August #TCRWP Writing: Day 3


One goal of writing workshop may be to have independent and confident writers who can and do share their writing with the world.

Any one in the “reader-sphere” gulping just a little at that?  Big, Bold, Audacious Goal!  Dream Big!

So how do we REALLY set students (or even adults) up to be Independent?  Some might argue that this means that a teacher needs MORE control over a student’s writing so that the path is quick, controlled and successful.  But how does that student learn to handle trouble?  Work through adversity?  Persevere?  Does that student ONLY turn to outside sources for validation?

This is a draft.  I repeat, “This is only a draft!” But I’ve seriously been considering this since Monday.  A LOT!

I wanted to write about it yesterday, but I was still thinking!  And so last night with the extra hour BEFORE the #TCRWP Twitter chat LIVE from the dorm across the street from TC, I initiated a simultaneous phone conference google doc with a writing colleague.

Testing the waters.

And yes, only a draft for the third time.

Many of us love partners for student work.  And we have our own partners. Partners in life. Partners in marriage.  Work partners. Writing partners. Reading partners. Thinking partners.

How do we set those up . . . in the beginning.

This idea . . . I heard it, we tried it out in our section and it “felt good”, I read some more about it here, and then I tried it FOR REAL again!

Courtesy of Shana Frazin and Katy Wischow:  Open Conferring Notes

 “Open notes conferring could be a path to greater independence, more engagement, and stronger connections between us and our thoughtful, fascinating readers.”                    – Katy Wischow, June 12, 2015, ‘Turn and Talk About”.

Don’t panic!  Open Conferring Notes are not notes left with the student.  They are notes the teacher takes (his/her accountability) and shares with the student so that the student can SEE that his/her voice is heard.  Students participate in conferences differently with Open Conferring Notes because it is more of a partnership than just a turn-taking typical conference.

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The notes are simple 2 columns.  “I noticed” heads the first column and “Tips” heads the second column.  Writing notes as an adult to share with a student DOES feel clunky at first but the notes shouldn’t be a secret.  After all, the words were real words out of the student’s mouth.  What felt “clunky” was:

  • How many notes?
  • Which notes to record?
  • Can he read my notes?
  • Did I capture that thought accurately?

I know over-thinking.  Over the top.  But that delicate balance between what is said and what is written and am I OVER recording?  YES!

Why does this matter?

Do you have student partnerships confer?  Do you expect them to tackle this work?

Wouldn’t Open Conferring Notes be the “perfect” scaffold to begin to teach students to “share the conferring note recording pen”?

As the conferee last night for about an hour, I loved this.  It felt good to be simultaneously, yet respectfully turn-taking in our excitement as we practiced “Open Conferring Notes”.

Partners

Conferring

Together

Open Conferring Notes

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What have you learned, tried out, practiced and investigated further?  

Open Conferring Notes – soon to be used with teachers learning to confer as well!

Thanks for teaching me about Open Conferring Notes, Shana and Katy!

 

 

 

 

August #TCRWP Writing Institute Day 2


Impossible that two days have literally buzzed past in the lightning round of learning.  Time . . . that enemy of teachers everywhere.

What have I learned?  

The learning curve is high.  

There is always more to learn.  

My blog posts this summer are going to be a bit different than previous years.  “Different how?” you might ask.  “Well, more of a focus on application and less focus on ‘reporting’!”

I am completely blown away by the new “Up the Ladder” units available from Heinemann that look like this because I haven’t just read them or watched the videos. I’ve actually “mucked around” with them and tried out some new work as well as experienced the sequence in the Information book in Shana Frazin’s session.

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Link for additional information from Heinemann

For the record, there is one set of 3 books available that could be used for students in grades 3-8. (And yes, the cover says 3-6 so keep reading please!)  In my five years of attendance at #TCRWP, I have had the great privilege of learning from six of the seven listed authors.

(Any errors in this post will be re-posted in another color with accompanying tweets or highly visible corrections. Unfortunately it would be the fault of the operator of this Chromebook, NOT the technology itself.)

August Writing Institute attendees received a copy of the Information “Up the Ladder” spiral bound book.  All participants have had an opportunity to review  the hard copy.

What follows is an opportunity for you to learn more about WHY these units were written, the responses to the “Aha’s” that have been built into these units. the special features that are included, and how you might consider using these units.

Why did the folks at Teachers College write these units?

