Tag Archives: Keynote

#TCRWP 19: Day 2 Reading


Reading Habits and Habits of Mind continue to be a thread that run through my learning at TCRWP at the 2019 August Reading Institute.  Just as we ask students to follow and hold onto ideas across a text or multiple texts so do we build theories and hold onto ideas across sessions, days and the week’s learning. Tuesday’s keynote with Mary Ehrenworth was a perfect example.  ” Supporting Kids as Social Learners Through Partnerships, Clubs and Study Groups.”

Screenshot 2019-08-14 at 5.34.49 AM.png

This quote Mary shared from Pedro Noguera is on my mind because, of course peer culture wins because of the strength of the bonds.  So why don’t we use that social capital as we think of all the “things” that our students must navigate. Here are some real-life needs for our students.

Screenshot 2019-08-14 at 5.36.56 AM

These don’t always show up in a curriculum guide. They aren’t necessarily in “the standards.”   But yet aren’t they real life situations that students need to be able to navigate?  When do we teach into them?

When do we talk about “social capital” and Malcolm Gladwell?  When do we bring in Alfred Tatum’s,  “We have to role-play kids into academic identities”? How do we combine the best of worlds?

Partnerships are key in the day to day implementation of both the Reading Units of Study and Writing Units of Study. For students and teachers.

We lean on partnerships in real life. Our marital partners. Our work partners. Our writing critique partners. Our book club partners.

Mary Ehrenworth shared that typically partnerships are formed on the basis of one of these types:

  1. Friendship
  2. Mentor
  3. Leveled
  4. Interest

Stop for just a second. 

Which do you rely on in your life on a regular basis?

Which ones have created life long bonds? 

Which ones do you regularly use in classrooms?

List out the strengths and concerns of all four types in order to decide which ones you should use and where.  But do add in . . .

Student view and perception. Take a 360 degree and inside/outside view!

Mentor Partners are a favorite in many classrooms.  But what if they do not lead to “increased independence”?  Mary quoted from Peter Johnston’s Choice Words, “Every time you solve a problem for a student, you make them co-dependent. If they solve for themselves they are interdependent.”

Leveled Partner discussions bring in questions of equity and of course how those partnerships are determined.  (What data?  Accurate data?  Data that is worthwhile?) When using leveled partners, make sure that students are not “isolated so they have no coalition.  This applies to kids at both ends, low and high kids.”

Interest Partners are often used with data coming from an interest inventory at the beginning of the year.  Is that inventory still accurate three months into the year?  Or were those the quick responses or choices that students have now outgrown?  Mary encouraged us to not overlook the multitude of data sources that we have available.  Here’s just one post it about writing workshop.

Screenshot 2019-08-14 at 5.35.27 AM

And of course, it came with a twist.  Use on-demand writing. Definitely.  But not the scores for structure, development, and conventions.  Use the student writing to figure out what this student knows, is interested in, and writes at length about.  We looked at student samples to consider what social capital situations the students were navigating (remember the first chart) and to think about how partnerships might be formed.

Friendship Partners

How do they work?  When do they not work?

Are we sometimes hasty to dismiss them as “outside the classroom partners”?  How can the words and work of Pedro Noguera, Malcolm Gladwell, Alfred Tatum, and Peter Johnston connect with actual research by TCRWP staff developers?

Screenshot 2019-08-14 at 5.36.36 AM

Emily’s tweet about friendship partnerships gave me more to think about as I revisited my notes.  What if we used the existing “friends” partnerships to shape “academic” partnerships?  What would be the benefits for students?

As the week continues, I am going to think about partnerships here at the Institute and out in the world.  I’m going to add in thinking about that layer of social capital and goal of independence as I wonder about teaching partnerships.

How are they formed? 

When are they most successful? 

What are the “things” that teachers navigate?

#SOL19: Day 18 SOLSC


“Oh, you were going down,” the maid commented. She pushed the button for a higher floor.

I remained silent.  “Should I use my typical Iowa spiel? ‘Well, I live in a town that doesn’t have any buildings taller than two stories.'”

Nah. Silence. No excuse. Too early!

The elevator dinged to announce its arrival. I moved to the elevator bank that was lit. I didn’t remember if it was a

D

O

W                                               P  arrow.

N  arrow or an       U

Simply too late to matter.

By the time all my thinking was done, the elevator was going down, down to my destination. Trivia. Let it go!

Tell Your Story . . .

Shanna Schwartz is a master storyteller and she delivered a powerful keynote when she used stories to offer tips to help teachers, coaches, and administrators in Cowin Auditorium understand what will make TEACHING STICK.

Old School . . .

Screenshot 2019-03-17 at 3.52.04 PM

I noted and appreciated the delivery of the keynote. . .  Stories, a  document camera, and anchor charts created in front of us.  No powerpoint, google slides or Prezi.  These were the presentations I remember from the first sessions I attended at #TCRWP Institutes. (Lucy Calkins also addresses the atmosphere and delivery of mini-lessons in Leading Well.)

Three memorable quotes . . .

STUDENTS

Children like all humans do not just learn things whole and then do it perfectly. They do it partially, making approximations, and gradually showing more learning.” (Shanna B Schwartz, 3.16.19. TCRWP) (Check out her book for the exact wording.)

TEACHERS

“Have to be planned enough so I can watch students, to know what to do, and be flexible enough to change to meet kids needs!” (Shanna B Schwartz, 3.16.19. TCRWP)

TEACHING

“Sometimes teaching feels like a performance. Teaching should be a relationship, a warmth, and closeness that you are building together.” (Shanna B Schwartz, 3.16.19. TCRWP)

Timeless . . .

