Tag Archives: Kate Roberts

Reflection: Top 10 Posts for 2016


top 10.jpg

Which of my 131 posts during 2016 were most read?

In reverse order (10 to 1) with a few notes:

10.#SOL16: #WhyIWrite – No More Red Ink!

What happens when a teacher “edits” with red ink?

9. #SOL16: What are you planning to read?

Five books in February that were on my “MUST READ” list from authors: Stacey Shubitz, Kate and Maggie Roberts, Kim Yaris and Jan Burkins, Sonja Cherry-Paul and Dana Johansen, and Doug Fisher, Nancy Frey, and John Hattie.

8. #SOL16: Professional Development

Characteristics of professional development were highlighted for four different “sessions” attended within a two-week time frame.  Are these important for you?

  • Choice?
  • Free?
  • Learning Collaboratively with Others?
  • Available 24/7 to Revisit?
  • Passionate and Inspiring?

7. #TCRWP Writing: Takeaways Day 2

Different ways to share – a symphony and a museum share from Celena Larkey, why students need to write with a pen from Colleen Cruz, letting students lead with mentor texts with Mary Ehrenworth, and “DON”T KILL THE BOOK” with Donald Graves keynote.

6. #TCRWP Reading: Takeaways Day 2

The value of READING mini-lessons with Amanda Hartman, the value of “practice, practice, practice with Kathleen Tolan, What readers need in order to become AVID readers with Mary Ehrenworth, and Matt de La Pena’s keynote!   “Teachers and authors don’t often immediately see the results of their work.  Patience  . . . you will!”

5. #SOL16: Who’s Doing the Work?

Who's doing the work

Have you read this book?  You should have annotated and dog-eared it by now!  This post celebrates the twitter chats (with links to the storified archives) as well as an inside look into many of the activities Kim and Jan developed in their study guide.  How do you know you have “learned” something?  How do you expect students to share their learning?  So many DIFFERENT ways are shared here!

4. #TCRWP Reading: Takeaways Day 3

Learning about the many ways of shared reading with Amanda Hartman, inquiry for developing fluency with Kathleen Tolan, close reading with Kate Roberts and the keynote session with Donalyn Miller. What a fabulous learning day!

3. #TCRWP Reading: Takeaways Day 1

A Lucy Calkins’ keynote on developing reading community, sessions with Amanda Hartman on “one-focused teaching point” and Kathleen Tolan – a mind-blowing small group read aloud.  Never.thought.of.a.read.aloud.for.a.small.group.  And so obviously why I need to continue to learn.  Such a privilege to have been a part of Kathleen’s June Institute.

2. #SOL16: March Challenge Day 23 – DIY Toolkits

Do it yourself

Have you read this book?  You can create your own tools after reading this book.  Better yet . . . study it with a friend and then work together on creating tools.  Tip:  Best part of this blog post is the “summary tool” that Kate created and the links to other pages about this session (Tara, Sally and NCTE).

1. #TCRWP Writing: Takeaways Day 1#TCRWP Writing: Takeaways Day 1

This post includes quotes from Lucy Calkins (opening keynote), revision across the day with Celena Larkey, the power of stories with Colleen Cruz and planning for two or three days of small group sessions at a time from Amanda Hartman. What an amazing first day of Learning for the 2016 #TCRWP Writing Institute!

Reflection:

Data is so interesting.  I was not surprised at the popularity of the #TCRWP posts as the June learning has been quite high on the list in previous years.  Some of those posts continue to be “all-time” highs as well.  I was surprised that the top 10 was split evenly between #SOL posts and #TCRWP posts and absolutely delighted to see that three of the posts where Kathleen Tolan really stretched my brain were in the top 10. I learned so much from Kathleen this past summer and YET had so much more that I needed to learn. It’s time to practice, practice, practice.  I do write more “slices” than any other “type” of posts so I thank my slicer readers for boosting those stats! It was great to reread those posts with a “reader’s eye” as I considered WHY those posts were read more often than others!

What are you reading?  What are you writing?

How do you set goals and reflect on those goals?

And as always, dear readers . . .

thank you languages

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#TCRWP Reading: Takeaways Day 3


And today’s theme across the day was:

fired up

Teachers,

Do what it takes to BUILD a community of Readers!

. . .

Amanda Hartman

Rev Up Your Teaching Muscles to Make Your Whole Group Instruction as Potent as Possible (Mini-lessons, Shared Reading, Read Aloud) (K-2)

Spending more time studying shared reading is definitely NOW on my “To Do” list for this summer as we heard (and experienced) the benefits of shared reading where the teacher has a large text (big book, chart, smart board, doc camera) that the teacher and students read chorally. The three basic purposes that we explored for shared reading were:  introduce a new text, reread a text, or as a warm-up text.  As with many reading components, the amount of time spent on shared reading can vary as long as students are ENGAGED!  And to learn that the time could be just five minutes here or there makes the plan to include shared reading so much easier!

The benefits for students are many.  The most obvious is that accuracy, fluency, and comprehension all improve with rereading so beginning approximations are celebrated.  Students are rereading with their friends so they have built in support from the teacher and fellow students. And shared reading helps build that sense of a community of readers in the classroom.