 

  • To give students who had never had writing workshop an opportunity to “grow into” this work.  For example, fifth graders  new to writing workshop were struggling with writing an argument-based essay when they had not written essays before.

 

 

  • To support teachers who have not done writing workshop before.  Using the unit in professional development would provide common language for teachers unfamiliar with writing workshop and the Units of Study in Writing.  A new to the district third grade teacher could learn a bit about paper choices and “Small Moments” from the learning opportunities in primary grades.

 

  • So students who are struggling writers  who have had difficulty accessing writing  can accelerate their writing.  This can include English Learners or students with IEPs when provided with explicit instruction.

What has been built into these units?

Staff Developer and one of the authors, Alicia Luick shared these “Ahas” in a closing workshop on Monday, Day 1, of the August 2017 Writing Institute.

The “Up the Ladder” units provide additional support because:

  1. The writing process matters.
  2.  Organization must be specifically “taught” (and no, completing a graphic organizer is NOT teaching! – my emphasis)
  3. Teaching into Revision and Student Set Goals is critical.
  4.  Writing volume matters.  The use of writing booklets pumped up the volume exponentially for students in grades 3-8!

What are some special features that a teacher will find in the “Up the Ladder” Units?

 

  • In each session “Teacher Goals and then Student Goals” are side-by-side.
  • QR Code with video models exist for each session. An author models the lesson (minus students) in 6 -10 minutes.
  • Language is clear, concise and easy to follow  with a 6 page maximum length.
  • The end of every unit has ENL’s – English Language Learner suggestions
  • (and added by this author – The post its for the charts are included.)

 

How might teachers use this new resource?  Some Possibilities Include .  . . 

There are several options.  For a district that is new to the Writing Units of Study for grades 3-8, teachers may decide to start the year with all three “Up the Ladder” units before cycling back to grade level units.

Another option might be for a new third grade teacher (for example), to teach the “Up the Ladder” Narrative and then the grade three narrative.  The instructional cycle might continue with “Up the Ladder” Information and then grade 3 information and “Up the Ladder” Opinion and then grade 3 Opinion.

A third option might be more of a “Choose Your Own Adventure”.  A teacher might decide to use the data from the class “pre-on-demands” to determine WHICH (if any) units or bends to teach based on information gathered directly from the students at the beginning of the year.

Are there other possibilities?

YES!  

Most definitely!  

However, a few words of caution.

“Danger, Will Robinson!”

Go back and reread the section about WHY Teachers College (AKA Lucy and Colleagues) wrote these units.

High Expectations lead to High Results.  

Students don’t hit targets that they have never seen.  Simply slowing down the writing instruction so that all students are progressing at a “slower pace” because the units are “too hard” in a district that has been using the Writing Units of Study for multiple years is NOT a viable goal nor the purpose of this resource.  Providing additional support for students or teachers who need INSTRUCTION  or PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT is appropriate.

This week there is a great series at Two Writing Teachers about “Writing Workshop Fundamentals“.  Check out your beliefs and knowledge there!

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Thank you #TCRWP, Shana, and Alicia!  So helpful for students and teachers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#SOL17: #TCRWP Writing – New Friends – Day 1


It began with a DM:

Coaching institute or writing institute?

And of course, there was no easy answer.

It depends!

Knowledge, background, willingness and ability to THINK

and apply.

Such a pleasure to meet that coach this week at the #TCRWP August Writing Institute and to sit in the front row together,

listening to Lucy Calkins together,

tweeting together,

nourishing our social media connections and

our face to face interactions.

NOT on Twitter?  

Then you are missing out on PD opportunities from your home like:

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And I don’t say that lightly!  What a great morning!  More in another post! (Shana Frazin)

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What was your story of Monday?  What did you read or write?

I know 140 characters doesn’t cut it for some folks.  Being concise is an art.  But check out this blog post by my friend Sally Donnelly who I also met via Twitter and TWT for a beautiful summary of Lucy’s keynote with some staggeringly wonderful organization!  I just have a glorious collection of stories!

Keynote – “Fun with Reading and Writing Blog”

Homework caused this post to be quick and light.  More later!




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

AND YES, My Craft Moves is now autographed by the Author!  Thanks, Stacey!

August #TCRWP Writing Day 1


2:44

3:33

4:09

I give up!

Excited!

Afraid I will oversleep!

Time to read!

Precious minutes!

