#SOL17: Silver Lake


Where do YOU begin?

Here’s a simple list of words from my writing notebook

Begun with an early morning observation

Sipping coffee

Waking up

At Silver Lake

Some words from the present.

Some from the past.

Some added over time.

words

How does a list evolve?

Grow?

Morph?

What categories would you make?

While waiting for inspiration to strike,

I’ve learned to keep my fingers moving across the keyboard.

Looking for photos

Looking for organization

and word clouds suddenly appeared in my brain.

word cloud oneword cloud twoword cloud threeword cloud fourword cloud five

Changing colors

Changing shapes

Changing colors

Adding a filter.

Using a visual as a stimulus . . .

Ready to write!

One of Those Moments

One of those moments

Etched on my cornea

Burnt into my brain

Captured in my heart

Gray sky

Combinations of clouds

White, thin, wispy

Surrounded by large and fluffy white-topped clouds

With an under girding of gray

Ready for a sprinkle or

Perhaps a shower or

Sheets of rain or

Buckets full pouring from the heavens

Harmony in thoughts shared

Rich in laughter

Engrossed in fun

So much to do!

A boat ride,

Pictionary,

Writing talk,

3 Truths and a Lie, and

Learning to play a ukelele.

Friends

Voxer Cousins

Readers

Writers

Thinkers

Teachers

Students

Bound together by a few moments in time

One of those perfect summer moments!

20170624_222414.jpg

June 24 – Silver Lake, MN

How do your thoughts become your ideas?  

What shapes your format?

Where does your organization come from?  

How do you share this process with your students?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      Process:

My first draft was totally a description – what I saw, heard and felt while outside

But it seemed really boring

And felt like it could be any lake anywhere

So this is Draft Two . . . after some revision!

 

#SOL17: “There’s No Place Like . . .”


Think back to a “Best Time of Your Life”.  Where were you?  What were you doing?  What made it “THE BEST”?

If you were to return to that place of your “Best Time of Your Life” right this minute, do you think it would be exactly as you remember it?

dorothy clicking her heels

“There’s no place like TCRWP!”

Picture this:

#TCRWP

Yesterday

1399 colleagues (?)

Magnificent Riverside Church

“We come from . . .”

A call to action from Lucy Calkins.

We can.

We must.

Ignite the passion

In our students.

“Don Murray: Writing is not easy nor should it be.”

We don’t just recount.

We make meaning in our writing.

And later,

To celebrate the day’s end

A thunderstorm

A double rainbow

double rainbow kitty donohoe

    A Double Rainbow:          Kitty Donohoe, Twitter

Ready to begin anew!

June Writing Institute 2013

My initiation

My trepidation

And yet, filling a hole in my teacher soul

June Writing Institute 2014

Back to fill in the holes in my knowledge

Back to “be with my tribe”

Still anxious about all I did NOT know

June Writing Institute 2015

Armed with a plan

Specific session criteria

And questions for staff developers.

June Writing Institute 2016

Finally knowing “something”

Writing before, during, and after

Adding new knowledge

Consolidating and validating previous learnings

and this year, waiting for

August Writing Institute 2017

Because there’s no place like home with your writerly friends

The Learning at

Teachers College Reading and Writing Project!

So this week I’m following along on Twitter

Checking in for “learning bread crumbs”

Planning for that return to “My Best Learning Place on Earth”!

#TCRWP Writing Institute and #TCRWP Reading Institute

I already know that even though I’m attending in August this year, #TCRWP Writing and Reading Institutes will be better than ever!  Much writing and reading (and tweets) before then . . . See you soon!

Where do you go for inspiration?  

That feeling of “belonging”?  

And yet, where you are also “pushed” to be a better you, a stronger you, a more capable you?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

#SOL17 and #DigiLitSunday: Problem Solving


In Real Life:

“Gramma, sit here.”

“H’mm. It’s a long way down to the floor.”

“Here, Gramma.”

I sit.  I can guess the activity by reading the clues in the area.

I don’t know for sure the plan but does it matter?  

