Tag Archives: technology

Book Love Foundation Summer Book Club


Penny Kittle announced on Twitter:

“Registration is open! Join the Book Love Foundation Summer Book Club to read with colleagues and learn from authors during our exclusive online LIVE events.This year we have both elementary and secondary book clubs. Check out summerbookclub.org @HeinemannPub @ncte @ncte_cel”

BLF summer.png

Secondary (Teachers of Grades 6-12+) June & July

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Elementary – JULY (+ guests Donalyn Miller & Debbie Miller)

So you will go to summerbookclub.org

Watch the video with Penny Kittle.

Watch the video with Clare Landrigan.

You will have three choices:

MS/HS book club (June-July) (Books, swag and online content)

Elementary book club (July) (Books, swag and online content)

Online resources only (open as soon as you register for discussion and specific “units” for each week of discussion)  BONUS – all online options see all discussions and content – the whole shebang.

See you at summerbookclub.org

What are you waiting for?

Conversations with teachers,

Conversations with authors,

And more libraries for teachers . . .

 

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#NCTE18: Digging Deeper #2


A second look at a Saturday session because I’m still trying to define “Responsive Teaching” and I saw it masterfully executed in this session. And I am still in awe. And so thankful that these readers, writers, and educators are in my life.

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Responsive Teaching:  The Courage to Follow the Children

Presenters:  Kim Yaris, Jan Miller Burkins, Dani Burtsfield,  Christina Nosek, and Kari Yates

Jan began with having us close our eyes to “Think about a teacher who loved you into being” and then having us share that story with a partner.  It’s often easy to remember those who did NOT love you into being but responsiveness begins with the heart . . .  Don’t rush to “check it off.” Skill and expertise has to come behind.

 

What’s the focus if you view student work through the lens of “Love”? 

What’s the focus if you view student work through the lens of “Expertise”? 

This was the student work we viewed.

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Not just judging and reacting, but thinking in terms of what the student “can do”! 

  • Phonological awareness
  • Most of the alphabet and how to write it
  • Knows how words work
  • Knows onset
  • Knows rime
  • Knows rhyme 
  • Understands what is socially appropriate communication!

Kim also read “Daisy” from Who’s Doing the Work and we considered what we knew about Daisy as a person and as a reader. It was extremely helpful to have a partner to add more ideas. (My immediate thought that went into my notes:  And what if PLCs operated more with this type of data?)

Being responsive is about seeing students, understanding and responding based on the love and expertise of the teacher.

Students doing the work.  Teachers stepping back and admiring student work first before responding.

To Know and Nurture a Reader

Conferring is a path to responsive teaching, raising and following the voice of one student at a time.

Using Four Quadrants – so visually appealing and helpful . . .

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There are many questions that fit into each of those boxes and those are available in Christina’s and Kari’s book.

If a conference begins with:

What’s going on?                           

What is my response?  It may vary . . . 

“I wonder, I jot a note or

I wonder, I affirm, I jot a note or

I wonder, I affirm, I remind, I jot a note or

I wonder, affirm, extend, remind, take note”

And then those basic responses in a visual format. . .

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What if they are coded by thought bubbles for “wonderings” or talk bubbles for “affirmations” and boxes for the notes/glueing reminders?

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This format could be my conferencing format.

I might have 4 of these boxes on a page.

Depending on our conference content, a box might hold different colored ink entrees or dates as I record the content from the conference in this format.

Thinking about the application of THIS work.  How does it make sense?

And what a treat. Dani had examples of work in all four quadrants for a kindergarten student.  Here’s an example of one kindergarten student’s “Healthy Habits” . . .

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As I listened to Dani’s examples from a kindergarten level, I thought of Christina’s fifth graders.  I wondered if they could complete a reflection about themselves as a reader.  Christina said, “Just wait” and then she shared a fifth grade student page from which I am only sharing the book choice portion.

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BUT

Have teachers done this work?

