Reading Partnerships for conversations about the book

Set personal reading goals

Start a series (or two)

5 Apps for Summer Learning (not all are free)

summer slide four

How will you share this information with your students and their families?

summer slide five

 How will YOU continue your own learning over the summer?  

What professional book will you read?  

What book study will you join?

How will you model that “love of learning”?

summer slide six

#SOL17: Advice


April is fleeting.  May will soon be here.  How has your year gone?  In retrospect what advice would you give yourself for this year?  What advice do you have for the remainder of this year?

Here is some of my thinking . . .
advice.jpg

First Year Teacher:

  1. Ask for help; don’t twist in the wind when you are stuck! Find someone you can trust to help with day to day questions.  Find someone you can trust to help with instruction/curriculum issues.  (Double bonus if one person fits both.)
  2. Have a Plan A; be ready with Plan B and all the remaining letters in the alphabet!  Plan to learn as you go! Remember that FAIL is First Attempt In Learning and is not permanent.  Learning = growth.  Plan to grow!
  3. Stay out of the drama. Avoid the locations that are filled with drama each day.
  4. Try something new!  Surround yourself with innovative thinkers and doers.  Their creativity and willingness “to do/learn” will be contagious!
  5. Communicate, communicate, communicate!  Use transparency as a cloak that surrounds you.  No teacher has ever over-communicated!
  6. Build a PLN!  Locate like-minded individuals for conversations, collaboration and coaching.  
  7. Reflect daily on your learning.  Plan for each day to build upon the day before!
  8. Do what you ask your students to do:  Read and write daily!
  9. When in doubt ask your students; it’s their classroom!
  10. Be professional . . . in your words, actions, and intentions!

Veteran Teacher:

  1. Write out your mission/vision statement.  WHY are you teaching?  Be honest.  Make it personal.
  2. Figure out when and where were the last three times that you laughed with your students about something silly you did.  If it’s not in the last month, you need to lighten up and take yourself less seriously!
  3. Name three things that you have learned this last week from your students.  What have they taught you?  Or reminded you of?
  4. Check your positivity meter.  Do you hang out and learn from positive people?  Change your audience/PLN/cultivate new friendships!
  5. Do you have a growth mindset? What would your fellow teachers say about you?
  6. Be passionate. Love what you do and don’t be afraid to let it show!
  7. Find your tribe. It’s always easier to build common understanding collaboratively.  Find a group where you can problem solve, share, read and write together!
  8. Do what you ask your students to do:  Read and write daily! Make the time!
  9. Be a life-long learner! For REAL!  
  10. Practice revision in your life.  Know what it feels like to revise thoughts, plans, and actions.

The waning moments of the school year . . . what advice do you have?  

What would you add?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

#SOL17 – #DigiLitSunday – Innovation


innovation 3.19.17 digilit Sunday

Link to #DigiLitSunday posts at Margaret Simon’s blog.

Innovation

Not merely regurgitation

Not just analyzing

But moving on to . . . dare I risk it?  . . . innovation?

By reassembling ideas

Through some thoughtful reflection

Should I attempt it?

If you read my found poem yesterday here, you know that I did not attend the 92nd Saturday Reunion sponsored by the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project.  But I did follow along in the TwitterVerse and even collected my re-tweets here in storify.  There are about 150 Tweets there if you want to see some of the quotes, ideas, and Tweets that caught my attention.

In the interest of accuracy, this is NOT my first reporting on LEARNING when I was NOT at the conference.

My Previous Learning Via Twitter instead of In Real Life

Teachers need to have many layers of skills and knowledge.  They need to be EXPERTS with their content skills and strategies (Knowledge Base – the what), pedagogy (how to teach in an interesting and engaging way), design (why and how certain aspects of environment, technology, and instruction overlap) and in student development (to understand the faces/bodies in front of them each day). Which of those gets precedence on any given day?

IT DEPENDS!

As a teacher, it’s important for you to know and understand the skills, strategies of the standards and curricula as well as your goals for your grade level so the learning targets are crystal clear.  Communication skills must be honed so that students clearly understand the purposes of today’s work and the connections that build every day to meet those end goals.  However all of these are totally influenced by teacher beliefs and expectations.  The teacher has to believe that ALL students can learn and learn at high levels.  And what is it that they must learn?

Learning and school CANNOT be about preparation for the next grade. Grade levels assigned by century old arbitrary calendar years are not working for students.  The goal in every classroom must be to prepare the students to be productive and independent citizens of the world.  So that means no more points taken off for papers turned in a day late (where does that REALLY happen in the real world?), and that students need more VOICE and CHOICE in the work that is done in classrooms on a regular basis. And they also need to be risk takers, entrepreneurs, brave, empathetic,  and . . .