We participated in demonstrations and we demonstrated.  Just a few of the skills we considered:

  • guess the covered word
  • 1:1 correspondence
  • slide the word
  • the word begins with
  • the word ends with
  • rhyming word
  • clues from the picture
  • cross-checking print
  • retelling – comprehension
  • rereading for fluency – “let’s reread that together”
  • what do you predict next
  • look for patterns
  • build vocabulary

One book we used was Brown Bear, Brown Bear.  This shared reading could end with writing our own book.

______, _____ what do you see?

I see ______ looking at me.

 

If student names are on post its and the class practices reading this with their own names, they are also beginning to get in the repetitions needed for some sight words.  Will some be memorizing?  Of course!  It’s so important that auditory memory gets involved, but the teacher can, by pointing to the words, have students match her pacing!

Takeaways:

  1. Shared reading is a valuable use of readers’ time when students are reading!
  2. Interactions can include gestures and movements during shared reading.
  3. Text variety is important:  listening centers, You tube video with text or Raz kids.  You don’t have to wait until you have little copies of the text!
  4. Shared reading is a safe way for students to “join in” reading.  Not everyone’s voice will be heard the first time but the goal is to encourage student voices to become the voice heard in shared reading.
  5. Shared reading is fun, exciting, and joyful.  What a great way to sneak in a bit of content/holiday/fun that just doesn’t fit elsewhere!

 

Kathleen Tolan

Beyond Guided Reading: Expanding Your Repertoire of Small Group Work in Nonfiction (3-8)

I love that Kathleen starts a bit each day with the WHY we need to be doing this work.  And it’s all about “Just DO it”!  If instruction is responsive we need to have “way more conversations with our colleagues” in order to be more cohesive. “Responding to the needs of your students requires content knowledge and planning! (not showing off tools)”

For this reason, supervisors need to understand workshop and reading processes!  When they are in classrooms, they need to KNOW what they are seeing.  In repertoire teaching, the teachers also need to be specific.  You would hear the teacher say something like “I expect to see some of you doing . . . . and some of you will be doing the work of the lesson.”  Teachers need to be educating supervisors by setting up lessons for “repertoire” in connection and link.  “What’s one old way?  What’s one new way?  What are the two things you will do as a student?  (BRILLIANT!)

Two teaching methods that we worked with today were inquiry (fluency demo) and reminder – definitely coaching light!  We have to continue to know how to help students meet their goals and build the habits of readers.  Again this requires deep content knowledge.

Takeaways:

  1. Organize your small group materials. Have extra copies of all tools out for students with a student as “Tool Monitor”.
  2. Study the progressions with colleagues.  Develop the “cheat sheets” – four levels on a page to be cut apart.
  3. Reading notebooks have the evidence of work towards student goals.  That can be an index in the back.
  4. Make sure that a student does the work during small group time.  They have to be practicing and doing the work for it to transfer. And group time does mean LESS reading time!
  5. Celebrate what students CAN do!  Focus on the CANS! Celebrate all the things the readers CAN DO!  (They already know what they can’t do!)

Choice Session
Falling in Love with Close Reading in Nonfiction – Kate Roberts

Kate began with a bit of background about close reading. What it is. What it isn’t. How long we have been close reading – “since the monks were in caves with candle lights flickering trying to determine the meaning of the divine”.

Witty,

Articulate,

Planned,

Engaging,

Engaged . . .

Learning and

Laughing Together!

If you need background on Falling In Love with Close Reading, do go to Kate or Chris’s blog here.  It’s so NOT boring to do some close reading with Kate.

Process:

Lyrics for:  “Can’t Stop the Feeling” – Justin Timberlake  

Step 1. Listen to the song twice. What would my kids say the message or meaning is?            Listen again and make a vertical list of all the words or phrases in the song that speak to you and go with your current message.

Step 2. Sync up your list with a partner and look for patterns.  What words or phrases are the same?  Use this list of evidence to find patterns (This is the HARD work of close reading.)  Which words or phrases go together?  Color code!

Step 3. Think some more  – what is the message in this song?

Step 4. Transfer to written text.  Practice with nonfiction text.

falling in love

Takeaways:

  1. We do “close read” the things we love – pay attention and even “hyper attention” to those things we love. Let’s build upon that awareness/attention/attraction.
  2. Close reading should be fun and joyful.
  3. Close reading with a song or poem is a wonderful entry point.  It can’t be drudgery!
  4. Close reading is about beginning with the text for evidence.  Don’t leap to interpretation or “guessing” what someone / test writer wants!
  5. An act of close reading is taking the rough draft idea to a more interesting idea for  you!

Keynote  

Voice and Choice: Fostering Reading Ownership

Donalyn Miller

donalyn

This slide sums up much of what Donalyn Miller said to us.  I have so many responses to Donalyn’s presentation:  as a teacher, coach, mother, grandmother, and most of all, as a reader.

I listened to the heartbreak in her description of her daughter – an avid early reader – whose reading life diminished in middle school because “that’s just not so important here” to the joy of being at a Montana reading meeting when Sarah called her, “I just finished The Great Gatsby and I need to talk about it but Dad doesn’t remember it.”  

What harm is being done to students in the name of inappropriate actions, beliefs and practices?  Well-intentioned? Yes.  Mis-guided?  Yes.

To support you, go to Donalyn’s most popular posts.

“Guess My Lexile”

“No More Language Arts and Crafts”

 

“I’ve got research. Yes, I do. I’ve got research.  How about you?”

or to hear about books – The Nerdy Book Club!