Where do teachers stand in these four quadrants? 

How aware are they? 

How would this move teacher confidence and competence in coaching readers forward?

Screenshot 2018-11-21 at 11.50.15 AM

My Take Aways: 

  1. Responsive teaching  – you will know it when you see it.  It’s hard to describe but pure magic when you see it in action. Today:  Being responsive is about seeing students, understanding and responding based on the love and expertise of the teacher. Conferring is a path to responsive teaching, raising and following the voice of one student at a time.
  2. “Step back so your students can step forward.” Jan and Kim
  3. “Don’t wait for perfection. Start now.” Christina and Kari



Twitter:  @burkinsandyaris       Facebook     Site:  https://www.burkinsandyaris.com/

Jan Burkins: @janmillburk     Kim Yaris: @kimyaris

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Twitter  @ChristinaNosek  @kari_yates

Facebook group 

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#NCTE17: Saturday


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And the answers were:

Bob Probst:  “I would give students more access to models of student discourse so they can talk about the content.” 

Lucy Calkins:  “I would give teachers more time for professional conversations, to dive into problems of practice together as a community and share their discoveries.”

Kylene Beers:  “I would double your pay and cut the number of students in your class in half.”

This last question posed by moderator Lester Laminack who was seated on stage with the panel was:  “If you had a magic wand in public education today, what would you do with it?”

Was this the most memorable question of the day?  Why begin here?  Because Saturday was a ginormous day of learning at #NCTE17.  My day was filled with nonstop sessions and meetings from 7:30 am until 10:05 pm.  It was Saturday.  I was in St. Louis.  And let me repeat, “my day was filled with nonstop sessions and meetings from 7:30 am until 10:05 pm.” And it was Saturday.  If you do the math, the answer is something like 14+ hours.

Details:  The first meeting was a breakfast. The last gathering was dinner. 15 minutes in between sessions to race from one end of the convention center and settle in for 75 minute learning opportunities… On a Saturday!

NCTE

What is personalized learning?

What is the role of technology?

My answer is #NCTE17.  A conference that I choose to attend, at my own expense, in order to learn and grow professionally.  A conference where I renew my professional “joie de vivre“.  I chose my schedule (or does it chose me?).  I make a plan or two. I continually check my list of “Must Learns“. Some items are topics.  Some items are names.  Names of people. Names of books.  And the best intersection . . . authors of books from book chats or book studies. The books in my bag in my hotel room that I forgot to match up to my schedule to bring for autographs.  Those authors.  Those from whom I want to learn MORE!

Personalized = my choice.  Technology = those I have met on Twitter, Voxer, and blogs (that I now meet face to face).  A lasting marriage of Voice and Choice on Saturday for 14+ hours of learning! Learning on my own dime and time.

So what did I learn?

“We still need a balance of technology and print in our literacy lives.  There is not yet a definitive answer on when and how much screen time is appropriate for effective learning.  Think balance.”  Colleen Cruz, TCRWP

Lucy Calkins:  “Transference of phonics is the goal. We don’t need a professor of phonics.”

“Our new work is our best work.  We are always striving to improve and outgrow ourselves as a community of learners.”

To learn more about Jacqueline Woodson, Saturday General Session, check out her website. Simply gorgeous keynote!

F.38 What Matters Most About Reading and Writing 

(Lester Laminack, Kylene Beers, Robert Probst, and Lucy Calkins)

What I will hold onto:

Kylene shared that 80% of adults go to text in order to be right.  So we need to teach HS kids that reading, entering a text, is an opportunity to change yourself.

Lucy Calkins – “Live as if one of the pillars of your thinking is dead wrong.” Go to sessions, work with folks because if we only read our books and stay in our bubble – we will not be surprised and will not outgrow ourselves.

Lester Laminack:  Our children are 21st century citizens . . . ask Siri ‘Why do bees buzz?” (and he did on stage for all of us to listen to) How do we convince Ss to fall in love w/ books?  That’s a question for your, dear reader!