“Wow, Fran, I was at #TCRWP and I didn’t hear any of that?”

My Take Aways from #TCRWP by Twitter:

  1.  What do you value?  How do we know?                                                                                      Set clear expectations for your students. Share your expectations for the students with them and then share what they can expect from the teacher. Here is one example from a reading teacher.  Source:  photo and tweet by Jane Losinger

    portfolio expectations                                                                               Why does this matter?  

    This is NOT the same as My Job/Your Job.  These statements share/show what you, the teacher value as a promise to the students. When I see these statements in your classroom or on your class website, I know how you will make decisions about time, resources, and even daily instruction. I can also make predictions about what I think your classroom will look like based on what you say you value!  Bonus:  This maters because of this Hattie result:

t-s-relationships

2.  Be excited, passionate, enthusiastic EVERY minute of EVERY day!

Who knows when or which connection will work for a student?  If it’s boring for you, it may also be boring for your students.  You don’t have to be an entertainer and an expert at “song and dance routines”.  But you do need to be reflective and consider your impact on your students.  Ask yourself, “Would I REALLY want to be a student in this class?”  Source:  Keynote Address – Tweet by Mike Ochs

      “Come to work every day like it’s your first day”—Drew Dudley

Why does this matter?

The first day of a new job is filled with excitement and wonder.  Share that wonder ALL the time with your students! The students deserve your very best every minute.  There really is no time in the schedule for “do overs” so make every minute count the first time. But also focus on how each student can be a future leader.  Leaders are kind. Leaders are caring. Leaders are compassionate. Teach for long-term transfer.  Know your class well so you can make wise, well-informed decisions that fuel your students’ passions and excitement.

3.  Make the learning work visible and therefore attainable for students.  

Make sure that you have a depth of knowledge about your content so that you truly understand what students need to do for the next increment of learning.  That deep understanding is your own scaffold that you can later remove when students are successful.  Tools that can help students reach for the sky and all those lofty expectations are critical. Source:  Katie Clements tweet

@missalissanyc shares an awesome progression to help Grade 3 mystery readers lift the level of their prediction work.#tcrwp”

progression for gr 3 mystery reader predictions missalissanyc.jpg

Why does this matter?

Students need to have clear learning targets in order to meet them.  They can’t be secrets. They can’t be moving targets.  Clear. Attainable. Clearly defined for self assessment because then students can figure out exactly how to improve their work in order to meet the criteria. Predictions seem like a fairly easy skill but they don’t occur in isolation and need a cycle of predicting, reading/watching/viewing, considering the degree to which the prediction was met, re-predicting (rinse and repeat) with those elements based on both explicit text references and implicit or inferred responses to the text! And to top it off a student needs to be predicting while collecting evidence to help grow other theories.  Reading is COMPLICATED and does not happen one individual skill at a time!

And this bonus from Hattie:

20160930_091010

4. Readers and Writers must be thinkers.

In your adult life are you really expected to be a “fact regurgitator”? Or are you expected to be a problem solver? A creative thinker?  Source:  Tweets from Mary Ehrenworth’s presentation.

“We are not looking for your first thinking, we are looking for your best thinking.”
Create reading notebook pages that open up thinking and develop thinking not tell what you already know.”

Why does this matter?

Thinking in life is not optional.  The twenty first century is leaving the adults in the dust and we REALLY have no clue what jobs will be available for our kiddos when they graduate from school and move into the work force.  We need to stop pretending that we have any real ideas and instead support students to make choices now.  Students need a lot of practice in making decisions and being successful as well as making decisions and FAILING.  That really is part of life.  How we respond in the face of adversity is a true sign of our character.  Let’s support students to be more cognizant of their own need to self-advocate for time, resources, and choices to increase their own learning NOW!

5. Circling back around to values – How are you going to put them into action?

What is your plan?  Where will you start?  What will you do?  “Talk is cheap.” Time is precious! How do you make your actions match your “Professed Values”? Source:  Mr. Minor tweeted by Julie Jee

vision to action.jpg

Why does it matter?

Without specific actions, what will change?  Keep it simple and doable.  Don’t make it another form to be filled out and submitted to the accountability committee for leadership committee for change.  Make it a focus for face to face conversations.  Build a plan with someone else to increase your own accountability!

Ultimately . . .

I am ending with my thoughts after reading many of the quotes from Lucy Calkin’s closing.  I’ve been there. Inspired. Mesmerized. Prepped for action. Ready to conquer the world.  Ready to slay dragons after a day at a Saturday Reunion. And yet I can also imagine the tears shed for our beloved friend, Kathleen Tolan.

