Tag Archives: Five year old great niece

#SOLSC17: Laughter and Kids


When I was young, eons and yes, decades ago, I remember a TV show called “Kids Say the Darnedest Things” that was hosted by Art Linkletter.  If you’ve never seen it, here’s a three minute clip that even includes the most perfect advice for the first action of a President!

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Kids Say the Darnedest Things 2017:  Episode One

Scene:  Dinner in a Mexican Restaurant (8 pm in Knoxville, Iowa)

Cast of Characters Present:

  • Great Aunt Sherry;
  • Great Uncle Wayne and Great Aunt Amy and daughter;
  • my son, my daughter-in-law, my grandson;
  • 10 year old great nephew and 5 year old great niece Nya
  • and me.

(Don’t you love all those greats – it just tells you that there’s a bit of age in this group!)

Back Story:  The great nephew and niece and I have been having “adventures” for about 10 hours that included:  lunch, visiting Grandma, shopping, swimming, ice cream, math homework, reading, Disney Junior channel, football video game, Nya napping, the arrival of my son’s family and then “hanging out” while other family members had “TASKS”.

Action:

We negotiate drinks, ordering from the menu, and food arrival.  In the midst of eating, five year old Nya pronounces:

“When I am old and have kids,

I’m going to come visit you!”

We snicker, shed a few tears, and laugh out loud.

A five year old.

Wise beyond her years.

And who knows who the “YOU” was as we represented Florida, Ankeny, Unionville, and Kentucky!  (Won’t that visiting be fun!)

What does this five-year old know about family?  

What will she be ready to learn in kindergarten next year?


Kids Say the Darnedest Things 2017:  Episode Two

Scene:  Tables and chairs in breakfast area of hotel (approx. 10 a.m.) on Sunday

Cast of Characters Present: 

  • Mothers, Fathers,
  • Brothers, Sisters,
  • Cousins,
  • Nieces, Nephews,
  • Great Nieces, Nephews,
  • Great Aunts, Great Uncles
  • and me, also a Grandmother!

Back Story:

Breakfast is over. Great Grandma Mary and Grandma Pat have been here and have left for Sunday Mass. Various configurations of groups eating breakfast, visiting, eating have occurred depending upon the arrival time in the breakfast area.

Action:

I’m sitting on a chair, nearest the edge of the tables that can see down the length of the hallway.  My grandson takes a few steps down the hall way and flattens against the wall.  I lean out and say, “peek-a-boo”. Without a word he sidles about three steps farther down the hall and then looks at me AGAIN!

I lean out and say, “peek-a-boo”. Without a word he sidles about four steps farther down the hall and then looks at me AGAIN!

I lean out and say, “peek-a-boo”. Without a word he sidles about four steps farther down the hall and then slips into the small concession area!

I watch for about 10 seconds.  His head does NOT pop back out.  I quietly walk down the hall, peer around the corner, and check to see what he is doing. I say “peek-a-boo”.

He looks up, comes over to me, takes my hand and leads me down the hall.  He stops next to the chair I was sitting on.  He points to my chair with his index finger and says,

“Sit. Chair.”

He lets go of my hand and stands there waiting until I sit down.  And then my grandson takes a few steps down the hall way and flattens against the wall.  I lean out and say, “peek-a-boo”. Without a word he sidles about three steps farther down the hall and then looks at me AGAIN!

I lean out and say, “peek-a-boo”. Without a word he sidles about four steps farther down the hall and then looks at me AGAIN!

I lean out and say, “peek-a-boo”. Without a word he sidles about four steps farther down the hall and then slips into the small concession area!

I watch for about 10 seconds.  His head does NOT pop back out.  I quietly walk down the hall, peer around the corner, and check to see what he is doing. I say “peek-a-boo”.

He looks up, comes over to me, takes my hand and leads me down the hall.  He stops next to the chair I was sitting on.  He points to my chair with his index finger and says a little louder and slower,

“Sit. Chair.”

He lets go of my hand and stands there waiting until I sit down.  He continues to stand there.

I can see the exasperation in his face.  He’s thinking,

“How many times are we going to play this silly game?”

“Why doesn’t she just stay there?”

Then he turns and gallops into the area with the couch, comfy chair, the Disney Junior channel on the TV.  On to the next game. Grandma’s no fun.  She doesn’t listen.

Who was the winner?  

The 22 month old grandson?  

The grandmother?  

Who was the most entertained?  

Who was laughing the loudest?  

ME, ME, ME!!!


Where have you found students saying the “darnedest things”?

When you listen, REALLY listen, do you pay attention to nonverbal cues as well?  

How do you keep from laughing?  Should you?

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

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