Lucy:  We can grow as writers if we write along side our students when they are writing.  We don’t have to be writers before we begin teaching writing.

Kylene:  Writing to tell or Writing to discover. We can’t and don’t write enough. We shouldn’t teach kids non-fiction means not fake which then turns to true…let’s teach them non-fiction means not fiction. Non-fiction can be fake, not because you don’t agree with it though.

G.04  How to Say Less So Readers Can Do More:  Developing Agentive Readers

(Jan Burkins, JoAnne Duncan, Gravity Goldberg, and Renee Houser)

We read passages at 90% accuracy.  They were tough to understand.  Sometimes reading is tough.  We need to acknowledge that.  But we also need to make sure that students DO THE WORK!  We need to set up those conditions of learning!

who is

Haven’t read it?  No excuse!

You can read about it here, here, and here.

what

Gravity and Renee have this fiction and a nonfiction parallel book as well.  Have you read them? Reflections on the books are included on a post here.

JoAnne shared the journey of a particular student in her building who learned to read and was then given books when she moved from the school. Powerful and tear jerking reminders that our relationships matter.  We have to be a part of our students’ lives.

H.08 Harnessing the Power of Multicultural  Literature and Critical Literacy to Generate Authentic and Enjoyable Writing Spaces That Bring Writers Back into the Workshop

(Brian Kissel, Kristina Kyle, and Lauren Rudd)

The two first grade international teachers  shared the influences of their work:

Critical Literacy

  • James Paul Gee
  • Paulo Freire
  • Vivian Maria Vasquez

Social action  (for a Better World)

  • Randy Bomer
  • Katherine Bomer
  • Stephanie Jones

brian

And then Brian had us read and think alongside his reflections on his student work! For more information about Brian and his work, check out this post.

Thought to Ponder:

What would happen if you read every piece of student work just like you read every published book?

I.20 Recapturing Assessment:  Student Voices in Aiding Our Mission

(Jason Augustowski, Dr. Mary Howard, Dr. Katie Dredger, Cindy Minnich, Sam Fremin, Ryan Hur, Joseph O’Such, Christian Sporre, Dawson Unger, Spencer Hill, Jack Michael, Ryan Beaver, Sean Pettit, and Kellen Pluntke)

Take aways from the #BowTieBoys:

  • Students do not want multiple choice tests.
  • Students do not want to regurgitate facts.
  • Students do not want to write essays every time to show evidence of their learning.
  • Students do not want to sit in rows of desks.
  • Students do not want to listen to lectures.
  • Students do not want a two page writing limit.

Students want choice.

Students want voice.

Students want opportunities to negotiate HOW to share their learning.

Students want to explore their own interest.

Students want to use technology.

Students want to learn even if that takes more work. 

Students are less concerned about “fairness in grading” then they are about having choices in open-ended rubrics.

(edited)  For additional details about the individual presentations from this round table see Mary C Howard’s Facebook post here.

J. 21. Beyond Levels:  Choosing Texts to Scaffold Instruction for Engagement and Agency

(Clare Landrigan, Tammy Mulligan, Terry Thompson, and Dorothy Barnhouse)

It was such a pleasure to see the cover of Clare and Tammy’s new book and then to have Dorothy read Yo, Yes to us. We can find authentic ways to build in engagement and agency without “cute” worksheet pages!  Tammy and Clare’s blog is here.

And of course, ending with the Slicer Dinner!  16 bloggers (weekly and each day in March) meet up for food, fun, continued learning, and conversation. (Again . . . Personalized Learning and Technology) Thank you, Two Writing Teachers!

slicers

What is your personalized learning plan? 

Does technology play a part? 

Are you ready to sign up for #NCTE18 in Houston?

#SOL17: How Many Devices?