Doesn’t the world revolve around my grandson?

How do I wait, without talking/leading, to see what “our play” is going to be?

In My Professional Life:

Book studies have popped up everywhere.  Which ones should I join?  Which ones are quite intriguing?  Which ones should I avoid?

My professional “shelfie” looks like this: (+Disrupting Thinking by Kylene Beers and Bob Probst)

shelfie.jpg

How do I determine what groups to participate in?  

For example, I know of three different groups reading and responding to Disruptive Thinking. Do I just jump in?  It’s summer after all and I do have more “time” to spend on reading and writing.  Do I develop criteria?  What could/should that look like?

Last week’s #G2Great chat was with Patty Vitale-Reilly (@pattyvreilly) about her book, Engaging Every Learner:  Classroom Principles, Strategies, and Tools.  You can read Chapter 6 of her book from Heinemann here, check out the storify here, or even read my blog post about the chat here.

Where do I think problems with “being an engaged learner” might arise?  Where should I begin? Right now I believe I need to pay attention to actions 1, 3, 5 and 6 below as I develop my plans to participate in book studies this summer.

  1. Consider the three dimensions of engagement
  2. Cultivate engagement in the classroom
  3.  Establish routines to cultivate high engagement
  4.   Use assessments to build engagement!
  5.  Use choice to build engagement
  6. Cultivate my own engagement

My decision is to see which of the aspects of “engagement” hook me into summer book groups and provide the incentive for me to continue participating.  By planning to “problem solve” in advance, both when I get stuck when reading and when my participation wanes, I can gather additional information about both my problem solving and my engagement!

What are you going to learn / study this summer to move your literacy life forward?

When do  I want/need/crave choice and creativity and what role will that play in my decisions/actions?




 

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

Additional #DigiLitSunday:  Problem Solving posts with Margaret Simon and Reflections on the Teche.

digilit-button

 

#SOL17: Discovery


joy write fletcher.JPG

What do I want to discover this summer?  

What’s my goal?  

How will I grow and learn?

I plan to continue to grow my writing skills.  I will work on narratives but I also want to discover or uncover additional ways that informational writing can be fun.  I want to practice with Weebly, infographics, and video.  My journey is sparked by a 2ndaryELA facebook post that led me to this weebly created by a junior as a result of a semester long genius hour project.  Whitefish Point

I want to deliberately and purposefully take the same information and write it in several different ways to see whether graphics or text structures make it more understandable.  I want to know when I “really own it”!

Topic – not yet chosen

My fascination with weebly . . .

What is Weebly?  print

Review with Pros and Cons of Weebly

Differences between Weebly and Word Press

What is Weebly?  (video)

I believe that I will actually be creating a “multi-genre report” as I simultaneously work on

1) writing stamina

2) becoming more familiar with my chromebook

3) documenting my learning

4) digging into writing craft and standards simultaneously

What do you plan to discover this summer?  Where will you find joy?  What will you own?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

Why?  Teachers’ Writing Matters

Storytelling

#DigiLitSunday: Story


digilitsunday

At the beginning:

Stories . .  . ahh . . . the dreaded narratives.  Those writing pieces with story arcs or mountains, plots, characters, . . . already stuck so I’ve googled and love this post What is a Story, and Where Does it Come From?

Second Start – Google Images 

story

Typing on a typewriter.  This was seen at the opening or closing of some TV shows when the writers were given credit.

story two

The places that you can go and see when you can imagine the story.

story three

That extra dimension when the reader takes you, quite literally, into the story!

Still in search of a story . . .

