Tag Archives: evidence

#SOL: Best Evidence


It’s the holiday season and that means a perusal of the cookbooks. Which recipes should I pull out for snacks. the family dinner or any family feasting?  Should I do a quick survey? (Not very robust.) Do I base my decisions on my choices?  Hmm. That rules out chocolate and I already have the ingredients for both peanut butter and chocolate fudge. Do I base my decisions on food for the boys?  That would mean spoiling them with any finger foods as a part of “Grandma’s Rules.”

Or should I consider data from previous years:  What food is always completely cleaned up? Or is there food that I should just plan to make and send with family members? Vegetarian for the Floridians is a given. So is at least one chocolate something/something. And also one item with some spice . . . usually corn dip!

That’s at least four food items. Back to the cook books. Time to reorganize them. The ones that I am not using just need to go on a separate shelf. Hmm. More data. Which do I NOT use?

It’s not a scientific method but there is a collection of data points over time in my head . . . an informal longitudinal study of sorts. Definitely not a random controlled trial. Not meeting any gold standard of research. I can make a chart and list some priorities in order to make a decision.

Food for a family weekend is a low-stakes decision with equally low requirements for the evidence that I need to use.  Today’s post is considering Rule 3 from P. David Pearson’s presentation as a part of an #ILA19 panel titled: “What Research Says About Teaching Reading and Why that Still Matters.”

 

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What is the gold standard? 

What Works Clearinghouse Practice Guides . . . (Link)

A practice guide is a publication that presents recommendations for educators to address challenges in their classrooms and schools. They are based on reviews of research, the experiences of practitioners, and the expert opinions of a panel of nationally recognized experts.

A second source that I can always trust is Dr. Nell Duke.  Her article “10 Things Every Literacy Educator Should Know about Research” is a MUST READ. Every. Educator. in. EVERY. building. link

“To say that a practice, approach, or product is
research-tested, or research-proven, sounds like a
powerful endorsement…but its strength really depends
on how it was tested and what the tests found. ” (Duke and Martin, p. 18.)

Gold standard?  Silver standard? Bronze standard?

Or “Fess Up” because there is no data? 

What is your criteria for research? 

How do you share that criteria with others?




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this weekly forum. Check out the writers and readers here.

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Rule 1 #Headlines

Rule 2 #Research Applied Evenly

#SOL17: Evidence of a Reader


book

Does this sound like YOU?

How do you collect evidence of Reading Anchor Standard 10?

R. A.10. “Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.”

“Note on range and content of student reading

To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essential to their future success.”  Source

How do we measure this goal?

Some teachers use reading logs and activities after reading.  However, those aren’t always popular with students, especially students who would prefer to simply

READ!

Check out this post by seventh grader Paul Sinanis, “Yes, I Love to Read!

Are teacher actions inadvertently causing students to read less?

Students today want voice and choice.  Written book reports, especially 5 paragraph essays, are probably NOT working in many classrooms.  Readers may simply not be “recording” the books that they are reading in order to be spared  what they see as the mind-numbing expectations of an adult.  Expectations that they don’t see as relevant.  Collecting titles and comments as part of a portfolio of a reader / writer may appeal to some students.  But what else can be used?  (This post about reading goals had some options to consider.)

Are you adding book covers to your classroom door?

Do you list what you are currently reading at the bottom of your email?

Do you talk about the books you’ve read?

How do YOU share your reading life with your students?

Are YOU, the teacher, using the same mechanisms for reporting that you require of your students?

How do we know what our Reader-in-Chief is reading?  We have been fortunate to have a President that reads for the last 8 years.  And his reading has been well-documented by the press in pictures, articles, and lists. Check out the New York Times story or  Electric Literature’s summary of President Obama’s reading here for two different perspectives on reading and the President.

What are the possibilities that you could consider?

A top 10 list?

A top 5 list?

A “TBR” picture?

An adaptation of Car Karaoke?

A conversation with a reader?

How will we know that YOU are a reader?  What evidence will YOU share?

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Dana, Deb, Kathleen, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

Close Reading Informational Text? Absolutely!


Back in March, I addressed the topic, “How do I choose text for Close Reading?”   After my “close reading” as a part of this blog-a-thon,  I am comforted by the knowledge that my thinking just six short months ago was not “totally wrong!”  However, I continue to admit that my learning experiences at Teachers College Reading and Writing Project have changed many of my perceptions about literacy learning, specifically the grade level expectations for reading and writing under the Common Core/Iowa Core! This is all a work in progress and is often messy!

I believe that students and teachers must use informational text for close reading as described by Chris Lehman in post # 5 here.  The substance of “instruction” for that close reading will depend on the grade level reading standards for informational text.  In other words, the lens for “patterns” could include any of the reading anchor standards, but the ones I am currently considering for lesson development include:  vocabulary (# 4), point of view (# 6), argument (# 7) and multiple texts (# 9).  Are these more important?  No, but they are ones that I feel a need to explore to build my own knowledge and skill via some “extra practice.”

The “evidence” that I am using to support my claim is from the Core documents and includes the percentages of informational  text reading across the day for all grades as well as the percentages of informational/explanatory writing across the day.  Those are detailed in the following two charts.  Do they look familiar?

Range of Text for Reading:

Image

Range of Text for  Writing:

Image

When will students and teachers work on close reading?

It depends. Much of the informational text instruction may begin in ELA, Science and Social Studies (but probably not all) in the upper grades.  Students will benefit from learning from the “content experts” whose expertise will guide the focus to read and understand like scientists and historians. Some districts and staff may find it “easy” to have staff work collaboratively to address close reading in a variety of content areas including “Technical Content.”  However, starting with a small core group studying and considering thoughtful applications of close reading as well as possible pitfalls will help provide coordination for the student learning environment (so students will not be “close reading” every period every day!)

What length of text will be used?

It depends.  Many of the beginning texts will be short pieces.  However, some full texts will be considered through the use of “Know – Wonder” charts like the one used for Because of Winn-Dixie as described by Vicki Vinton here. Longer pieces of informational text will also be considered if they meet the instructional purposes.  Varying lengths of material were supported by Doug Fisher here because they do allow the reader to become the “fifth corner” as proposed by Kate Roberts because the goal is “understanding what the author is saying and then comparing that with our own experiences and beliefs” (p.108).  We also remember that our goal is that our students will BE readers and writers (not just read and write)!

How is text defined?

Text types are evolving.  Texts are no longer limited to passages with words, sentences, and paragraphs.  What are the texts that will be part of “reading” for students for the rest of their lives?  It is hard to predict the “form” for future texts. The following forms will be considered for close reading:  artwork, video, commercials, pictures, signs, songs, magazines, digital sources AND books! (and examples of student and teacher writing)

Does this match your picture of “close reading of informational text?”  What would you do differently?

close reading button

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