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Phone? Check

iPad? Check

Chromebook?  Check

Extension Cord?  Check

Charging cords for all three above?  Check

Do I REALLY NEED my laptop?

“It’s a quick overnight for a day’s training plus some family time at a concert?  REALLY?  Can’t I just leave it at home?”

It was a gorgeous learning day.  Devices cooperated for the perfect environment where I could take notes and also have access to text messages, Twitter, and Facebook,

SLICER TIME!

“And that’s why I need my laptop!  I’ve never been able to successfully add a WordPress blog on my chrome book. I’ve messed with a wide range of possibilities, asked on some helplines, and invariably just either drafted on my phone or pulled out the trusty old laptop and started a post.”

It doesn’t matter that I was thinking of ideas before I fell asleep.

The incredible PD with Dr. Mary Howard.

Friendship

Family

Fall

Looming “First Frost”

The impending excitement of #NCTE17

The power of Twitter

The unbelievable magic of Twitter chats

Screenshot 2017-10-24 at 8.00.15 AM

Chromebook?  Tried but nope, no luck with WordPress!

Phone?  Not the finished look I would like!

Is a draft better than NOTHING?

YES!

So today’s slice is brought to you via a draft on my phone and a bit of polish on my iPad.  My plan for my next travel is to save a formatted draft so that I can add text and publish with relative ease from any device.  (Cross my fingers that I remember!)

How do you turn around a failure? What do you learn from it?

What do you do when your device(s) don’t cooperate?

When do you sacrifice BEST WORK for BEST EFFORT?  




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      slice of life 2016

August #TCRWP Reading: Day 1


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Monday arrives with rain and yet the fire in my brain flames on . . .

Lucy Calkins keynote . . .

Laughter with Natalie Louis . . .

Learning with Kelly Boland Hohne

Illumination with Cornelius Minor

Such was the Monday in my life!

Today’s post is a recap of information from Cornelius Minor from his closing session: “Using Digital Tools to Offer Access to Students with IEPs”

Access for all Kids – Why is Access Important?  (AKA “Research to Weaponize”) 

  •        UdL – more inclusive
  •        On heels of Civil Rights
  •        Architects – ADA compliant – door width, door knob  (designed from inception)
  •        Knowledge of the three networks that access the brain:
    • Recognition (input – see, hear, perceive);
    • Strategic (executive functioning); and
    • Attitude (and feelings about teacher and learning)

 

Here is a chart I developed to organize some of the information shared by Cornelius.

                                                             What is the main thing?  
Skills Instruction
Vocabulary

Alfred Tatum – Teaching Reading to Adolescent Black Boys  (Chicago) (EL)
Start with verbs – most common  (not ameliorate)  to speak, to move, to think

Build on strengths!

Synonyms:  Ponder, saunter, exclaim – derivatives of most common words.

Camera  saunter A , B photographer

Video ponder B, A videographer

Develop criteria together.

Make pic for word wall – Use students in the class

Social – Doing and Talking

Fluency

The sound of my voice when I am reading text I care about.  (have to like my audience as well as my text)

Teen ink  is a source

“The day I met you was a bad hair day”

Need texts that are worthy of practice.

“Going to play Simon says. You are going to read the poem like I do!”

3 different emotions:

  1. “You just ate the last Dorito” and I wanted it
  2. “Cutest baby” – change voice to match your meaning
  3. Accused, but didn’t throw paper ball!

   Annotate text for emotion

Specific Chrome Tools

  • Announcify
  • Read and Write for google
  • Ginger – grammar checker
  • Google dictionary – define and save
  • Text compactor – summary
Have 3 or 4 that are extremely effective.

More is NOT better.

Can also change readability

Effort

Behavior mirror

Transfer – Use contexts that are familiar – Audio / Video – Students use daily!

Do what the leader does!  SELL it!

Effort lives in our methodology.

What was something tried and true?  

What was new?  

What will you do next?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      slice of life 2016

#SOL17: Service?


