Tag Archives: reading habits

#SOL20: Reading Habits


I check my iPad mini and my Kindle app.  It’s only on the mini.  It’s a control issue.  Control my time issue.  So that means that it is not on my phone nor my computer. Seriously, it’s only on one device. Otherwise it would be toooooo tempting to read just another minute, five minutes or more!

Kindle has a Reading Streaks Activity Tracker.

I’ve read for 77 weeks in a row.

173 days in a row.

With a few touches, I discover that there were only 18 days that I did not read on my kindle during 2019. What makes me pause is the fact that the majority of my professional reading is done with real paper in hand books. Sometimes I have a book on my computer, but more often than not it’s the hard copy that I covet and therefore purchase. Implication: I may have read every day in 2019 but my data is inaccurate because:

  • It only includes Kindle reading
  • I did not have wireless access
  • I don’t know what counts as “reading”.  If I open the app, is that “good enough?”

Does it matter?

I am also trying to make sense of my Goodreads data and now I fully understand that I need to “calendar” time each month for recording.  Recording needs to be routinized if it is going to be accurate and therefore data that has utility.  Here’s what I know.

Screenshot 2020-01-06 at 12.11.05 PM

I have a collection of data points so I’m just sharing some others that either interested or intrigued me. This view is my books read by my ratings  and 6/77 have no rating so that’s an “oops” on my part. Typically, if the book is not a 4 or 5, I don’t enter it into Goodreads. I just keep reading.

Screenshot 2020-01-06 at 12.12.05 PM

This sort of books read by publication date is one of my favorites even though I am less concerned about the actual month of the year that the book is published as I have already read several 2020 books. What questions do you think are answered by this data?

Screenshot 2020-01-06 at 12.13.09 PM

And then a view of when I read, including a pop out list when I click on an individual bar.

And how does this graph differ from the one above?  What’s the same?

Screenshot 2020-01-06 at 12.15.07 PM

Automatic data collection is nice and deceptively addictive.  I could sort by my shelves and my content. As previously mentioned in 2017 here,  2018 here, June, 2019 here and winter break reading here, my reading goals this year were about balance and exploring a wider variety of genres. Is that data already available?  

Accuracy is an issue because this is what my totals looked like in June.  And I have read for 173 days straight since July. I also have only one Goodreads account now so that data is most suspect.

Screenshot 2020-01-06 at 2.27.38 PM.png

Before I record any books in Goodreads for 2020, I need to decide on the labels for “my shelves.” I like the idea of 5 categories for fiction and 5 for nonfiction. One big LUMP for Professional does not yield actionable data.

Decision Time

I need to start recording 2020 books. I want a manageable system that is easy and meets my needs. By the time I have reached that solution, I also believe that my #OLW will have resolved itself. 

Quantity?  Is it the numbers?

Quality?  Additional meaningful information?

Ease of collection?  Automatic, actionable, and accessible?

What stories do you find in your reading habits? 

What stories do your students find in their reading habits?




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this weekly forum. Check out the writers and readers here.

Screenshot 2019-01-29 at 3.12.16 AM.png

#SOL19: Celebrate!


1. Celebrate?

Wet!

Heavy!

White!

The dreaded first s#$%fall of the year.  Will it accumulate?  Will it last? What will the impact be?

2. Celebrate?

This notice from WordPress awaited me . . .

Screenshot 2019-10-28 at 10.07.16 PM

3. Celebrate?

Last week was a 2.25 hour (10 module training) for all the new processes . . .

in 98 days . . .

in our first in the nation process . . .

Iowa Caucus night . . .

2.25 hours of training

Training complete

4. Celebrate?

Notification . . .

Verified

Passed

100%

Quizes on each of the 10 modules in # 3 above.

5. Celebrate?

My reading goal for the year was 52 books . . . a book a week. I met that a while back. Still working on recording titles and updating the format of my “handwritten system” because I really wanted to emphasize broader categories of texts this year. Pushing on beyond:  professional, YA/children’s lit, mystery/suspense, nonfiction.  But that’s another post.

Celebrating a new source of data from Goodreads . . .

My Review Stats

Screenshot 2019-10-28 at 10.15.38 PM

Goodreads collects the year of publication so I can view the “age” of the books that I’ve reported on that site as read. 

What else is on my list/mind? 

  • My part in our NCTE presentation.
  • Choosing sessions to attend at NCTE.
  • Wrapping Christmas gifts.   

What’s on your list?  What will you be celebrating?




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this weekly forum. Check out the writers and readers here.

Screenshot 2019-01-29 at 3.12.16 AM.png



Random celebratory events that were all possibilities for a blog post.

Process: Beginning with one word (#OLW). Brainstorming. Collecting ideas. Sifting through thoughts. Vignettes of celebrations curated in one post. Reflecting on my #OLW:  Celebrate! (How do we demonstrate this for students?)  Opposite process of beginning with many words in this post.

Celebrate – published post!

 

 

#SOL15: Summer Reading – How important is it?


What are your summer reading plans?

Do you have a stack of books to be read?  A reading group that will meet? Regular trips to the library?

Why do you read in the summer?

I’m currently revisiting multiple books and chapters on “mentor texts”.  I’m not reading straight through.  I’m looking for specific details to flag and reread AGAIN at a later date.  Reading for fun is off the list as the school year winds down and I prep for summer classes.  My reading doesn’t stop.  But I find that my reading shifts and there is a surge in my “Reading to Locate Information” habit that overpowers my “Reading for Fun” habit.

What do your reading habits look like?  Do they change in the summer time?  Do you make time for leisurely reading?  How do we explain our “habits” to our students?  Does all reading have to be “serious reading”?

Why should students read at home?

I’m sure that many of you are familiar with this graphic.

why read

But what about this one that Donalyn Miller posted on Twitter this week?

summer reading loss

The title of the graph is “Low Income Students Fall 2.5 to 3 Years Behind by Grade 5”. The yellow line shows the cumulative growth of low income students vs. the blue line for middle class students.  

What should we do?

Richard Allington says that 80% of the summer reading loss is tied to income.  That’s an astonishing fact that does seem to be supported by the graph above.  His data from sending 10 books home for students in Florida emphasizes the importance of students reading ALL.YEAR.LONG! For more ideas about summer reading programs check out his book.

allington

Additional resources from Richard Allington can be found on his website here.

Why is it important for students to continue to read in the summer? (Not necessarily assigned book lists- but choice in reading!)

How can we encourage reading ALL.Year.Long?

How do students become habitual readers?

slice

Check out the writers, readers and teachers who are “slicing” here. Thanks to Stacey, Anna, Beth, Tara, Dana and Betsy at “Two Writing Teachers” for creating a place to share our work.  So grateful for this entire community of writers who also read, write and support each other!

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