  1. There was once a young man who knew a lot about dinosaurs.  (In fact he knew more than his grandmother.)  When you named a dinosaur he would point to the correct one.  Tyrannosaurus Rex (T Rex), brontosaurus, stegosaurus, triceratops, and pterodactyl to name a few. This amazing two year old also knew that dinosaurs liked ice cream as he had the T Rex order ice cream at the shoppe.  His T Rex was partial to chocolate ice cream in a chocolate cone with chocolate sprinkles.  Chocolate all the way!
  2. Ten kids. During the Depression. One pair of shoes per child.  Of course they went barefoot at home, outside, while doing farm chores.  The extra warmth from the fresh cow pie was appreciated when frost covered the ground.
  3. Father, grandfather, uncle, great uncle, brother. All describe Uncle Leo.  But what I didn’t know about Uncle Leo was all the folks that he “rubbed elbows” with.  Strong family ties connect us across the ages, but now I know that he met and talked with Bobby Kennedy, Jimmy Carter and many other political and presidential folks.
  4. My shirt-tail cousin, one of the most famous baseball players of all time, Babe Ruth.  Babe Ruth was infamous both on the field and off the field.

Does it need to be MY story or can I retell someone else’s story?

I can make the story MY story by including the details that I find most fascinating.  I can leave out the details that are boring and get right to the heart of the story.  I can elaborate on the most unusual parts or where I “show, not tell” to develop the details.

What are your stories?  

How and when will you share?

story time

BRAVE Reflection


I’m a literacy consultant who works with seven districts.

How do I know if I’m being effective?  

Doing a good job?  

Doing what really works?

I have to start with the original . . . Clint Eastwood . . . same birth year as my dad who always kept me grounded!

good bad ugly

A Short Story

I’ve been traveling a lot over the last two weeks.  Over three thousand miles in a trip to Kentucky for an adorable grandson’s second birthday, then on to Florida with Mom and an aunt and uncle who is one of my mom’s younger brothers for a nephew’s high school graduation, and then back to Kentucky for some more time with the kids.

Was the trip successful?

Four possible data points might be these:

  • The number of miles driven successfully.  That is important because it was my first out of state road trip with my new car and then many miles driving a Ford 150 which is about three times the size of my car.  

What might constitute a success?  No flashing red or blue lights and no major problems.  The number of palindromes I noticed on my odometer and particularly the one as I traversed the Missouri River bridge in St. Louis.

What data would not point to a success?  Uncle Leo might say it was the number of times I drove over a curb.

  • The number of times my GPS and Aunt Shirley’s google maps agreed.  Less successful might be our decisions about which to follow when there was a disagreement.  

Success? Google maps was definitely more up to date than GPS.

Not a Success? The “shortest” trip was NOT always the ideal route to take.

  • The number of card games played.

Success?  The variety from hand and foot to pepper.

Not a Success? The number of 9’s and 10’s I had in EVERY pepper hand!

  • The variety of experiences and places we went.

Success?  Wading in the Atlantic, time with so many precious relatives, driving to the top of Lookout Mountain in Georgia, the flea market, a little homemade wine, the food, the movies, and stories after stories.  

Not a Success? Not driving back down Lookout Mountain (remember, not my vehicle!).

Do you notice a possible pattern?  

Each data point seems to have more than one side! 

If you had to sort these data points, could you find some summative as well as formative measures?

brave-word-art

So back to the beginning . . .

I’m a literacy consultant who works with seven districts.  How do I know if I’m being effective?   Doing a good job?   Doing what really works?

We collect a lot of data.  We spend a lot of time with data.  We spend a lot of time talking about data.  But do we EVER really address these questions?  Or does each question have multiple data points similar to those listed above.  This post is the result of many miles of driving and a push from Elizabeth Moore at Two Writing Teachers when she wrote this post last week, “Literacy Coaches:  How do you assess your impact?”  Beth talks about using goals, student-centered data, survey data and quantitative data in her post.

good bad ugly two

I have a ton of quantitative data to share.  At our agency we have had team Wildly Important Goals (WIGS) for two years focusing on our K-3 readers and using screener data to determine the effectiveness of our goals. I like to use them also as a beginning point when I reflect on my own effectiveness although they are only a small portion of my K-12 job.

WIG.jpg

PART ONE:

Here’s my data for four different types of my work in buildings by each month.