Takeaways:

  1. To be better readers, kids need to read every day.
  2. Provide access to books that kids CAN and WANT to read.
  3. Access to books should not depend on teacher’s ability to fund his/her own library. “NO ONE asks the basketball coach to provide his own basketballs.”
  4. Books need to be mirror, windows, and doors to lead readers to connections.
  5. “We are in the hope business. Now more than ever there is a need for critical reading.  For a better world, send more readers out in the world.  It is never to be late to be a reader.”

How are you building communities of readers?  

What actions support your beliefs?  

What is your plan to build even stronger communities that love to read and choose to read?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#TCRWP Reading: Takeaways Day 1


And so it begins  . . . this week I am attending the #TCRWP June Reading Institute and it’s off to an amazing start! This is what my brain felt like about 2 pm on Monday . . . with an hour and a half YET to go.

Exploding head

08 May 2001 — Exploding head — Image by © John Lund/CORBIS

WHY?

Information Overload!

Just plug that CAT 6 cable directly into my brain and let me power on all the assistance I can.  It’s going to be an exhilarating experience!

Lucy Calkins Keynote

Why do we read?  How does reading benefit us as a community?  How does the community benefit when we are readers?  These questions weren’t posed by Lucy but so many questions ran through my mind today during her “Call to Action.”

“We come from 38 countries and 41 states . . . 1300 of you to learn about teaching reading . . . to learn about yourselves . . . to learn from each other . . . From places in the heart . . .To say no . . . To say yes”

TCRWP isn’t just an event. It’s not about attending for a week, soaking up knowledge, returning home, and regurgitating that knowledge to a welcome (or unwelcome) audience.  TCRWP is about the community – face to face this week –  on Facebook and Twitter in the future and even on blogs like this between institutes and Saturday reunions.  If you take risks, are vulnerable this week, you will never be the same reader or teacher of reading in the future.  You will grow. You will stretch. You will fly. Empathy is built day by day.  We can and we must learn and understand by thinking ourselves into other’s places.

Takeaway Questions:

  1. How will you support your reading community?
  2. Maybe we need a new educational story.  To reach, to dream, to grow strong . . What do you need in order to grow yourself?
  3. How can you grow your own version of #TCRWP?  Your own nest?
  4. There’s important work to be done.  It will be hard work.  We as educators are asked to outgrow our own work.  How will you outgrow your own work?
  5. It’s not just about naming the strategies, but inducting kids into the identities and values of READERS! How will you create a safe community for your readers?

 

Amanda Hartman

Rev Up Your Teaching Muscles to Make Your Whole Group Instruction as Potent as Possible (Mini lessons, Shared Reading, Read Aloud) (K-2)

Funny.

Fast-paced.

Articulate.

Explanation and Demonstration.

Powerful Whole Class Instruction for K-2 Students

  1. Clarity and Concise Language
  2. Engaging and Engaged
  3. Assess and Give Feedback
  4. Links and Skills (Strategies) to Independent and Partner/Club Work
  5.  Opportunities for Oral Language Development “

 

Read and Study Mini-lesson individually. (1st grade, lesson 10 – Readers learn new words as they read.) Mini-lesson Practice with Partners.  Mini-lesson planning table group. Mini-lesson Delivery. Debrief. Discuss Goals. Video of Mini-lesson. Discussion of how that was the same and how that was different. Mini-lesson Delivery. Discussion of Goals.

. . . and in all that “What were we studying in the Mini-lesson?

Teaching Point

Pacing – Vitality, Having students think alongside us, Student talk/listen/feedback

Assessment

Feedback

Takeaways:

  1. Whole class teaching – staying focused is critical! Don’t let student responses lead you down the rabbit hole!
  2. Knowing the Teaching Point is critical. Forward, backward, what comes next? What came before? What it looks and sounds like when a reader REALLY does this.
  3. Focus on one Teaching Point. Not a “Never ending Teaching Point”
  4. Growing students means lots of practice.  That lesson won’t have teacher demonstration but will instead have tons of student practice – PLAN.FOR.IT.
  5. Study lessons together. Discuss the work together.  Build your own community to support your learning about the teaching of reading!

Kathleen Tolan

Beyond Guided Reading: Expanding Your Repertoire of Small Group Work in Nonfiction (3-8)

“Small group work is hard.  Our goal this week is to open up our repertoire about different methodologies to deliver small group instruction.”

What is your vision of small group work?  I’m most familiar with guided reading groups but also like literature circles and book club work.

What’s preventing small group work?

Management – What are the rest of the kids doing?

Fear – I’m not good at it! (not enough practice)

Results – It doesn’t really work for my kids. Or took 40 minutes to “drag that group through the lesson.” There’s no time to do that every day!

Today, I saw, heard and was a part of . . .

  1.  Demonstration Small Group
  2. Read Aloud Small Group

We watched Kathleen in action and then “copycatted that exact same lesson” into our small groups with two different members as the teacher (not me, not me!)

Remember that brain on fire at the top of this blog . . . this was the first time I’d ever seen a Read Aloud Small Group. So new. So much to absorb and process.  My mind was swirling. . . Where would this happen?  When?  With which students?  Why?

