Tag Archives: resources

#SOLSC20: Day 14


Maybe your school has spring break. Maybe you have an extended break.  Maybe you are planning for some online delivery of instruction/contact with your students.  Here is a collection of resources for you to peruse.

If lists make you crazy because you have to make decisions, think about your needs first.  What do you want?  What do you need?  What supports are you looking for that will enable your students to engage with some academics and yet have a life?

Maybe then you need some “Author” resources, Drawing with Jarrett, and 1 professional resource?

Kristin Ziemke and Katie Muhtaris – Read the World  – April, 2019 (Links)

Kristi Mraz:  Setting up independent work at home (Link)

Olivia Van Ledtje:  Are you helping kids learn from home?  Liv’s LIst Coronavirus (Link)

Kate Messner:  Read, Wonder and Learn Favorite Authors and Illustrators Share (Link)

Authors Everywhere: YouTube (Link)

Yo Yo Ma:  Songs of Comfort (Link)

Kids Ask Authors (Link)

READ ALOUDS: 

Pernille Ripp – Picture Books Read Alouds Blog Post (Link)

@TESPAtalk – 6:30 pm Monday – Friday Read Alouds Live on FB (Link)

Kids’ Corner – MGLit  (Link)

Draw Every Day with JJK (Jarrett J Krosoczka – YouTube (Link)

Museums Online:  Virtual Tours (Link)

Writing Resources:

Tammy  Mulligan – Daily Writing Camp with Hoppy and Ranger (Link)

Kate de Camillo – Writing  (Link)

Lynne Dorfman:  How to Help Young Writers- Suggestions for Parents  (Link)

SeeSaw:  Remote Learning for Teachers (Link)

Resources for Teaching OnLine (Link)

Jen Roberts:  Apps and Solutions Recommended for Distance Learning (Link)              *Parlay Ideas with an Online Round Table

Jennifer Serravallo  READING STRATEGIES FROM A DISTANCE: INDEPENDENT READING, MINILESSONS, READ ALOUD, AND CONFERRING. (Facebook Link)

Kylene Beers – Facebook Live Monday, March 16, from 3:00-3:30 ET, 2:00-2:30 CT (Link)Scott Bayer – Shifts in Your Practice – Blended Learning (50 min. video Link)

NCTE –  Resources: Virtual Instruction (Link)

CUNE – Distance Literacy Resources for Educators (Link)

Remote Learning with Flipgrid (Link)

Family Learning:  Flipgrid (Link)

NewsELA: Free for the remainder of the year (Link)

Scholastic:  Learn at Home (Link)

Common Sense (Link) –

  • Media recommendations for entertainment
  • Resources for at-home learning
  • Stress Management Resources

Nick Hoover Free Educational Resources – Spreadsheet (Link)

At home learning – Dr. Nathan Lang-Read

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Brave Writer: Free At home resources (Link)

Where will you begin?   

What are your most pressing needs?

Updated:

(See Day 15 here for thinking about how this could go at home for parents/caregivers  and more resources)

(See this post for ideas on where to start as a teacher facing online instruction, “Four Strategies for Effective Online Instruction.” Thank you,  Matt Renwick.  Link)




Thank you, Two Writing Teachers, for this daily forum in March. Check out the writers and readers here.

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Best of #ILA15: Did you see these resources?


International Literacy Association 2015 

Did you see all of these resources posted on Twitter this last week? Just one more reason that you all should be on Twitter for the professional resources and connections! (Check out the 30 blue live links!) In the interest of “organizing my files” from #ILA15, here are some resources that you might want to review!

ILA:  The Start of a Literacy Movement

Shiza Shahid – This is her TED talk, not her ILA speech, but well worth your time!

Professor Nana’s  “Summing it Up”

The Best of Twitter Quotes

ILA Literacy Daily:

Pam Allyn’s  “Reading is Like Breathing In; Writing is Like Breathing Out”

“Electric Opening Session Kickstarts ILA 2015 Conference”

“It Starts with You!” 

“Another Conference for the Books” 

“Literacy Conference Panel Weighs Teacher Prep”

Bruce Lansky’s  Poetry Olio Recap  “Saturday Night Live”

Education Week:  “Focus on the Standards without the Words ‘Common Core'”

Teachers for Teachers (Clare Landrigan and Tammy Mulligan):

Slice of Life:  Making Connections Through Laughter

“International Literacy Association 2015 – Be the Change You Want to See in the World!”

Pernille Ripp’s “The Five Truths of Reading”

Heinemann #ILA15 Live Blog

Saturday

Sunday

Miss Miller’s  “Because of ILA: Take Aways and Bring Backs” 

Carol Varsalona’s  “Positively Undone and Renewed”

Professor Nana’s  “What the ‘L’, Part 2”

Vicki Day’s  “Reflecting on #ILA15 – Number 1 Take Away”

and then in case you missed them, my posts about #ILA15:

  1. #ILA15: One Week and Counting
  2. #ILA15 Begins Tomorrow!!!
  3. #ILA15 Begins . . . Reading with Rigor
  4. #ILA15: Pre-Conference Day Learning
  5. #ILA15: Day 1 Treasure Trove
  6. #ILA15: Treasures Continued
  7. #ILA15: Sunday Treasures
  8. #ILA15: Monday Finale
  9. #ILA15 Reprise

Have you added any new blogs to follow?

Will you plan to attend #ILA16 in Boston next July?

Common Core ELA Resources*


A LinkedIn question from ASCD that landed in my mailbox at 4:02 a.m. today asked members to “Share the name of ONE state or district that appears to offer the best Common Core resources.”  The parameters of this task – limiting myself to ONE – seemed quite daunting. It was way too early to respond on such a nice sunny, summer day!  So about four hours later, let me offer my best answers for today and you can see if you agree!

