Tag Archives: Craft

#SOLSC20: Day 20


Screenshot 2020-03-19 at 10.01.43 PM

I pulled my chrome book out of its case and plugged it in.

Power?  Good.

Connection?  Good.

The scroll across the bottom of the TV caught my eye as a rumble filled the air.

Oh, yeah, severe storm alert today.

WRONG!

Tornado alert.

And my county.

Crap!

I don’t have time for the internet to be interrupted.

I have a Twitter chat tonight and I need to change out two slides.

Pre-tweet moved.

Original tweet deleted.

Message to the team; “Not available for any task tonight.”

Thunder continued to rumble.

And then pound, pound, pound.

Down came the hail.

Bouncing up to a foot off the ground.

Solid balls of ice.

Chipped balls of ice.

Cold.

Dreary.

Dark.

Now, hailing!

Yukko!

Good thing I needed to be inside tonight.

Too bad I didn’t get out in the 63 degree weather earlier this afternoon.

It was a long night.

I put my chrome book back in the case.

It was a dark and stormy night.

When does the beginning of your story match the ending?

How does that make you (the reader) feel? 

Where might you try this craft move?




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this daily forum in March. Check out the writers and readers here.

Screenshot 2019-01-29 at 3.12.16 AM.png

#SOLSC20: Day 11


Screenshot 2020-03-11 at 7.04.25 AM

Flames

Red tongues leaping skyward

A wall of flames

Directed by the wind,

Steadily moving,

Stealthily moving,

Radiating heat.

A wall of flames stretching toward the house

Charred path behind,

Demanding action,

Fast-paced decisions,

No time for fear,

No time to waste.


Process: I began with this line, “I was greeted by a wall of flames about 40 feet long and 2 feet high on the other side of my driveway yesterday afternoon.” from this post. (Link)

Goal:  Build in more description by bundling standards

CCSS Anchor Writing Standard 4. “Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.”

CCSS Writing 4.3.d. “Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.”

CCSS Language Standard 4.6. “Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation).”

Craft:  twin phrases, repetition, specific words

How did this play with poetry add to the description from the original sentence?  How can “notebook play with words and ideas” provide revision practice?            How do you demonstrate/model this?




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this daily forum in March. Check out the writers and readers here.

Screenshot 2019-01-29 at 3.12.16 AM.png

#SOL18: Hello, friends!


Literacy is important.  It’s been a part of my life for years.  Teaching, modeling, teaching, modeling, demonstrating!  And yesterday was no different,

EXCEPT

I was a learner in the audience.  A learner.

Here’s just a window into the learning:

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 1.41.58 PM

If you are on twitter, you may know where I was and who I was with for my learning fun. but if you were not online, think about these quotes.

What surprises you?

What is worth talking about?

What would you say to a thought partner?

What would you write?

Instruction needs to change.  Students need to be engaged.  That doesn’t mean teachers need to do “a song and a dance” every day.  But teachers do need to think about the needs of their students.  And how students’ needs and teachers’ needs can both be met in better ways. Responsive teaching is hard.  It means that the data from today drives the instruction for tomorrow. That data comes from a variety of sources:  conferences, book talks, flipgrid responses, book check ins, student goals, teacher goals, the questions students ask, the questions students do NOT ask, student writing, and teacher writing.

It’s not a unit per quarter.  It’s not a whole class novel per quarter.  It’s not low level responses.  It’s not fake reading. It’s not giving up accountability.  It’s not about abdicating responsibility for learning.

It’s also not easy.

Teachers are change agents

Teachers change the world.

What was the message?

Here is a quick glimpse . . .

 

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.36.17 PM

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.36.47 PM

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.47.20 PM

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.48.42 PM

Who were these masterminds of change?

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.46.42 PM

In West Des Moines, Iowa

About 340 of us . . .

Engaged

Empowered

 Great learning!




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum from Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                              slice of life 2016

Additional Resources:

Literacy Lenses:  Link

180 Days

Sample Chapter

Heinemann podcast 1

Heinemann podcast 2

Facebook page

Podcast part 1 – Read Aloud

Resourceful – Planning

Travis Crowder Review

Kelly Gallagher website

Penny Kittle website

#DigiLitSunday: Craft


Check out the links to other DigiLit Sunday posts at Margaret Simon’s blog here.

Craft:  What is it?

A woodworker has many tools that may range from hand tools like chisels. planes and mallets to power tools like saws, drills, and presses that can aid the process of turning out finely crafted projects.

Is the craft in the “Doing” or is the craft in the “Final Product”?

In writing there are many sources of craft.  Some of my favorites are:

art of writing calkins.jpg

Lucy Calkins,

Ralph Fletcher,

Lester Laminack, and

craft-moves

Stacey Shubitz to name just a few.

So many sources of craft information exist. Do I need craft information along the way as I draft or do I need the information as I revise and improve the clarity, anticipate a reader’s questions, and add additional information to make the work more interesting?  I believe that writers need both skills. The more that a writer knows and anticipates in the drafting process, perhaps the revision will become less burdensome.

What is a teacher to do?  Where should the teacher begin?

Many strategies and craft moves can be and are taught, but at some point the choices used by writers will come down to the individual authors.  Strategic use of those moves needs to fit within the piece of writing that the author has undertaken.  A wide repertoire of moves that fit into a grade level range of writing will come from mentor texts.  Those mentor texts are often published texts, teacher written texts or student written texts.  What a student will use will depend on the applicability to this piece.  Teaching students to “self-assess” and even to “self-reflect” on their use of craft will be important.  That’s one of the  reasons why I believe these items in a fifth grade opinion writing checklist that students can use are absolutely critical!

Development . Elaboration and Craft.jpg

Writers make many decisions as they draft and revise about their own writing.  Tools with visible examples that students can use when talking about their writing or matching to a checklist or a rubric will put the power of writing choices in the hands of students.

Have you equipped your students to be able to make their own decisions about writing craft?  What low-tech and digital tools have been helpful?

How do you make decisions about your own craft moves in your writing?

Hands Down, Speak Out

Listening and Talking Across Literacy and Math

Teachers | Books | Readers

Thirty-One Educators Connecting Students and Books

Educator *Speaker *Author*coach

We have the perfect words. Write when you need them. www.carlambrown.com

Curriculum Coffee

A Written Shot of Espresso

Mrs. Palmer Ponders

Noticing and celebrating life's moments of any size.

doctorsam7

Seeking Ways to Grow Proficient, Motivated, Lifelong Readers & Writers

Doing The Work That Matters

a journey of growing readers & writers

Present Perfect

adventures in multiple tenses

Leadership Connection

from Great Prairie AEA

The Blue Heron (Then Sings My Soul)

The oft bemused (or quite simply amused) musings of Krista Marx -- a self-professed HOPE pursuing Pollyanna

Middle English

Life as an English teacher leader

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas, Strategies and Tools

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.