I had to take a deep breath.  And then another one. The engagement of the students in the Read Aloud Small Group was intense.  No student could hide.  Everyone had to do the work – in order to contribute to the learning. What a way to know exactly what kids are thinking and to “get them unstuck” and moving!

Takeaways:

  1.  On any given skill I could be the top, middle, or bottom. The goal of small groups is to grow and move ALL readers – not just the “struggling readers”.
  2. TC – Kathleen – said that they have been studying small group work for the last year and a half.  It’s okay that I don’t know this!
  3. Increase your accountability for small groups with a public, visible schedule.  That will push you as the teacher as well as the students.
  4. Teachers over plan small group work.  The small group work should be a continuation of the mini-lesson.  It’s not about going out and finding new, wonderful text to use. It’s about more practice – more student practice and way less “teacher talk”.
  5. Feedback is hard.  It is about tone.  It is about the length of the message.  It’s also about giving and receiving feedback.  So very complicated!

 

What new skill/strategy are you practicing?  

Have you found / created a safe community to practice?  

How does what you are learning from your own learning impact your planning for instruction for your students?

slice of life 2016

This is my story of learning.

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Dana, Deb, Kathleen, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.  Writing makes us all more human!

 

 

#SOL16: March Challenge Day 23 – DIY Toolkits


My learning from the 90th TCRWP Saturday Reunion continues . . .

Session 2:  DIY Toolkits for Reading Workshop Teachers!!! with Kate Roberts

Please check out what fellow slicers said about this session:

  • Tara Smith’s blog post on #dothework is here.
  • Sally Donnelly’s notes on this session are here.  Scroll down to “Kate”.
  • And my own notes – Session 3 here from NCTE 15 with Kate, Maggie and Mike

The book will be available in APRIL and I am anxiously awaiting its arrival!

Do it yourself

So I’m deviating from the norm here as I’m not going to recapture all the information from the session (see the links above).  Instead I want you to think about what I heard as the spirit and the intent behind this session, at the TCRWP’s 90th Saturday Reunion.

Kate began with laughter. The whole point of the book that she and Maggie have written is to “make our teaching go better!  Make it easier!  ‘I said it!’”  After 17 years of teaching “every single year it feels like our jobs get harder!”  “We want to raise the bar because our students will rise to the challenge.”

“It has never been easy to teach WELL!”

There is an art to being a good teacher and teaching well.  Now more than ever, all students need good teachers.  How do we do that?  How do we teach the content and meet the individual needs of our students that seem to be a never ending task every year. You have to “Do The Work.”  But you don’t have to do it alone!

The tools in Kate and Maggie’s book will help us. How?

“Tools extend our reach and help us tackle big problems!!!”

For students, the tools put the work in their hands.  They provide prompts so students can and do “Do the work”.

But more importantly, for teachers these tools will also serve as “mentor tools” so that we can create the “just right” tools that our students need.

Will there be a tool for every student? Every situation?

Only if the book is 1,000+ pages long and has perpetual updating.  But what this book will do is provide a framework and enough models that you will be comfortable with adapting and / or one day creating your own tools!  Kate even suggested that groups of teachers should get together to create tools!

This was the second time that I watched Kate create a tool in less than 5 minutes for a topic drawn from the audience. Let me repeat. . . a topic from the audience . . . create a tool based on a request from the audience . . .The sheer recollection of that tool-making takes my breath away.  Kate’s ability to have a conversation with a packed room of teachers and administrators and simultaneously create a tool – a demonstration notebook page – is awe-inspiring.  Here’s what that page looked like as it was developed.

Summarizing

Step one: Draft text

one

Step 2:  Add Title – Cloud like color around it

four.jpg

 

Step 3:  One strategy

five

Step 4: Second strategy

six

Step 5: Post-its  = space for student practice =Final page

three

VOILA!

The goal for the page:

  1. Match the purpose (Increase your confidence in being able to make your own page)
  2. Make in 4 minutes or less
  3. Be visible
  4. Kids should see text as quickly as possible  (My interpretation – not after 30 minute lecture!)

How would a page like this help you, the teacher?

How would a page like this help your students?


 

Process/Goals:

The goal of this post was not to simply recount the workshop content.  I gave the reader two links for additional information and the book that will be released in April. I really wanted to focus on the “WHY”! And then share just how quickly Kate created the demonstration notebook page.  In order to meet those goals, I reread my notes, Tara’s post, Sally’s post and crossed off the “how – to” details for everything but those 4-5 minutes of creation. Truth:  Today it took me longer to locate the pictures that I wanted to use than it did to write the blog post.


 

slice of life 2016

Thank you, Anna, Betsy, Beth, Dana, Deb, Kathleen, Stacey, and Tara. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.  It’s the March Slice of Life Challenge posts are DAILY!

#SOL16: What are you planning to read?


New professional books in the field of literacy are headed your way this spring from the following authors: Stacey Shubitz; Jan Miller Burkins and Kim Yaris; Kate and Maggie Roberts, Dana Johanson and Sonja Cherry-Paul; and Doug Fisher, Nancy Frey and John Hattie.  Get ready for some amazing learning!