Choose something.

Something you believe in.

Support it.  

Work for change.  

The Democracy in your classroom and in the world still needs your voice and the voice of your students who will inhabit this earth for many years to come!

Where will you begin?

Values?

Actions?

How will we know you are using your gift of learning?

gift


Innovation = My application of doing new things as a result of what I thought/believed I heard today in my #tcrwp Twitter Feed.

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

welcome-wagon-volunteer-with-border.jpg

early morning slicer

#SOLSC17: #TCRWP Saturday Reunion


(Not attending the 92nd Saturday Reunion but slicing this Found Poem from the information posted on the #tcrwp website here.)

tcrwp

92nd Saturday Reunion

Saturday’s agenda  –

Drew Dudley,

keynote speaker –

powerful TED talk,

“Everyday Leadership,”

(Ted Talk link)

(Transcript)

over 2 million views,

voted one of the most inspirational of all time.

This day

literacy educators

across the globe

come together

to learn.

Fast-paced day,

brimming with horizons to work towards,

a focus . . .

higher level comprehension,

content area literacy,

units of study in writing,

assessment-based instruction,

increasing student engagement, or

bringing books to life.

You stand

on the shoulders of the profession

with Lucy Calkins,

senior leaders,

staff developers,

Kathy Collins,

Carl Anderson, and

many others.

Riverside Church.jpg

The day begins at Riverside Church,

Teachers College,

free of charge,

without registration.

A gift

to the TCRWP community.


Will you be there?  

Have you been there for the magic of a Saturday reunion?

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

welcome-wagon-volunteer-with-border.jpg

early morning slicer

#SOLSC17: #OLW Brave


The past week has tested my #OLW – brave.  I really can’t write much about it YET.  But I’m here to tell you that last week had some REAL Highs countered by one humongous abysmal low!

Highs

Time with my son, daughter-in-law and 22 month old grandson

Time with my nephew, niece by marriage, great nephew and great niece

Time with my niece, great nephew and great niece

Time with my mother

Time with my sister

Time with my ex-brother-in-law

Time with my sister, brother-in-law and three short nephews

Time with my brother, sister-in-law, niece and step-niece

Time with my brother, sister-in-law and niece

Time with aunts, uncles and cousins galore

Seconds, minutes, hours, days and days!

time

Google images, retrieved 3/13/17

Talking

Eating

Laughing

Shopping

Eating

Swimming

Laughing

Playing cards

Eating

Checking math homework

Laughing

Talking with friends

Time well spent!

One of my favorite roles

aunt

 

Warning:



Lows

Last Tuesday’s news

Calling

Telling Mom

Two new angels

My godson (nephew) and his wife

No time for a last goodbye

No time for a last hug

No time for a last joke

A double funeral

Hug your loved ones

Tell them you love them

Every minute

You never know . . .

Don’t leave any “could have”, “should have”, “would have”. . .

All in! 

Family!


Folder from Funeral Service

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

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early morning slicer

#SOLSC17: 13.31



palindrome

 

                     Day 13 of 31

Forwards

Backwards

13.31

Still the same

Like a palindrome

Like my odometer last week

Quietly it slipped over

As I anxiously awaited . . .

167761

No picture captured

A silent recognition

Yes, I caught it

The miles are adding up!

And then it happened again. . .

Another day or two or three

168861

Miles and miles and miles!

What “word play” do you use? 

How do you model playing with words?


Palindromes for readers, writers, and teachers:

madam

nurses run

stressed desserts

A website dedicated to palindromes

Palindrome poems – shadow poems, poetry soup, and tips for palindrome poem writing

Slicer Dogtrax (Kevin) palindrome / mirror poems

My Post –Playing with words

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

welcome-wagon-volunteer-with-border.jpg

early morning slicer

#SOLSC17: Friday Morning


15 minutes

Every Friday morning I wish I had just 15 more minutes.

15 more minutes to read or write.

15 more minutes to get organized for the day.

15 more minutes to chat with Mya.

15 more minutes to review lessons for my day.

15 more minutes to talk to the kids in the classroom.

15 more minutes to get organized before the weekend.

Oh…. just 15 more minutes.

What would you do with 15 minutes?

What would you do with that hour by the end of the month?

Or is this your wish for every day?


Reader notes:  Today’s blog post is based on Romeo Lit Coach’s post, “15 More Minutes March 6 #SOL17” here.

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

welcome-wagon-volunteer-with-border.jpg

early morning slicer

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