This was my view at 6:00 am.

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And the morning begins with registration at

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Then off to Riverside Church for Lucy Calkin’s keynote at

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It’s a great week to follow #TCRWP on Twitter to catch the ideas from the August Writing Institute

What will you be learning today?

 

#DigiLitSunday: Possibility


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Never give up.

Say “Not YET!”

Search for other avenues.

Set a goal.

Pray.

Find like-minded friends to fuel your passion.

WHY?  

You may find that your continued growth requires new ideas that match your passion.

HOW?

It may take a plan – savings or otherwise.  It may require you to be “Brave” (#OneLittleWord) and travel alone knowing that by the end of the week you will have 1500 new friends!

It’s all about priorities    

Being a life long learner

And possibilities.

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Today marks the 5th summer in a row that I will attend #TCRWP Writing and Reading Institutes.  Exciting summers where I have grown as a writer, humbled by the craft of published authors, soaking in every morsel of knowledge about writing . . . and reading . . . and creating AVID readers and writers.

Lucky me!

Yes, lucky me!

Lucky me that I have always maintained a “summer” job so that I could “indulge” my learning habit!

I have not been given one single cent to pay my expenses in 5 years X 2 institutes.  (Yes, I have asked and I have been turned down.)  But YET the learning is so important to me that I have attended on my own in order to learn and grow professionally.

Waiting for someone else to fund my learning was an impossibility.   (I would still be waiting!)  Attending and paying for it myself was and still is my possibility and tomorrow will bring my 5th consecutive POSSIBILITY to life!

teachers college

From impossibility to possibility . . . Teachers College Reading and Writing August Institutes!

What actions do you take to move from impossibility to possibility?  

What dream do you intend to make a reality?

 

#CyberPD Week 4


cyber pd

A month of focus by #cyberPD ends tomorrow with a chat with author Vicki Vinton.

dynamic teaching book cover

With every word, phrase, sentence, paragraph, chart and chapter, Vicki has led us through her vision of a Problem-Based Approach in Reading.  I’ve posted about it here, here, here, and here and provided additional links at the bottom to lead you to other resources.




Week 4:  Chapters 9 and 10

Chapter 9 is “Creating Opportunities for Readers to Consider Ideas and Opinions in Nonfiction” and the chapter opens with this quote.

“If you’re purely after facts, please buy yourself the phone directory of Manhattan.  It has four millions times correct facts.  But it doesn’t illuminate. – Werner Herzog (p. 160)

That was the beginning of the chapter and below are three of the teaching moves to support student thinking and meaning making that ended the chapter under “Steering the Ship”.

“Invite students to sort, group, and categorize ideas that seem to have something in common.”    . . .

“Notice and name how writers show us larger ideas through the details they’ve chosen.”   . . .

“Let students react versus respond to facts and ideas in writing and in talk (knowing that facts without feelings don’t illuminate and ideas can be both beautiful and scary).”  (Excerpted from Fig. 9.6, p. 188)

 

There were 11 teaching moves in total.  But these three together gave me a road map to continue to use in our Uprooted book group.   

After bookending the chapter for you,  I now must go back to discuss a quote from this chapter (and new learning for me) that facts in a nonfiction book are not really ideas.

Is this totally new?

Have I ever thought about this before?

Hmmmm . . .

Facts.

Factoids.

Not ideas.

This was a disconcerting quote that I actually missed in my first read because I thought I knew what Vicki was saying.  But when I actually went back to collect the details/ideas, it was literally like hitting the speed bump again.

Rut. Row!

Stop.

Slow down.

Back up!

What did that say?

“… students are fuzzy about the difference between topics, facts, and ideas…That’s because readers don’t really find ideas in texts; they construct them from the details they notice…Readers of this kind of nonfiction (which includes magazine articles, investigative journalism, and many kinds of essays) have to actively draft and revise their thinking as they move through a text, adding on to their own ideas as they do…These cumulative understandings are, by their very nature, more deep and penetrating -and more nuanced and complex-than those focused on readily apparent features.”  (p. 169, 170, 171)

No wonder main ideas for students (consisting of more than a TOPIC) are so darned hard.  They do require thinking and careful study of the relationship between the words and phrases.

So as a reader

I take details

that I have noticed in the “text”

and construct meaning

by actively drafting and revising my thinking  . . .

That’s the root of an idea.