Stacey, Two Writing Teachers, has this book out from Stenhouse this spring:  Craft Moves: Lesson Sets for Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts.  Stacey blogged about her book here.

stacey

Jan and Kim’s book (available May 2nd from Stenhouse):

Who's doing the work

Kate and Maggie’s book (available April from Heinemann):

Do it yourself

Dana and Sonja’s book also available in April from Heinemann :

flip your writing workshop

And from Doug, Nancy and John (March, Corwin Press):

visible learning for literacy

Coming later this year a new book from Vickie Vinton . . .

Waiting is so hard . . . sometimes waiting on “new friends” is harder than waiting on Christmas.

Where will you start?

What books are on your professional reading list?

Do you share “your reading plans” with your students?

(*Truth: I have some 2015 books to finish soon to clear the decks for spring break reading!)

Addendum:

slice

Tuesday is the day to share a “Slice of Life” with Two Writing Teachers. Thank you, Anna, Betsy, Beth, Dana, Deb, Kathleen, Stacey, and Tara. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.  Get ready to share your writerly life in one week with the March Slice of Life Challenge!

 

#NCTE15 Involving Students!


A common theme in these four sessions that  I attended at #NCTE15 was the importance / necessity of involving students in their own learning. (It’s a connection that I could make about ALL of my #NCTE15 sessions in retrospect.)

1. Bring Students into the Conversation:  Goal-Setting, Tool-Making that Supports Transfer

#TCRWP Staff Developers:  Valerie Geschwind, Marjorie Martinelli, Ryan Scala, Amy Tondeau  began this session with a “Turn and Talk”.

Think of a recent goal that you have achieved.

What were the conditions that helped you to reach that goal?

Motivation is a Result of . . .

  •    Involvement
  •    Curiosity
  •    Challenge
  •    Social interaction

Tools that Support Self- Assessment

  •     Checklists
  •     Rubrics
  •     Tools created from Mini-Lessons

Goal Setting with Students             and  Language that Honors Choice

And then Val introduced the cycle of learning. . . in student language.

Novice

  • I am working towards a new goal.
  • Sometimes it goes well and sometimes it is really hard!
  • I need my tool to know each step.

Practitioner

  • I am practicing my goal all the time: in every book or in every piece of writing.
  • I use my tool as a check-in.

Expert

  • I can use my goal in lots of places.
  • I can teach other people what my goal is and help them do it.

I loved the idea of the three stages.  I believe Brook Geller first introduced me to the belief at #TCRWP 2013 July Reading Institute that most “students are over taught and under practiced.”  Many students seem to need more practice time with specific feedback and a lot less “teacher talk”.  In this case a practitioner is someone who is actively engaged in the doing, who repeatedly exercises or performs an activity or skill to acquire, improve, or maintain proficiency, or who actually applies or uses an idea, a method, or a skill across many scenarios. In other words, our students are the practitioners!

Practice does not have to be boring.  There are many methods (see picture below) that can be used to reach “expert” status but the key to this entire presentation was that students would be working on a goal of their own choice and moving from novice, to practitioner, to expert.  What wonderful language to put into the mouths of students . . . How motivating and empowering!!!

ncte four

Caution:  These are not stages to be RACED through.  They will take time to develop.  Students in charge of their own assessment of these stages will definitely be students who know exactly what skills and strategies that they do have in their repertoire.

Be the Force!  Help students

  • Take on their own learning
  • Take on their own change
  • Cultivate a growth habit of mind
  • See each other as experts

Tools:  Checklists, rubrics, progressions, charts from mini-lessons.  However, a new look . . . Bookmarks with 3 or 4 choices.  Students marked the choice that they were using with a paperclip.  Clearly visible!!!!  AWESOME!

And then a final reminder .. . .

You’ve met your goal.  Now what?

  • Celebrate
  • Maintain your skills
  • Teach others
  • Get critical
  • Set new goals

It was the first time for me to hear #TCRWP Staff Developers Valerie, Marjorie, Ryan, and Amy and I’m definitely looking forward to learning from them during future opportunities!!!

2. Responsible and Responsive Reading:  Understanding How to Nurture Skill and Will

Kylene Beers, Teri Lesene, Donalyn Miller, Robert Probst

Of course this was a popular session so I was willing to sit on the floor (don’t tell the fire marshal) because I wanted to be able to be up front and see!

Donalyn’s presentation is here for you to review at your leisure.  A very powerful activity included these questions:  “What books and reading experiences would form your reading autobiography?”  Donalyn  explained that:  What matters is WHY you chose the book? Insights from these responses lead to deep conversations with students. Convos for Ss

Teri Lesene’s presentation is here. This fact was startling to me! Obviously I need to read more than a book a week!

ncte professor nana.jpg

Kylene Beers and Bob Probst shared a great deal of information about nonfiction reading that has come from the process of writing their new book. This slide is something I want to remember. . . “when I have answers I need to question”.

ncte beers and probst

And this one on the importance of reading.

beers if children need to read

3. Finding Their Way:  Using Learning Tools to Push Rigor, Increase Independence and Encourage Learning in Your Classroom

TCRWP Staff Developers:  Mike Ochs, Kate Roberts, Maggie Beattie Roberts

Maggie began this session with many great connections. “We haven’t seen teachers work harder than they currently are, YET sometimes students aren’t working so hard! ” Tools can help students buy into learning.  Tools, in our daily life, extend our reach, meet our needs, help us tackle big problems and personally get better! Tools connect, access, build community . . . should change over time!

