Tag Archives: found poem

#SOLSC17: #TCRWP Saturday Reunion


(Not attending the 92nd Saturday Reunion but slicing this Found Poem from the information posted on the #tcrwp website here.)

tcrwp

92nd Saturday Reunion

Saturday’s agenda  –

Drew Dudley,

keynote speaker –

powerful TED talk,

“Everyday Leadership,”

(Ted Talk link)

(Transcript)

over 2 million views,

voted one of the most inspirational of all time.

This day

literacy educators

across the globe

come together

to learn.

Fast-paced day,

brimming with horizons to work towards,

a focus . . .

higher level comprehension,

content area literacy,

units of study in writing,

assessment-based instruction,

increasing student engagement, or

bringing books to life.

You stand

on the shoulders of the profession

with Lucy Calkins,

senior leaders,

staff developers,

Kathy Collins,

Carl Anderson, and

many others.

Riverside Church.jpg

The day begins at Riverside Church,

Teachers College,

free of charge,

without registration.

A gift

to the TCRWP community.


Will you be there?  

Have you been there for the magic of a Saturday reunion?

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

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early morning slicer

#SOL15: March Challenge Day 2


Slice of Life

Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. Thanks to Stacey, Anna, Beth, Tara, Dana and Betsy at “Two Writing Teachers” for creating a place for us to share our work.  Stacey’s post calling for slices included this Elizabeth Gilbert quote.

 

Writing 

At least try . . .

Never too late!

Writing will get better

as YOU

get older and wiser.

Write something beautiful

to be discovered

and placed on the bookshelves of the world.

At least try . . .

Found Poem

Today I wrote a found poem.  The words in Elizabeth Gilbert’s quote called out to me.  I originally began with “At least try” but then I found myself back at the beginning focusing on pulling out specific images.  New to “found poetry”?  You can find additional information and examples here.

Welcome to Day 2!  What poem is calling out to you?

SOL14: Digging into History


ImageTuesday is the day to share a “Slice of Life” with Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

 

Where do you live?  Do you consider your hometown to be the BEST in your state?  Or that your state of residence is the best in the country?   I often joke about the fact that I live in Iowa and literally in the “boonies” – out in a rural area, literally surrounded by a state forest on three sides.  My background includes being a “farmer’s daughter” and more specifically a daughter of a “porcine production manager”. (A story for another day about the fact that the pigs who were MONEY had air conditioning long before the family!)

But I must admit that I often have to suffer through bad jokes or questions about being from “Ohio” or “Idaho” as some folks just struggle with knowledge of the Midwest.  Iowa claims:

      • the first in the nation – Iowa Caucus;
      • the birthplaces of John Wayne, Donna Reed, and Johnny Carson;
      • the home of Olympian Shawn Johnson;
      • the birthplace of President Herbert Hoover;
      • Ashton Kutcher who is often seen at sporting events in Iowa;
      • The Bridges of Madison County and
      • The Field of Dreams.

This weekend I was looking for information about the 101st Airborne Division based at Fort Campbell.  I’m not sure that I really even knew what “Airborne” meant in military terms but my research was fascinating and highlights from the Army can be found here.

220px-Saving_Private_Ryan_poster

 

Do you remember “Saving Private Ryan”?  Do you remember where Private Ryan was from?  (clue – my state!) Private Ryan was a fictional character. (But Iowa did also have a basis for a family with multiple members killed in the line of duty  – The Sullivan Brothers from Waterloo, IA serving on the Juneau during World War II.)

 

The screenwriter for this movie, Robert Rodat, saw a memorial to eight soldiers who died in the Civil War and began to write this story  about one week during World War II that began with the assault on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, where three brothers in the same family were killed. (70 years ago last month)

 

Lincoln’s “Bixby letter” was used in the movie as a reason to search for and send Private Ryan, 101st Airborne Division, home to Iowa.  That letter is referenced here and is often recognized in the top three of President Lincoln’s epic writings.  (Although there is some debate about the authorship)

The text of the letter  –

“Executive Mansion, Washington, November 21, 1864

Mrs. Bixby, Boston, Massachusetts:

Dear Madam: I have been shown in the files of the War Department a statement of the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle. I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.

Yours very sincerely and respectfully,

Abraham Lincoln” (Fordham University, Modern History Sourcebook and a lithographic facsimile is available here at Wikipedia)

 

 

Draft Found poem:

Mrs. Bixby
your five sons
have died gloriously.
Weak and fruitless
to beguile you
in your grief
so overwhelming;
consolation
in the thanks
of the Republic
they died to save.
I pray
our Heavenly Father
may assuage the anguish and
leave you the
cherished memory of
the loved and lost
and pride for so costly a sacrifice
upon the altar of freedom.
Respectfully, Abraham Lincoln

(Did you click on any of the links?  Interested in learning more?  Go back and check them out!   Did you learn anything new? What questions remain?)

Many historic events have become the subject of movies and Steven Spielberg has produced some epic films.  What is the attraction to a movie?

Is it the characters?

Is it the stories?

Is it that “kernel” of truth that serves as the basis for the plot?

 

Why do you watch “historical movies” or read “historical books”? 

I love “history” when it includes a factual base with well-developed characters and a fascinating story!

 

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