And then, as I read on and continue drafting and revising, these cumulative understandings are the deeper understanding that I am looking for.

So what does this mean?

I listed “details” above in this “parsing” of the quote.

The idea in my head is that

“the thinking I do as I pull details together (maybe in my head, on paper, or out loud) is the deeper meaning that I am searching for.”

AND that

“I will continue to add to, subtly revise, or subtract from these ideas as more details are revealed by the author.  It’s my job as the reader to pay attention to the author’s ideas and opinions and to weigh and decide their value.”

I’ve deliberately over-simplified and even left out the ideas of chunking, reading, thinking, synthesizing, etc. that Vicki so eloquently included in this chapter.  This is my first draft attempt to explain why this is really important! (So if you’ve read the book, please ignore the “holes”.)

It’s so very tempting,

surface level questions

or those already listed by DOK levels,

sound like an easier “go to”!

But what will be the results?  Students who can use the language patterns to locate and answer a question without reading the text. Is that enough?  Isn’t that the existing problem for many of our MS and HS students?


My application and pulling together of “ideas” in Uprooted  (and I am not finished reading) is leading me to think that:

Racism was behind the decision to create the Japanese internment camps during World War II specifically by FDR because of his hatred of Japanese but also because of centuries of  actions, beliefs, policies, and laws that have existed since the founding of the U.S.  (Remember, it’s a draft, and I am still reading.)


Chapter 10 had some great ideas about “coaching” so please read Tara Smith’s post here for additional brilliance from/applying the ideas in Vicki Vinton’s book.

What is your current thinking about the Dynamic Teaching of Deeper Thinking?  Join the chat, Thursday, July 27, 2017 (7:30 EST) to learn more about this brilliant book!

 



Want to join #CyberPD?

Join the Google+ Community

https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/107711243109928665922

Follow #cyberPD on Twitter

Follow @cathymere

Follow @litlearningzone

Or check out the “Facebook page:  Dynamic Teaching for Deeper Reading” here

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Vicki Vinton’s Blog:  “To Make a Prairie”

My padlet with my notes and some details and wonderings – definitely NOT ideas – LINK

#SOL17: Just Wait . . .


What sentences or words caused

Anxiety,

Fear, or

Trepidation

in your Impressionable Growing Years?

Was it the dreaded . . .

Dum, ta Dum . . .

giphy

Just wait til your dad gets home?

It was a dark and stormy night

(Sorry, Snoopy, I had to borrow that, but it’s so untrue

so that’s why the strike through was used!)

Rules

Expectations

Permissions

One memory

That persists

Decades and decades later . . .

Waiting . . .

Waiting . . .

Waiting . . .

Waiting . . .

for Dad to get home.

What had I done?

Nervous,

Anxious,

Apprehensive . . .

Running to the door.

Announcing to all,

“HE’S HOME!”

Then running to get the tools.  It was time.

The house was brand new!

It took an

“Act of Dad”

For measuring, drilling holes and pounding mollies into the wall.

Unthinkable?

It wasn’t drywall.  A nail couldn’t just be pounded in.  A different form of gypsum board.

Not really a control issue.

A forward-thinking Dad who did’t want to spend future days patching holes and matching paint.

“Just wait ’til Dad gets home to hang items on the wall!”




Where do your ideas come from?

What techniques do you use to build anticipation in your stories?  

Could this structure work for you?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

Idea Source:  A one line memory (often-used phrase)

Technique:  Like a riddle, give clues, without revealing until the end.

Graphic:   Giphy search for “waiting for dad”

#DigiLitSunday: #Cyberpd 3


What professional books do you reread?  

What authors do you follow?

When this long awaited book was chosen for #CyberPD, I was so excited.  Time to read and reread over half of it.  Time to share with others.  But what would I share?  It has been so tempting to “summarize” and share juicy quotes and tidbits that have captured my interest.

But here’s my simple message:

“You.Must.READ.This.Book!”

“You.Must.LIVE.This.Book!”

Why this book?

dynamic teaching book cover

Because it truly is about deepening your own understanding of reading as well as considering your own practices as a reader.  Are you, yourself, or were you ever a plot junkie, a surface reader, who is disappointed in students who don’t dig deeper into their own reading?  Who have their models been?  How would they know there is something BEYOND .  . . ?