Struggles –

  • Rigor and motivation
  • Memory . . .  Why don’t we remember things? (short and long term memory) “I’ve taught this 1000 times. I know they learned this!”

“A great coach never achieves greatness for himself or his team by working to make all his players alike.” Tomlinson

ncte five

And then a typical problem from narrative writing. . .  How to stretch out a frozen moment. Kate created a demo page in front of us and told us it was,  “Messy!”  Lean on a menu of ways, decide the color scheme, and title.

ncte six

Another tool might be a Micro-Progression.  It provides a clear description of behaviors that are expected so students will know where they stand.  Middle level is good.  Students don’t always have to think they should be at the top level of performance.

ncte seven

Bookmark – 5 or 6 most important things for students to work on.  Let students create this for themselves. They can be different!

ncte eight

Mike – Framework for creating tools adapted from The Unstoppable Writing Teacher with a shout out to Colleen Cruz.

ncte nine

Do not plan to use a tool forever.  Have  a plan to remove the tools.  Some tools we will always need (the hammer), some we want to go away/become automatic (steps to hammer a nail) Some tools become references, set aside until needed. Sometimes need an additional/alternate tool. Most writing tools are not designed to be used indefinitely.

ncte 12

Kate:  “You find yourself getting as smart as the toolmakers as you use the ‘tools of others’ and you get better as teacher!  You don’t want to teach without a sidekick. Your tools can be a sidekick.”

News :  Spring 2016 a book from Kate and Maggie!!!! SO EXCITED!

ncte thirteen

 

4. Transforming Informational Writing:  Merging Content and Craft

Seymour Simon, Kelly Boswell, Linda Hoyt

I think I know this boy!  ncte 14

Seymour’s part was actually titled: Celebrating the Wonder in Nonfiction Storytelling.  He began with a discussion of what nonfiction really means.  If nonfiction is really “not true” than fiction should be “not real”.  There is something about the use of “non” that marginalizes the texts that are labeled nonfiction.  After all, who takes anything with “non” in the title seriously?

Not much difference between teaching F and NF. . .

  • Who am I?
  • What am I?
  • What about me?

Mystery, wonder, poem, the universe!

Seymour read aloud many great fiction and nonfiction pairings.  One of my favorite pairings was:

Kelly:  How Mentors and Modeling Elevate Informational Writing

Mentor  texts plus teacher modeling equals quality student writing.  When teaching writing, FOCUS!  If the target lesson is about leaving spaces between words, only teach “leaving spaces between words.”  Don’t teach everything in the world of writing.

Kelly’s example for the text went “something” like this as an example of what NOT to do!  “Class, we are going to work on leaving spaces between words today as we write.  What does a sentence begin with?  Good!  Yes, a capital letter. (writes The) Our next word is ‘butterfly’.  Let’s clap the syllables in butterfly.  How many? Yes, three.  What sound does it begin with?”

If the focus is “leaving spaces between words” – that’s the teacher talk!

ncte 17

On mentors and models – read the book once to enjoy, then mine for craft.  Use a favorite book over and over and don’t forget to use it for conventions! Here’s an example from Hank the Cowdog.

Book Review

ncte21

ncte22

  1. Create a culture of Curiosity.
  2. Provide time for students to ask questions
  3. Immerse learners in fascinating informational topics and sources
  4. Focus on content and craft in the writing they see, hear, and produce

ncte23

  1. “Float the learning on a sea of talk.” – James Britton
  2. Teach research strategies
  3. Teach visual literacy – First grade writing example

ncte24

8. Writers Workshop Every Day

9. Make sure learners are writing all day long. Write to remember. Write to question. Write to think. Write to express yourself. Write to share your learning. In every subject area.

10. Write Using Elements from Real World Informational Texts (lists, emails, letters, notes, newsletters)

Involving Students Take Aways:

Students can set real goals and self-assess their progress toward their goals.

Students are motivated when they have control and real choices in their work.

Models and tools aid students in moving through a cycle of novice to practitioner to expert.

What are your thoughts about involving students at this point?

 

 

#SOL15: Celebrating the Little Things


I’m a newbie.

Still figuring this out . . .

This “grandma” thing . . .

It’s the little things,

With the so many possibilities!

grandson

Our list of recent celebrations:

5 months old

rolling over independently

reading (and eating books)

Mama’s red hair

Daddy’s dimple

that baby smell

those gorgeous red cheeks

the chunky, squishy muscles

the first trip to a pumpkin patch

the first tooth!

Although the miles separate us, I have pictures galore that celebrate every bit of cuteness and every single accomplishment!

celebrate

How and what do we celebrate in our classrooms?

Our favorite authors?

Reading a new book? 

A read aloud by the author? (with Julieanne)

A new accomplishment?

Drafting a new piece?

Reflecting on our work?

Considering our small group work? (Kari’s Small groups:  So much more than a level and a kidney table)

Tara’s slicing . . .  Slice of Life year round with our students?

focused learning . . .Keep it Simple, Get it Right from Kate and Maggie’s “Indent”

the magic and the newness . . .  The Back to School Honeymoon is Waning from Shana

and a true treasure from Vicki . . . celebrating The Beliefs Behind the Shoulds

There are many, many, many wonderful blog posts but each of the five above included celebrations of learning and teaching and the oh, so right work!

Have you stopped to celebrate lately?

Are you celebrating often?

How would we know?

