Tag Archives: reflection

#SOL17: Retrospect


Screenshot 2017-12-26 at 5.30.26 AMWhat a year!

There are so many ways to vies the data in WordPress that my head can spin  . . . or I can just look like a bobblehead.  After all, what’s in a number?

Looking back is something of a habit before the New Year begins.  Here were my reflective posts from 2016, 2015, 2014, and 2013.  It was fun to see where the emphasis has changed over time.

My Top 5 Most Viewed Blog Posts of all time are:

5. How do we know students are making progress in writing? (2014)

4.  #DigiLit Sunday:  Critical Thinking (2017)

3.  Generative Writing as a Formative Assessment (2015)

 2.  Lexile Level is NOT Text Complexity (2013)

1. #TCRWP and a Teacher’s Toolkit for Writinf (2014)

Data analysis is interesting.  At first glance it appears that my OLD writing is more popular than my newer writing. Or does the popularity mean that these posts are STILL topics/issues that present day literacy teachers are struggling with?

My data is skewed and incomplete.  Every other year I have reported the top 10 posts.  Narrowing the parameters of my list causes the comparison to fluctuate from previous years.  And even more disconcerting is changing the years . . . what is the difference between “all time” lists and just the “top ten” from this year?  What is the difference between “from” and “for”?

My Top 5 Posts from 2017 are:

5. #DigiLitSunday: “Possible Sentences”

4. #SOLSC17: #OLW Brave

3. Reading Goals: What Do You Measure?

2. #DigiLitSunday: Summer Slide

1. #DigiLitSunday: Critical Thinking

Subtle differences require a discerning reader.

Today “I cherish the oddities”. (Call for slices by Melanie here.)

 

What kind of reader will you be in the future?

What data do you use for valid comparisons?

What data do you wonder about? 

Is all data equal?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      slice of life 2016

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#DigiLitSunday: Flexibility


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Check out additional posts with Margaret Simon, Reflections on the Teche.

In the field of fitness, “Flexibility is needed to perform everyday activities with relative ease.”(www.humankinetics.com)  By analogy flexibility when writing could  then be the ability to write with ease and even the ability to shift form or format with ease.

So what does “Flexibility” look like?

What does “flexibility” mean for ME?

I can reflect flexibly by using . . .

words

pictures

sketches

google images

a blog post

a tweet

a twitter chat

a voxer post

a doc

a poem

an infographic

a meme

my writer’s notebook

my sketchpad

my phone

my iPad mini

my laptop

What matters is that I take make the time to reflect! Self-improvement begins with reflection.  In order to improve both our present and our future, it is imperative that we begin with an understanding of the past.

Which of these pictures represents your current view of flexibility?

Why?

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#SOL15: March Challenge Day 31 – Before That


(Following the example of Sally Donnelly, a colleague and friend that I met face to face Saturday .  .  .  you can read her “Before That” here.)

Before That

I arrived home last night just before dark, without having encountered any deer, in my blue Hyundai rental without cruise control, eternally grateful that I was able to monitor my speed while excited about my weekend of learning.

Before that, I was thankful that I did not need the picture that I snapped of the fire extinguishers on the wall of the parking ramp near my car in order to remember where I left it after my mad dash to the airport on Friday following all day PD!

Before that, my US Airways jet landed in Des Moines in the midst of a balmy yet windy 75 degree afternooon. (I didn’t believe the pilot, I had to text a friend for verification. 75? Really?)

Before that, my US Airways jet finally departed the Washington DC airport after two hours of delay due to undisclosed maintenance.

Before that, we deplaned after 30 minutes of sitting on the tarmac.

Before that, we began boarding at the time listed on tickets for our departure.

Before that, we were shuttled to our departure terminal after the bus idled in our rectangular-painted location until the corresponding bus left Terminal 23 – our destination.

Before that, our shuttle flight landed in DC . . . exactly one hour late.

Before that, I was using the internet at LGA to stay caught up with email, slices, and organizing pictures captured over the weekend.

Before that, I was clearing check in and security literally in seconds due to TSA pre-check status and at my departure terminal in minutes.

Before that, I was on my way to the airport in a yellow cab, relishing the fact that 50% of the folks at Central Park were wearing shorts and the other 50% were bundled up from head to toe in winter coats.

Before that, I finished packing and added a few last minute thoughts to a document as I contemplated topics for my last March Challenge slice as well as beginning curious thoughts about what “traditional Tuesday” slicers would find for imaginative topics.  My current list of all the modes of transportation from the weekend in NYC (in reverse order):  taxi, walk, subway (loud guy), walk (“reading glasses”), subway, subway, walk, subway, walk, subway, bus, walk, walk, walk, walk, taxi, plane, walk, plane, walk, and rental car.

Before that, I had a hearty American breakfast at the Nice Matin, adjacent to the Lucerne Hotel, on the upper-west side of Manhattan because with a full day of travel, a solid breakfast to begin the day beats any and all airport food.

Before that, I read and responded to daily “slices” as well as posting my own and linking it at Two Writing Teachers.

Before that, I woke at 6:00 on my last morning in New York City (this trip to Teachers College Reading and Writing Project) in the fabulous Lucerne Hotel.

*  *  *  *  *

THANKS for reading my daily posts during March!

*   *   *   *   *

This is the last day of the March Daily Challenge. Check out the writers, readers and teachers who are “slicing” here. Thanks to Stacey, Anna, Beth, Tara, Dana and Betsy at “Two Writing Teachers” for creating a place for us to share our work.  So grateful for this entire community of writers who also read, write and support each other!

slice

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