In this book, Vicki Vinton asks you to shift your thinking to a problem solving mode.  The resources are never ending.  One that I’m focusing on within another book group (reading Uprooted) is this chart about Expository Readers.

Read the title.

Read the title again out loud.

“How Expository Nonfiction Readers Figure Out the Implications of Facts”

And then the column headings.  Consider turning them into questions.  Don’t just jump to the content!  Every word in this book matters.  Trust this author!

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Figure 8-1 (page 143)

What does a reader have to do?

On a second or third reread, I focused on the problem-solving task that Vicki had named under “What a reader therefore has to do”.  I also thought about how deliberate and purposeful she is as an author.  She did not set me up to read between the lines in this chart; instead she set me up to be a problem solver.  Check out the beginnings in that column:

“Look for . . .

Think: . . .

Think: . . .

Think: . . .

Think: . . .

Be aware . . .”

What’s the pattern that Vicki specifically names?  What actions is she expecting?  Problem solving is not scripted.  It’s all about what the “Thinking Teacher” does.   I would be remiss if I didn’t further point out that a question is posed after the “Think:” which is how the reader needs to interact with the text.

Reading is a transactional process.  The depth of my understanding or interaction with a text is all up to me as a reader.  There may be a slow, draggy spot.  There may be some confusion.  The joy in reading comes from one of the key anchors in this text:

“Experience the thrill of figuring things out.” (Book Cover) (More about key anchors in this post.)

And as I was reminded by Vicki, “Think”.




So what this means to me as I am reading this book in a book group that has spanned continents!

uprooted

As I am reading, I am searching for the answers to these two questions from Figure 8 – (above)

“How facts could be connected or related?”

“What do the fact imply?”

And patterns, patterns, patterns.  Where do the patterns continue?  Where do the patterns break down?  So to focus, I look specifically at Marrin’s words.  And these two quotes set the purpose:

“The historian’s job is to explain the behavior of human beings in the past.  Yet to explain is is not to explain away, much less excuse.” (Marrin, p.7)

“The term racism as used in this book, refers to an ideology, a set of beliefs, fervently held, about others and how the world works.  At its core, it insists that God, gods, or Mother Nature has divided humanity into distinct groups – races – with shared qualities. Racists, or those who believe in racism, hold that these groups are arranged pyramid-like, with the “best” or “superior” at the top, and the “worst” or “inferior” at the bottom.” (Marrin. p. 5)

How much do these two statements impact my thinking?

Marrin casually drops one-line statements into a section or a chapter about people who were racist and continues on with his narrative.  This has been beyond jarring or disconcerting to me as these one liners, when first delivered, are often not reinforced with supporting details.  Marrin reports them, moves on with the main focus, and sometimes comes back to a later detail (in another chapter) that shows the connections.  Otherwise, the reader must hold these facts in mind and consider whether they are, “Yes, a part of the pattern”, “No, just a wild statement” or “Maybe, I’ll wait for more information”.

This has been hard.

Why hard?

Back in the dark ages, “nonfiction” was anything that was TRUE, and fiction was “anything that was made up”.  Sounds simple like black and white.  But those lines blur.  Facts that are left out cause a disconnect.  Did the author leave them out because they did not support his/her basic premise?  Did the author leave them out because they could not be “sourced”?  Ignoring the facts is not the goal.  But making a statement 100 times does not make it a fact either.  Where’s the balance?  And that is the key to the “Think: . . .” actions that Vicki Vinton espouses in Figure 8-1 above.

Reading these two books (and responding in writing) side-by-side has given me the opportunity to dig in and try out the problem solving model that Vicki has laid out in her book.  One book is joyous and about all the possibilities while the other challenges centuries of historical knowledge – tainted by the historical storytellers of the past. What I do know is that Marrin’s view of U.S. History is not the history I have ever found in textbooks.  Nor is it the critical thinking that our students need in order to be productive and participating citizens of the 21st century.

Tip:  Read the charts in Dynamic Teaching as if they are GOLD!!!  

Which charts are you going to return to again and again?  

What have you applied from either chapters 7 or 8?

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Additional #DigiLit posts here

 




cyber pd

Want to join #CyberPD?

Join the Google+ Community

https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/107711243109928665922

Follow #cyberPD on Twitter

Follow @cathymere

Follow @litlearningzone

Or check out the “Facebook page:  Dynamic Teaching for Deeper Reading” here

#SOL17: #OLW Check In!


It’s mid-July.