And more importantly, what WILL you celebrate next?

slice

Tuesday is the day to share a “Slice of Life” with Two Writing Teachers. Thank you, Anna, Betsy, Beth, Dana, Deb, Kathleen, Stacey, and Tara. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

#SOL15: Digital Literacy and #TCRWP in Paris


eiffel

What a city!

Add in Colleen Cruz(@colleen_cruz), Kate Roberts (@teachkate) and Lindsay Mann (@lindsayman22)

And the first Digital Media and Literacy Institute!

Amazing Learning from afar!

Where do you find your learning?

Do you actively seek out sources? Specific topics?  Do you watch for it in your twitter columns and your blog post subscriptions?

My learning this week has included:

1. Sunday’s #NCTEchat on poetry

“If you missed last night’s #nctechat on poetry and literacy learning, check out the Storify archive: ow.ly/LPpQl #npm15

How are you using poetry in your quest to meet CCSS demands?  Poetry fits into ALL ELA standards!

2. “Lessons on Simplicity from the Reading and Writing Project” by Paul Emerich here.

Consider the content as well as the “length to go for PD” (actually part of the inspiration for this post as well as a reminder of my travel to NYC last month for the 88th TCRWP Saturday Reunion). Do we have to travel to Paris ourselves or can we settle for second best and follow along via twitter and blogs?

3. “Writing Process”  – Kate Roberts

writing processs teachkate

How are the Analog and Digital processes the same?  How are they different?  What are the implications for Teachers and Students?

4. Notes from Day One in Paris – 

notes first day am session

How do you define digital literacy and media literacy? Is this how you organize your notes?  What new “Ahas” does this generate?

5. #SOL15 blogs today

Just beginning to read for today! Melanie has book reviews and Julieanne is writing about Read Alouds!

AND it’s only TUESDAY!

Where is your learning?  Your source of inspiration?

What fuels your lifelong learning?

slice

Check out the writers, readers and teachers who are “slicing” here. Thanks to Stacey, Anna, Beth, Tara, Dana and Betsy at “Two Writing Teachers” for creating a place to share our work.  So grateful for this entire community of writers who also read, write and support each other!

#SOL15: Inspiring and Joyful Professional Development


joyful

Two blog posts this week caught my eye and lingered in my brain.  They were Jessica Lifshitz’s “A Different Kind of PD (AKA Thank You Kate Roberts and Chris Lehman)” linked here and Lisa Saldivar’s “Assigning vs. Teaching” here.  Jessica is a 5th grade teacher in Chicago and Lisa is an Elementary ELA Coordinator in Los Angeles.

How do I know Jessica and Lisa?  I follow them on Twitter and they participated in online chats last week.

How did I find out about their blogs?  The links were both tweeted out on Twitter.

Have I ever met them? No, not YET!

 Stop for a second.  

What was the content of the  last Professional Development session where you left energized, inspired and ready to move forward with implementing the learning?

Energy, enthusiasm and excitement were present in both their posts.   The three presenters referenced above, Kate Roberts, Chris Lehman (Falling in Love with Close Reading), and Cornelius Minor, are awe-inspiring and passionate about increasing literacy learning for students without drudgery.  They are also FUN to listen to in a PD setting!  You can hear Cornelius Minor in a podcast here.  If you haven’t yet seen them in person, you need to add them to your “must do” list!

joy

 

Focus:  What is professional learning?

I shared this model back in September because the work of Joyce and Showers is embedded in the thinking and development of this model that has “Student learning – at the center of school improvement and staff development”!  (Research-based, YES! and a model of how good things can be!)

Iowa PD Model

You can read more about the model here and also about CCSS.Writing Anchors 1-3 here for content of a two hour PD session with absolutely 0 power point slides but a lot of talk and “studying of texts”. Teachers had the opportunity to read new/revisit familiar texts to deepen their understanding of writing techniques and build a common language, K-5, across argument, informational and narrative texts.

 Where can you find joyful and inspiring PD on your own?

There are many quality sources of PD.  I encourage you to leisurely explore the following resources until you find one that you cannot live without!  Additional details are listed for:  blogs, twitter hash tags, twitter book chats, twitter blog chats, scheduled Twitter chats, and face-to-face presentations.

1. Blogs

blog

Reading a steady diet of blogs can inform your work.  Leaving comments on the blogs can also lead to conversations and even other blogs you might want or need to follow!

Must read literacy blogs include:

 

 2. Twitter hashtags

twitter-logo-bird

Twitter hashtags begin with the “#” sign and can be real or made up. Some hashtags exist for a long time (not saying forever because who REALLY  knows what “forever” means in the “TwitterVerse”) or they can be hashtags created for a specific event (and possibly linger after through posts/discussions).

Examples for meetings / conferences:

#NatRRConf  – National Reading Recovery Conference

#WSRA15  – Wisconsin Reading Association 2015 Conference

#NCTE14  – National Council of Teachers of English 2014 Conference

Examples of enduring hashtags (may want to have a dedicated column in Tweetdeck or Tweetchums):

#tcrwp – Teachers College Reading and Writing Project

#wonderchat – Wonder Chat

#tlap – Teach Like a Pirate

3. Twitter Book Chats

Twitter Book Chats are on line discussions of books (often with questions posted in advance in a google document) where readers and lurkers meet to answer questions and grow their own knowledge.  Powerful twitter book chats often include the authors responding to the questions as well!