“I can understand complete sentences.  Please speak in complete sentences.”

Please connect me with a service representative.

“I can help you with that.

I need your first name and last name.

I’m sorry, I didn’t understand that.

Would you please repeat your first name and last name?”

First name. Last name.

Slower and Louder the second time.

“What is your billing address?

Please include your full address:

Street,

Apartment number,

Town,

State,

Zipcode.

Please clearly state your full address now.”

Full Address

“Please tell me the first name and last name of the person on the account.”

First name. Last name.

“And who am I speaking to today?

Please tell me your first name and your last name.”

First name. Last name.  A.G.A.I.N.  Seriously?

“What is the phone number associated with your account?

Please state the entire 10 digit number.”

Phone number.

“What is your account number?

This is the 10 digit number associated with your account.

There are no letters.

They are all numbers.

Please tell me if you need time to get your account number.”

Account number.

“How can I help you today?”

I have no phone or internet service.  Please connect me with a service representative.

“I can help you with that.”

Today is DAY NINE.  One service tech visit later and two hours of working internet.

One brief interlude.

Now gone.

Anatomy of phone calls . . .

The shortest time from a call to a “real person” is five minutes and two seconds.

And guess what that conversation is once I am connected to a “live” person:

“Could I have your first and last name?

Could I have your 10 digit phone number?

Can I have your address?

. . .

What is acceptable in terms of service response time?  

A lack of internet is a HUGE problem for me.

(Teaching an online class, work tasks, twitter, messages & pix from all) 

To Windstream?

Apparently not!

On the upside, I have read more in the last week.

On the downside, my patience with any technology issues is now -10 and dropping rapidly!

Advice?  Suggestions?  Similar situations?



Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.

#DigiLitSunday: Purpose


digilit-buttonCheck out other #DigiLit Sunday posts at Margaret Simon’s Reflections on the Teche here. 

purpose.jpg

Purpose:  The End or the Beginning?

In the process of getting ready for #NCTE16, I was considering not blogging about this topic today.  And yet, here I am because of three different conversations this week.  I vacillated between:

What’s the “purpose” for assessment?

What’s the “purpose” for instruction?

What’s the “purpose” for digital tools?

  1. What does the research say?

Doug Fisher and John Hattie both shared this effect size for “Teacher Clarity” in Iowa in separate October, 2016 professional development sessions.  That’s well about the “.40” that is touted as a “cut score” and is almost the equivalent of TWO YEARS of learning for students. Therefore, Teacher Clarity is important in instruction, and equally important in assessment  aligned with instruction and perhaps has the greatest importance in the selection of digital tools for students.

Hattie Teacher Clarity .75.jpg

2.  What do teachers need to consider in the planning process?

Teachers spend hours poring over lesson plans and planning for instruction that will meet ALL students’ needs. Searching for the right resources, planning that delivery that will empower students and most of all trying to make learning purposeful and engaging.  That’s not easy as some content is hard for students to really “grapple with” for real understanding ans not just rote memorization.  However, if the goal is “LEARNING” and is focused on Teacher Clarity, won’t that require the teacher to BEGIN with “What will the students know and be able to Do after they complete this learning?  So the teacher process might include some or all of these steps depending on the curriculum that exists and the expectations of any given curriculum.

planning-one

Retrieved from  ict/lesson plan

Each step in the process above has ideas for “possible tools” to use during the planning and / or learning process.

3. But what about the learning environment?

Which classroom promote accelerated learning for students?  How and where are students preparing for today, tomorrow and life “after school”?

What should classrooms look like?

 

4. What tools should the teacher and the students use? 

The learning purpose should determine the possible range of tools that both the teacher and the students will use.  Will the students ALWAYS have a voice in selecting the tools?  Probably not, YET. Should the students have a bigger voice in selecting the tools that will showcase their learning?  YES!  Students should be allowed encouraged to showcase their learning in a variety of ways.  Learning should not always look like “cookie cutter” factory models.