1. Building background knowledge:

2. Specific passages for use with students:

3. Building leadership capacity – teachers/administrators:

4. Planning for instruction: 

5. Student writing examples that demonstrate the demands of the core:

Did you notice that many of my favorite resources fit more than one category above?  I wonder if that is why they have become a favorite?  

Which of these resources are you familiar with?

Which ones would you have on your list(s)?

Please comment below if you would like to know “why” a particular site is included here!

There are many great resources available including many blogs by teachers and professional development providers that I follow in a text box on the right column.  The links above are the resources I continue to return to when I want to check my own understanding!

Buyer Beware: Common Core Resources


“CCR.ELA Anchor Standard for Reading Informational Text #9 (K-12)
Analyze how two or more texts address themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.”

“CCR.ELA Anchor Standard for Writing #8 (K-12)
Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.”

___________________________________________________________________

When you are looking for resources, how do you determine which resources are relevant, accurate, and appropriate? (And by extension, how do you “teach” those skills to your students?)

Just because the label says “Common Core,” it doesn’t mean that it really is the Common Core.  How do you know?  Check for the icon that represents Common Core.  Check  reputable sources. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!  Be careful out there!

In the beginning, consider these primary sources:

Possible Secondary Sources from ASCD:

10 Additional Resources to Consider

To find out more about what Common Core will mean for your teachers and students, follow these links.  (How will you decide which ones meet your needs?)

  1. Common Core Standards AppThis iPhone application (it is also available for Android) lets teachers keep essential information about Common Core at their fingertips.
  2. The Teaching Channel – 100 videos about the Common Core Many are excellent and range from broad topics to specific lesson plans based on standards.
  3. P21 Toolkit for the Common Core  – A Guide for Aligning the CCSS with the Framework for 21st Century Skills is available here.
  4. achieve.org – Additional resources for implementation of the Common Core.
  5. CCSSI WikiOne simple way to learn more about the CCSSI is to visit the program’s Wikipedia page, which is packed with useful information on the subject.
  6. Common Core WorkbookUse this workbook from Achieve and the U.S. Education Delivery Institute to help guide the Common Core implementation process at your school.
  7. Bi-Weekly Newsletter from the Chief Council of Officers Useful information about all things Common Core and includes a free tool to evaluate CCSS text (registration required).
  8. Common Core State Standards for School Leaders  A Scoop.it! site that is filled with resources compiled from around the web.
  9. CommonCore.org:  Here you’ll find an organization dedicated to ensuring that the Common Core is about more than just reading and math, instead promoting a well-rounded education that includes reading literature, studying culture, and engaging with the arts. 

The promise of increased student learning through the implementation of the Common Core Standards will depend upon the decisions that you make about the resources that you consult on a regular basis.  

Is the most reliable and valid information available from a Google search?  

What other resources do you use for your information about the Common Core?  

Please comment below if you have additional resources that you believe I should add!

Writing and the Common Core / Iowa Core


In preparation for providing professional development on the English Language Arts (ELA) Standards, I specifically studied the Writing Standards.  The more I read, the more I wondered about my own writing skills.

What’s the big deal?  Are your students currently able to write at a level consistent with the language of the Common Core as outlined in the following excerpt?

“Note on range and content of student writing

 For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt. To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures, and formats deliberately. They need to know how to combine elements of different kinds of writing—for example, to use narrative strategies within argument and explanation within narrative—to produce complex and nuanced writing. They need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining, and collaborating on writing and visual media. They have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and cogent manner. They must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality first draft text under a tight deadline as well as the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it.” (page 41 Common Core/page 54 Iowa Core)

Resources Available to Enhance Your Understanding of Writing:

  • ELA Core Anchor and Grade Level Standards (Iowa Core in my case)
  • Common Core Standards Appendix A
  • Common Core Standards Appendix C – Writing Samples
  • The seven book series:    Getting to the Core of  Writing: Essential Lessons for Every   (Kindergarten through Sixth Grade) Student.  Authors:  Richard Gentry, Jan McNeel and Vickie Wallace -Nesler.  The resources are aligned with the Common Core State Standards and are embedded with six traits quality writing.
  • Energize Research Reading and Writing:  Fresh Strategies to Spark Interest, Develop Independence, and Meet Key Common Core Standards, Grades 4-8 by Christopher Lehman. The book is designed to help students become critical thinkers.
  • The three book series:  So, What’s the Story?: Teaching Narrative to Understand Ourselves, Others, and the World (Exceeding the Common Core State Standards) by James Fredricksen, Jeffrey D Wilhelm and Michael Smith, Get it Done!: Writing and Analyzing Informational Texts to Make Things Happen (Exceeding the Common Core State Standards) by Jeffrey D Wilhelm, Michael Smith and James Fredricksen,  and Oh, Yeah?!: Putting Argument to Work Both in School and Out (Exceeding the Common Core State Standards) by Michael Smith, Jeffrey D Wilhelm and James Fredricksen
  • Teaching Argument Writing, Grades 6-12: Supporting Claims with Relevant Evidence and Clear Reasoning  by George Hillocks, Jr.
  • Numerous other texts on my shelves including authors Jim Burke, Kelly Gallagher, and Lucy Calkins

Deconstucted standards available include:

See North Carolina’s deconstructed ELA standards with narratives and prompts HERE.

See Kentucky’s deconstructed standards  HERE for ELA.

Added 12/2/2012 @ 3:21 pm CST http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/classroom_qa_with_larry_ferlazzo/2012/12/response_a_napkin_curriculum_for_writing.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

My most important takeaway ~ All of these authors are talking about writing beyond task completion in school!!!

What resources are YOU using to improve teaching AND learning in writing?

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