#filwclosereading – Falling in Love with Close Reading (book and presentations by @teachkate and @ichrislehman linked above)

#wrrdchat – What Readers Really Do by Dorothy Barnhouse and Vicki Vinton

#NNNchat – Notice and Note @kylenebeers and @bobprobst

#wildreading – Donalyn Books

#booklove – Penny Kittle

#G2Great – Good to Great  @DrMaryHoward

4. Twitter Blog Chats

Twitter Blog Chats are often used to introduce an upcoming series of blog posts or to even wrap up a series of blog posts where the readers can interact with the blog authors.

Examples:

#TWTBlog – Aim Higher:  Outgrow old goals  and set new ones with the chat archive here

#T4Tchat – sponsored by Teachers for Teachers with the last chat storified here – Mid-Year Assessments Got You Down?

5.  Scheduled Twitter Chats

#tcrwp – Teachers College Reading and Writing Project  (Wed. 7:30 pm EST)

#educoach –  Educational Coaches (Wed. 9:00 pm CST)

#titletalk –  Promote reading and book titles that engage students (Last Sunday of each month from 8-9 pm EST)

#iaedchat – Iowa Educators (Sundays 8 am and 8 pm CST)

Many content areas and grade levels host their own chats – check out this list! (36  chats on the list last night between 5:30 and 10:00 pm!)

6.  Face to Face Presentations

face to face

Face to Face Presentations are often jazzed up to include a hashtag so participants can follow along or a back channel like “Today’s Meet” where participants can be posting favorite quotes or questions in real time while the session is taking place.  Today’s Meet is often used when there are multiple presenters so the non-presenter is monitoring the channel to feed to other partners/panel members or to address /build purposeful connections for all parts of the presentation.

Which of these 6 have you used to find your own joyful and inspiring professional development?  

What about your peers?  Where do they find joyful and inspiring PD?

(If you didn’t answer these questions in three seconds or less, click on a link above and find something you are interested in . . . NOW!!!)

 

Tuesday is the day to share a “Slice of Life” with Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. Thanks to Stacey, Anna, Beth, Tara, Dana and Betsy for creating a place for us to share our work.

#SOL15: Wrapping up 2014 and Studying my Writing Process


Last week was a big week for writing assessments as well as professional development planning.  I was also working on some planning for future demonstrations. . . typical multi-tasking for a fairly typical week!  I actually kept a post-it open on my desktop to keep track of my writing process for this blog because it was the purest “creation” that I was developing.  Most of the other pieces were revisions or combinations of other past work.

The picture below from Jan Burkins and  Kim Yaris fascinated me last week!  Stop and read that blog about the writing process if you haven’t yet, because there is so much wisdom about what each of these “steps” really looks like!  Not every single second of writing is visible so take a deep breath and consider your own writing process as you develop a piece of writing from planning to publication.

My mini-research:  Does my writing parallel this?

wring process burkins and yaris

What was my topic for this next slice?  

I had spent some time in December looking at my blog data and wondering what my top blog posts were for 2014 when I wrote an average of two posts per week or at least one “slice” each week as well as a daily “slice” during March.

To begin my planning for this post, I went to my data to double check the top five blog posts and then created this table in Word. After previewing it, I decided that I didn’t like the “picture of the table” so I went with a word version so the links would be clickable. This caused a major discussion with myself about how I would classify adding links to the table. Was that Revision or Editing?  (I went with editing due to “surface changes”!)

5 #TCRWP Day One: Reading Institute
4 #TCRWP:  Informational Writing Goals
3 #TCRWP and a Teacher’s Toolkit for Teaching Writing
2 Lexile Level is NOT Text Complexity CCSS.R.10
1 Close Reading in Kindergarten?  Is it Possible?

My top topics for 2014 were:  Close Reading, Text Complexity, and #TCRWP Writing (2) and Reading (1). . . a mixed list.  Looking back at blog data for previous years revealed that “Close Reading in Kindergarten?  Is it Possible?” was also my top blog post for 2013.  (As a side note “Close Reading and the Little Ones” was also a great presentation at #NCTE14 by Chris Lehman, Kate Roberts, and Kristi Mraz. Check out Catherine Flynn’s post here about the presentation and how she used it.)

I learned two things about my process for writing blog posts.

1) I keep a list of possible blog topics.  By the time a topic is put on this list, I have already begun the pre-writing process.  I’m not sure that I can accurately record how often I work on “prewriting” because the list often includes two or three specific ideas about the topic.

2) I needed to add another step to the writing process.  Sometimes I do collect some information/evidence collaboratively with others.  However, that is NOT the step that I added as I developed this post. This post included both a picture and a table import with multiple opportunities to “check” or “preview” my work.  I included that as another step in the writing process.  Typically, I try to check to see what my post looks like on both a PC and a Mac because it is never the same.  Maybe the “preview” is important because I worry about the “publish” button.  It is still scary to push that button and then see that my post  does not match my “vision” for writing.

So here’s my best representation of my process for writing this blog post.

my writing process

Does everyone use the same exact process?

What does your writing process look like?

What are the implications for your students?

Tuesday is the day to share a “Slice of Life” with Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. Thanks to Stacey, Anna, Beth, Tara, Dana and Betsy for creating a place for us to share our work.

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