Tag Archives: Patterns of Power

2018: In the Rear View Mirror


What a year!

What does the data say?

Looking back is something of a habit as the New Year dawns.  Here were my reflective posts from 2017,  2016, 2015, 2014, and 2013.  It was fun to see where the emphasis has changed over time.

My Top 5 Most Viewed Blog Posts of all time are:

5. How do we know students are making progress in writing? (2014)

4.  Generative Writing as a Formative Assessment (2015)

3.  Lexile Level is NOT Text Complexity (2013)

                 2. Close Reading in Kindergarten? Is it possible? (2013)

1. #TCRWP and a Teacher’s Toolkit for Writing (2014)

Data analysis is interesting.  Four of the five posts were in my top 5 all time last year.  #2 this year is a new addition to the top 5. It leapfrogged to #2 by passing up three previous “all time” posts.

I continue to wonder if my OLD writing is more popular than my newer writing with two posts from 2013 in the top 5. “Or does the popularity mean that these posts are STILL topics/issues that present day literacy teachers are struggling with?”  Maybe these are topics that I need to review during the course of the year. They are definitely already on my March Slicer “To Write About” list.

My Top 8 Posts (by the number of readers) out of the 109 posts that were written in 2018 were:

8. #SOL18: Lit Essentials – Regie Routman’s Literacy Essentials with an entire section dealing with Equity!

7. #TCRWP: 3 Tips – Patterns of Power (Jeff Anderson), Mentor Texts with Simone Frazier and Heart Maps with Georgia Heard

6. #SOL18:  Reading Research  – Is all reading research equal?

5. Bloom’s and Thinking – Reconceptualizing Bloom’s Taxonomy

4. #SOL18: March 25 – Updated Reprise of #3 above “Lexile Level is NOT Text     Complexity (2013)

3. #NCTE18:  Digging Deeper #1 – Kass Minor, Colleen Cruz & Cornelius Minor

2. #SOL18:  March 15 – Barriers to Learning, Allington’s Six T’s, Student           Progress

1.#SOL18:  March 11 – Increasing Writing Volume

And this – Reading Research from the end of October and both a November post about NCTE and a December post can make it into the “Most Read in 2018” list within 4 – 8 weeks of the end of the year.  So Interesting!

What patterns do you see? 

Which topics did you find most compelling? 

What work do you review annually or over even longer time frames?




PROCESS:

Reflection

Analysis

Planning

Re-Reflecting

Wrapping up Curious with a Focus on being Joyful for this first chance to CELEBRATE!

 

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#TCRWP: 3 Tips


Screenshot 2018-06-21 at 6.13.42 AM

Day 3 Countdown . . .

Tip #3. 

Working with Jeff Anderson’s Patterns of Power this week in Marie Mounteer’s section has been a special treat in a section where our focus has been on Interactive Writing,

The steps for a lesson.

When to use.

Work with Conventions. Spelling. Capitalization.

Work with Grammar.

Beginning with the standards.

Using student writing to determine needs.

Formative assessment at its best.

Analyzing student writing to plan for one small group of three students with different needs.

Lifting the level of work for all.

It all began with this:

Screenshot 2018-06-21 at 6.25.37 AM

Everything you will need for planning is in Jeff Anderson’s book.  Sample sentences from fabulous literature that you will be reading to your students.  The only exception would be an actual sentence from the reading students are doing in your classroom.

Everything

is

in

Jeff 

Anderson’s

book.

Don’t consult other sources like TpT!

Use the research-based work from Jeff Anderson! (never a rip off) as you work and plan with a partner – Priceless!

Screenshot 2018-06-19 at 1.52.44 PM

Tip #2 

Simone Fraser and Toolkits

What do you include?

  • Mentor Texts 
  • Checklists from Writing Pathways
  • Progressions from Writing Pathways
  • Tools to do big work (micro-progressions! Also see Kate and Maggie and DIY Literacy – link)
  • Anchor Chart – Anchor Charts for the whole unit as well as charts from previous years

How do you organize?

So many possibilities. By units or within bends.

“I organize by the stages of the writing process.” 

Working collaboratively to create tools and share . . .

Tip #1

Do.not.ever.pass.on.an.opportunity.to.hear.Georgia.Heard.  What an inspiring keynote!!!

Her writerly life will inspire you as she details her process and shares the final product.

Her student examples will bring you to tears.

Gaspar’s Heart Map with a single wavy line down the middle to represent the line at the Mexican border.  He wrote a poem off of that map about his Mexican heart and American heart with alternating lines written in English and Spanish.  Awe-inspiring.

Heart maps are a powerful tool for writers and writing.  No one has ever said, ‘I have heart map block.’ Many students have said (prior to heart mapping), ‘I don’t know what to write about.’ Small moments can change us.  My writing teacher who wrote ‘add more details’ was really saying,  ‘pay attention and gather ideas for your writing.'”

Screenshot 2018-06-20 at 7.31.51 AM

What are you learning this week? 

How are you filling and fueling your brain? 

How are you filling and fueling your writing heart?

 

 

 

 

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