How am I REALLY progressing with my 2017 One Little Word?

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I love that Melanie also has BRAVE as her #OLW because I so admire her writing, her work and her balance of work and home. And I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Kimberly’s Ted Talk – (@onstageKimberly) – BRAVE!  And of course this quote:

brave-olw

A quick perusal of archives finds these two posts:  my January 3rd announcement here and a March check in here that was incredibly sad.  2017 has been a year of changes.

Highs

Lows

And a lot of muddling around in between

Changes

My summer “brave” exploration has been “deep spying” on my response to reading this summer.  Some of my post public work has been with #cyberpd.

Publicly responding to this text . . .

As I read, reread, jot notes, sometimes draw pictures, reread, write, and yes, add post-its.  What does the text say?  What do I still wonder about?  What will this REALLY look like for teachers and students?

dynamic teaching book cover

My focus has been on these two areas:

  • “Experience the thrill of figuring things out”
  • “Take risks, get messy, keep learning”

When it is time for “response to reading”, who makes the decision about format?  audience?  purpose?  

Who should make those decisions?

The standard that is usually “invoked” for writing in response to reading is this:

“CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.9

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.”

Two parts – drawing evidence and then doing something with that evidence – that is the goal!  What could this look like?

Possibilities:

Chapter 5 word cloud from quotes

A. Word Art:  Most Frequent Words

Cha. 5 two

B. Specific Quotes

Ch 5 three

C. Evidence and Reflection

(larger versions here on padlet from this post)

Which version would you prefer for your evidence?  Why?  

A. Words or Phrases

B. Quotes

C. Evidence and Reflection

 

How many ways do you know/use to present evidence?




How can I “show” the thrill of figuring it out?  

How can I “show” the messiness of taking a risk and learning?  

How can I also make sure that student VOICE and CHOICE are honored?

There’s no ONE RIGHT way to share evidence.

There’s no ONE RIGHT way to share thinking.

There’s no ONE RIGHT way to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Have you done this work?  What does your “messy” work look like?

Which domain are you working in?

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slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

 

#DigiLitSunday: #cyberpd


Remember to check out additional #DigiLitSunday posts at Margaret Simon’s “Reflections on the Teche”.




dynamic teaching book cover

The #cyberpd discussion of Vicki Vinton’s new book is allowing readers to respond in a variety of ways.  Check out the #cyberpd hashtag on twitter or the Cyberpd google hangout for additional posts. ( Check previous post here and my padlet here.)

Section 2 begins with this quote:

“Practices are our beliefs in action.” – Regie Routman, Read, Write, Lead

and then Chapter 5 “Creating Opportunities for Readers to Figure Out the Basics” has a quote from General Gorge S. Patton and Chapter 6 ” Creating Opportunities for Readers to Experience Deeper Meaning” has a Mary Oliver quote.  The journey is now about HOW some specific core practices position readers to “grapple with those problems found in texts in order to deeply understand what the writer might be conveying about people, the world, and life.”(p. 55)

Knowing that everything has a purpose in a text, I’ve been asking myself what anchors this text for me.  The “Steering the Ship” sections (Figure 5-7, p. 82, and Figure 6-5, p. 108) are huge for me this week.  The  sections are titled “Teaching Moves to Support Thinking and Meaning Making”.

Did these “Steering the Ship” pages make you stop and pause? These are the “To Do’s” in order to teach reading  in a problem solving way.  They can be prompts for a teacher cheat sheet.  Practice, practice, practice will be required in order to have them to “naturally” be a part of my repertoire that pushes student thinking and provides responsive feedback with students developing the lines of inquiry. But that practice with less modeling and scaffolding by me will enable students to do more of the work themselves.

What are the BIG anchors of this text?

anchor

  • “Create opportunities for learning”
  • “Shift from answers to thinking”
  • “Experience the thrill of figuring things out”
  • “Embrace complexity”
  • “Take risks, get messy, keep learning”

Why these?  They are a part of the graphic on the front cover.  

Which one is repeated on the back cover?

What thinking am I doing as a result of this professional reading?

I am making notes.  I’m trying sketch noting.  I’m reading other blogs and responses.  I’m writing to consolidate my own thinking.  Writing . . . in response to reading.  Writing . . . in order to better understand my reading.  Writing and revising . . . in order to make my writing clearer.

How do you share your thinking?  

What is working for you?




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