As I’ve thought about purpose and its role in learning, this is the way that I have viewed it . . . with “purpose” as a critical factor at each level.

purpose-for-learning

But now I wonder if “PURPOSE” should be the circle that houses the other four circles.  Maybe purpose really is all encompassing and is the “driver” behind all decisions. So are the learning targets the center and purpose the frame for all learning?

Where do you believe “Purpose” lives in the daily decision-making processes involved in instruction?

 

#TCRWP: Techno-Life


And the instructions said:

“Ethernet cable needed.”

Yet no ethernet cable was needed in 2013, 2014, or 2015.

And the MacBookAir I am currently typing on, has no ethernet port.

No port, no ethernet cable needed. No research, just simple common sense.

My Friday afternoon arrival and check in at New Residence Hall went smoothly. My check in for the online class that I am teaching . . . NOT.SO.MUCH.

computer one

No wifi in my dorm room.

Unacceptable.

It’s 2016.

It worked in 2013.

It worked in 2014.

It worked in 2015.

Unacceptable.

Residential Housing said,

“Ethernet cable needed.

Get a USB adapter.

Check back on Monday when someone is in the office.”

Current residents said,

“Ethernet cable needed.”

In the interest of truth and fairness, wifi is available

In the lounge on first floor.

So Friday night, I

Pack the computer.

Pack the phone.

Pack pencil and paper.

Pack a snack.

Trudge to the lounge.

Use wifi.

But wifi in the lounge on the first floor is not the same as wifi in your own room.

In your home for the next two weeks.

So Saturday morning, I

Pack the computer.

Pack the phone.

Pack pencil and paper.

Trudge to the lounge.

Use wifi.

I check out the #TC website and locate CIS help available from 10 – 10 even on a Saturday.

I wait in the lounge.

I greet old friends.

I call CIS and have a pleasant chat and a

“Ethernet cable?  That’s not acceptable.”

But technical on-site assistance is not available.

I research the nearest Best Buy.

On the metro to Columbus Circle, I wonder how “good” the FREE wifi is on the Metro and how the Metro system understands that connectivity is important!

Decisions, decisions, decisions . . . Cat 5, Cat 6, how many feet of cable?

Face to face assistance is needed.

(And of course, I brought my computer along. No guessing needed!)

Some wondering around. A bit of sight seeing.

Back to New Residence Hall.

24 hours later, now armed with Ethernet cable and USB adapter,

and several tens of dollars fewer,

I plug it all in.

No internet.

I restart my computer.

No internet.

I call CIS and it so happens that the tech person is in and will come over.

By the time I get down to the security desk to tell them the CIS person is on their way, he’s actually entering the building.

A person who loves challenges,

He reboots

Checks internet connectivity

Restarts

umm, hmm, yes, update needed!

Yet, no internet even WITH ethernet cable and USB connector.

A valiant effort, but no success.

Bummed!

I feel like this!

broken computer.jpeg

But recognize that it’s not a viable option!

So I

Pack the computer.

Pack the phone.

Pack pencil and paper.

Trudge to the lounge.

Use wifi.

I google my issues and problems.

I find the directions for the USB connector.

AND I download the driver.

When I return to my room I plug in the ethernet cable and the USB connector,

AND

I

HAVE

INTERNET

IN
MY
ROOM!

happy dance

When all else fails, read the instructions!

It’s Sunday morning, my internet is still working

And I’m ready for #TCRWP’s Writing Institute tomorrow.

What challenge(s) are you ready to overcome?

Where will your persistence lead you?

Learning Curve


Think about something new that you have learned lately.  Something that required more than five or ten minutes to learn. Something that you had to practice and work at a little bit . . . or maybe a lot.

Do you have a learning situation in mind?

Now consider these questions:

  • Did you choose the topic?
  • Were you curious about the topic?
  • Did you go joyfully into a study of the topic?
  • Was it something that you “just had to learn”?

