Tag Archives: NCTE

@ILAToday Literacy Leadership Brief: Children Experiencing Reading Difficulties


Today is a day to celebrate another #ILA Literacy Leadership Brief.  This one is titled Children Experiencing Reading Difficulties: What We Know and What We Can Do and it has many implications for students, teachers, and school communities.

In its entirety . . . here

As announced by @ILAToday . . .

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What are your takeaways? 

What did this affirm? 

What questions remain?

Where are you sharing this?




Additional ILA Resources:  Link

NCTE Position Statements: Link

NCTE:  Act of Reading: Instructional Foundations and Policy Guidelines  link

Reading Recovery: Responding to the Reading Wars Link  

Reading Recovery: Offering a preventative intervention for young children learning literacy. psychologytoday.com/us/blog/psyche…

Richard Allington “The Hidden Push for Phonics Instruction” (TN Literacy Journal) tiny.cc/s6hbhz

Lucy Calkins:  No One Gets to Own the Term “The Science of Reading” – Link

Paul Thomas – Mississippi Miracle or Mirage?  Link

#WhyIWrite19


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After 738 posts on this blog, I am a writer who puts marks on paper for so many reasons. Some days I celebrate stories of joy, family events, and life. Some days I invite learning: new ideas, clarification of previous learning, or to synthesize the thinking after learning. Some days I review and revise my own ideas, updating a post or adding in new ideas, thoughts, and applications. Some days I share resources and books that are a match to my current understanding of reading or writing.  And some days I write because of a compulsion to open up the faucet of ideas and let them flow.

Writing as a process takes many forms. Some are familiar and comfortable, while others are still stiff and rigid. Defaulting to poetic forms means that I can avoid rules of correctness and conventions that seem so stifling. When the goal is expression, rules become the fog in the brain that STOPS production. Frozen – unable to move forward or backward. Time stolen away, minute by minute, until the fear of “incorrectness” or death by “red ink” recedes. Unrecoverable time. Time lost unnecessarily because there is no one process, no one way to research, no one way to put marks on the paper!

Today is the National Day on Writing. You can read more about it here including an interesting fact about how much email writing an average office worker does in a year or just check out writing trivia.

Why do you write?

Why does writing matter?

#SOL17 and #DigiLitSunday: Learning?


 

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Today’s Topic: A Burning Question

 

 

 

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More posts with Margaret Simon here

 

Who is learning and how do we know?

Are the students learning?

How do we know?

What can they tell / show us about what they can do NOW that they could not do before instruction?

Is the learning important enough that the student will use “this” the rest of his/her life (beyond school)?

Am I learning?

How do you know?

You can search my blog for the following topics and see my learning:

TCRWP

NCTE

ILA

Shouldn’t our learning be public?  

Shouldn’t we have multiple pieces of evidence about our learning?

(Hint:  It does not have to be a number.)  

How are you sharing your learning?

What is your “Burning Question”?


Learning a new device has kept this post brief, but I conquered “Where do downloads go on a chromebook?”, inserted a picture, and posted it all with this new chromebook!


Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.

#SOLSC and #DigiLitSunday


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This week’s theme for #DigiLitSunday is “Slicing our lives”.  Head on over to Margaret Simon’s “Reflections on the Teche” for additional posts.

Slicing our lives is what many bloggers do each Tuesday throughout the year.  But when March arrives (whether like a lion or a lamb), it’s time for the “Story Challenge” where bloggers write each day of the month.  So that’s 31 consecutive posts to write as well as to respond to fellow bloggers in the community!  This year is the 10th annual SOLSC so that’s a whole lot of stories.

Why Slice?

It’s an opportunity to write stories every day and live a more writerly life . . . in public. Sharing stories allows us to build a community of writing friends.  Perhaps in the first year of slicing, you only read the posts of those persons who post just before and after you.  But after a while, you branch out and look for those who write about similar topics, teach the same grade, have similar jobs, people you follow on Twitter or those you have met in real life (IRL) or face to face (F2F).

What is a community?

It’s often considered to be a group of people joined together for a common purpose or passion.  Today I celebrate both the Slice of Life Community and the DigiLitSunday Community. Friends from around the world that I rely on when I’m looking to learn more.  Friends that I often meet in both the blogosphere and the Twitterverse.  Friends with whom I enjoy spending time!

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Members of both communities that I have met face to face at NCTE and/or TCRWP Institutes or Saturday Reunions include:

  • Margaret Simon
  • Tara Smith
  • Carol Versalona
  • Julianne Harmatz  (We even presented on a panel together at NCTE15!)

Slice of Life Community members that I have met face to face at NCTE and TCRWP (Institutes and / or Saturday Reunions)

  • Stacey
  • Dana
  • Betsy
  • Deb
  • Michelle
  • Melanie
  • Lisa
  • Catherine
  • Paula
  • Glenda

Slicers that I have met face to face at TCRWP Institutes or Saturday reunions:

  • Sally
  • Erika
  • Phyllis
  • Lanny
  • Dayna

Slicers that I have met face to face at ILA or NCTE:

  • Clare
  • Lynne
  • Rose
  • Elsie
  • Jennifer
  • Leigh Anne
  • Linda
  • Ramona

Slicers in my neighborhood that I see at local/Iowa events:

  • Kathy Scuitema
  • Deb Day

community

Slicers that I am looking forward to meeting:

Everyone of you that I have not yet met.  I so enjoy reading the “About” section of blogs to see where you are from and whatever additional information you provide.  I have gone with you to quilt shows, Africa, France, to family events, to dinner and have so enjoyed learning with and from so many talented writers!

My life is richer for all the slicers that I know around the world IRL (F2F) or online!  Thanks for being so generous with your time and stories! I’m honored to have so many great “blogging mentors” in my life!  Thanks to so many of you for stopping by, reading and commenting.

(And my sincere apologies, in advance, for anyone I’ve accidentally left off the list.  I started it two days ago and I’ve been checking my blog posts and my ILA, NCTE, and TCRWP notes to try to be as accurate as possible.  However, the mind is the first thing to go . . . with old age!)

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Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

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#DigiLitSunday: “Possible Sentences


Join Margaret Simon at “Reflections on the Teche” for additional #DigiLit Sunday reading here.

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Kylene Beers and Bob Probst are both speakers that I can listen to time and time again I’ve seen them at ILA, NCTE, and Kylene more than once at #TCRWP.  One strategy that I participated in that has stuck with me is “Possible Sentences”.  As a workshop participant, it went as Melanie Swider of “Two Reflective Teachers” described here although the session I attended was on a different date.

today

How can students more “authentically” USE vocabulary words and do more of the vocabulary “heavy lifting” in understanding and owning the words?

Possible Sentence Basic Process:

The teacher chooses vocabulary words.

The students, doing the work, predict and use the words in sentences.

*Then as a class, all the sentences are compiled and then questions are generated for each sentence.

Students read.

Students return to their sentences and questions to revise them based on the understanding of the topic after reading.

How could we start using “Possible Sentences” in Book Clubs or in Content Area classes and add in some meaningful, very purposeful, use of technology?

Here’s what I proposed for our first learning practice:

You can go to the actual documents through the links below and save your eyesight:

Google Drawing Student Task Card link

Google Drawing Teacher Card linklink

Tools:  NewsELA article, Wordcounter.com, Google Drawings cards, Google Docs – Response

Are you using “Possible Sentences”?

Have you added a technology component to increase student collaboration?

What tools did / would you use?

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