One of Two Keynotes at the #TCRWP 96th Saturday Reunion was “Making Your Teaching Stick” by Shanna Schwartz.

Screenshot 2019-03-17 at 3.53.45 PM.png

Shanna referred to this book (as did Sarah Picard Taylor in her introduction of Shanna) that she wrote 11 years ago as a base for her keynote.  It might be a quick book to pull out and review with your staff. Every single book from the Help Desk series has tips worth revisiting and the price is right.

So when something isn’t right in life, do you choose silence as I did on the elevator or do you study the situation in order to figure out alternatives?  If it’s a short interval, time may solve the issue.  But what if it isn’t?  Then what do you choose to do?  What is your default?  Your knowledge? Your skill set? What stories do you lean on?

What are the principles that you hold onto dearly? 

How do you deliver your instruction (and your PD)?

What are the areas you continually return to for problem solving because they don’t seem “to stick”?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this daily March forum from Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.

Screenshot 2019-01-29 at 3.12.16 AM.png

#TCRWP 95th Saturday Reunion


Sad

sad

sad

sad

sad

Still not out of my system, but moving on!

A search of my own blog posts showed that I attended the 88th, 89th, and 90th in a row.

Fall Saturdays are so problematic with so many events.

Last week’s issues with Hurricane Michael and flights was an unexpected glitch.

Whether it’s your first or too many to count . . .

Enjoy!

Find the fun!

Find something new!

Don’t just stick

With the tried and true!

Find an online friend

Say hello face to face

Say hello to strangers

Make new friends as you race

From session to session

Learning at a speed of light pace.

No one

Does it better.

50 minutes

of learning.

Encapsulated

In Connections,

Teaching Points,

Teaching,

Active Engagement,

And a link.

Units of Study

Writing

Reading

Phonics

and new best friends Rashid and Mabel.

Riverside Church

Kate DiCamillo

TCRWP Staff Developers

Teachers, Administrators, and Authors

by the droves . . .

Enjoy!  Learn!  Enjoy!  Laugh!  Enjoy!  Make New Friends!

Screenshot 2018-10-19 at 2.34.40 PM.png

teachers college

 

August #TCRWP Reading: Day 1


Screenshot 2017-08-07 at 1.31.01 PM

Monday arrives with rain and yet the fire in my brain flames on . . .

Lucy Calkins keynote . . .

Laughter with Natalie Louis . . .

Learning with Kelly Boland Hohne

Illumination with Cornelius Minor

Such was the Monday in my life!

Today’s post is a recap of information from Cornelius Minor from his closing session: “Using Digital Tools to Offer Access to Students with IEPs”

Access for all Kids – Why is Access Important?  (AKA “Research to Weaponize”) 

  •        UdL – more inclusive
  •        On heels of Civil Rights
  •        Architects – ADA compliant – door width, door knob  (designed from inception)
  •        Knowledge of the three networks that access the brain:
    • Recognition (input – see, hear, perceive);
    • Strategic (executive functioning); and
    • Attitude (and feelings about teacher and learning)

 

Here is a chart I developed to organize some of the information shared by Cornelius.

                                                             What is the main thing?  
Skills Instruction
Vocabulary

Alfred Tatum – Teaching Reading to Adolescent Black Boys  (Chicago) (EL)
Start with verbs – most common  (not ameliorate)  to speak, to move, to think

Build on strengths!

Synonyms:  Ponder, saunter, exclaim – derivatives of most common words.

Camera  saunter A , B photographer

Video ponder B, A videographer

Develop criteria together.

Make pic for word wall – Use students in the class

Social – Doing and Talking

Fluency

The sound of my voice when I am reading text I care about.  (have to like my audience as well as my text)

Teen ink  is a source

“The day I met you was a bad hair day”

Need texts that are worthy of practice.

“Going to play Simon says. You are going to read the poem like I do!”

3 different emotions:

  1. “You just ate the last Dorito” and I wanted it
  2. “Cutest baby” – change voice to match your meaning
  3. Accused, but didn’t throw paper ball!

   Annotate text for emotion

Specific Chrome Tools

  • Announcify
  • Read and Write for google
  • Ginger – grammar checker
  • Google dictionary – define and save
  • Text compactor – summary
Have 3 or 4 that are extremely effective.

More is NOT better.

Can also change readability

Effort

Behavior mirror

Transfer – Use contexts that are familiar – Audio / Video – Students use daily!

Do what the leader does!  SELL it!

Effort lives in our methodology.

What was something tried and true?  

What was new?  

What will you do next?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      slice of life 2016

Teachers | Books | Readers

Thirty-One Educators Connecting Students and Books

Educator *Speaker *Author*coach

We have the perfect words. Write when you need them. www.carlambrown.com

Curriculum Coffee

A Written Shot of Espresso

Mrs. Palmer Ponders

Noticing and celebrating life's moments of any size.

doctorsam7

Seeking Ways to Grow Proficient, Motivated, Lifelong Readers & Writers

Doing The Work That Matters

a journey of growing readers & writers

Present Perfect

adventures in multiple tenses

Leadership Connection

from Great Prairie AEA

The Blue Heron (Then Sings My Soul)

The oft bemused (or quite simply amused) musings of Krista Marx -- a self-professed HOPE pursuing Pollyanna

Middle English

Life as an English teacher leader

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas, Strategies and Tools

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.

I Haven't Learned That Yet

This blog serves to document my path of learning and teaching.