Which of these describes your learning curve for the situation you have in mind?

I’m ready for a two week learning adventure that “kicks off” my summer learning.  But with a little reflection, I came to the realization that it definitely kicks off my “out of town/state learning” but not my summer learning.

On Monday of the last two weeks, I worked with Lisa, one of our Technology Specialists, on a “class” that we were offering for local teachers.  We had talked, planned, and talked over the course of several months.  After the first of May we got serious and talked about what our product would look like. The expression on my face had to be priceless . . . reading apps/tech tools, writing apps/tech tools, and Google drawing.  My knowledge level:  kinda, kinda, and not a clue.

The class:  Exploring and Reviewing Technology for K-5 Reading Instruction

Our goal:  Find meaningful quality resources to support quality core instruction in K-5 reading classrooms.  We originally thought of reading, writing about reading, and fluency as key areas where data would support that technology might be able to support growth in learning.

How would we do that? Well, we began talking about the criteria for “technology to support reading”.  Yes, student engagement is important. Yes, learning is important.  Yes, the 4 C’s are important (Communication, Collaboration, Critical Thinking and Creativity).

How do teachers currently make decisions about WHAT tools to use?  Is there a better way to make decisions about TOOLS?  We weren’t able to answer all of our questions, but we did learn a lot as we explored and reviewed technology.  We modeled a bit of “app-smashing”.  In a technological world that changes just about as fast as the temperature or the price of gas, one of our goals was just to increase OUR own knowledge of what tools teachers are using, how they learn about them, and how they know students are learning!

So here’s an example of some of my learning in May to get ready for this class.

Screenshot 2016-06-16 18.12.53

 

New Learning:  Google drawing, Canva and a format for sharing.  I lucked out on the format and was able to begin with “make a copy” of a similar task card already created by our talented media specialist Tricia.  (Here’s a link to view the document in real size.)  The goal of this task card is that students could have some choices and follow the directions to try out the challenge.

Screenshot 2016-06-16 18.14.00

Teachers would have this version of the card in order to make a decision about whether this would work, or even more importantly, even be appropriate for their students. In some classrooms there are many devices with all students having google accounts.  And the lower tech classroom may have fewer devices and no student google accounts. (Google link here.)

New Learning:  Continued work with Google Drawing, Canva and considering teacher tips.

Still considering:  What’s the best way to “show” an appropriate amount of information without overwhelming teachers or students?   How do these drawings work for you the reader/writer?

When I was working on these Google drawings, my learning curve felt like it was almost a straight vertical line – no curve at all, especially when my content for the cards was also new.  Because I was familiar with many digital sources of print, that content was the easiest.  However two boxes and different colored backgrounds caused more learning about Google Drawings.

It’s summertime and the school year (work year) has ended.  But this learning was in the last month and applied in the last days of the year.  Teaching, working, and learning up until the last minute . . . and even to infinity and beyond.

Am I always learning?  How do you know?

Are you always learning?  How do we know?

What’s your plan for continued learning?

 

 

 

#DigiLit Sunday: Perspective


It’s time to write about this week’s topic “Perspective”.

As I think of drafting, revising, editing, and publishing this post, I also think about the technology that enables me to write more efficiently and effectively than ever before.

Will technology be my friend?  

Will my computer cooperate?

laptop

How will I know?  As an early morning “writer”, I am quite OCD about early publication so I can move on to the “heart of the day”.

Will my screen look like this?

operator

Will I throw up my hands in the air and quit?

Who will win?

The person?

Or the machine?

Will I work collaboratively for a “Win-Win” situation to accomplish the task without drama or frustration?

It’s ALL about perspective!

It’s your choice!

What’s your MINDSET?

Thanks for the topic, Margaret!  Check out more #DigiLit Sunday posts at Margaret Simon’s blog,  Reflections on the Teche.

digilit

 

 

 

 

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