  • PDC = Professional Development in Core Literacy Instruction K-3
  • OCC = Observation/Coaching in Core Literacy Instruction Implementation K-3
  • PDI = Professional Development in Research-Based Interventions K-3
  • OCI = Observation/Coaching in Research-Based Intervention Implementation K-3

one data

The green boxes show that I met my goals which are also outlined below:

goal two

Good:

  • I met all four of my goals in December and in February.
  • I met my monthly goals 21 times.
  • I met my Observation/Coaching Intervention goal in December (after 5 months).
  • I met my PD Core and Observation/Coaching goals in January (after 6 months).
  • I met my total goal in January (after 6 months).

And to make me feel better . . .

  • My annual total for PDI was 94% so it was close.
  • Average percentage of goals met is 96.8%.
  • Total number of interactions was well above the annual goal just in a different distribution.  (146% above the goal)

Bad:

I missed my monthly goal 19 times. (19/40)

I met either one or zero monthly goals in August, March, April, and May. (4 months/10)

There were zeros in four categories across the 10 months. (4/40)

i did not meet my PDI annual goal.  (141/150)

Ugly: The hard reality of the data

August was not required for data collection but because it was almost a full month of work I decided to include the data.

I can offer excuses for the spring – horrific sudden death of my nephew and his wife in March and then my brother at the end of April, but the fact is that I only missed one PD session during either of those times – so excuses don’t change the data.

And if you would like to see the data in a larger format  – Data Here

good bad ugly three

PART TWO – How did students do on the screener administered in the fall, winter, and spring?  

Data is reported in terms of green boxes for buildings by grade levels if 80% of the students or more met the benchmarks set by the state. (Red if below 60% or fewer of the students met the benchmark criteria.) Districts can choose from several approved screeners but the state of Iowa only pays for one.

new data threenew data four

Good:

  • The total number of grades meeting benchmark by 80% or more by building increased from 7 in fall to 8 in winter with changing criteria.
  • The number of grades meeting benchmark criteria by 80% or more (green) building increased for kindergarten from 2 in fall to 4 in winter.
  • The number of first and third grades remained the same from fall to winter (3- first, 1-third).
  • The number of grades below 60% benchmark criteria decreased from 8 in fall to 3 in winter.
  • The number of grades below 60% benchmark criteria decreased from 8 in fall to 4 in the spring.

Bad:

Grades 1 and 3 did not have any buildings meeting 80% benchmark criteria in the spring and kindergarten and second had 2 and 1 respectively.

The spring green (80% benchmark criteria) was the lowest of the three reporting periods.

Ugly:

The 8 grade levels by building meeting 80% benchmark criteria in the winter dropped to 3 for the spring.

The 3 grade levels by building below 60% benchmark criteria at winter increased to 4 in the spring.

What questions arise?

How does this data compare to state-wide Iowa totals?

Which specific buildings have multiple levels of green?  or red?

What is working?  What is not working?

Is more practice needed across the day (distributed practice)?

Are discrete skills transferring to reading passages?

What about fidelity of implementation?  What does that data reveal?

Did we over rely on our winter successes that did NOT appear to transfer to spring benchmarks?

Brave = sharing this data publicly.

 It’s not all roses and sunshine.  What works in one building doesn’t necessarily transfer to what works in another building.

But, stop! 

Is all data equal?

  • How many students made growth?
  • How many students made significant growth?
  • How many teachers changed instruction based on the data?
  • How many teachers changed interventions based on the data?
  • What if the summative data (Iowa Assessments) shows a different picture of these same students?
  • How many students have reading goals for the summer?
  • How many students love reading?
  • How many students read at school by choice?
  • How many students read at home by choice?
  • How many students can name their favorite books?
  • How many students can name their favorite authors?
  • How many students can name their favorite illustrators?
  • And how do the students REALLY feel about school?

What data is missing from this snapshot?

Another short story

I am in total grandmother heaven.  He meets me at the door, takes my hand, leads me into the living room, and tells me what to do/play/where to sit.  “Gramma play.”  “Gramma here.” “Gramma ice cream.”  Gramma choo choo.” “Gramma dinosaur train.” I can’t even begin to count the number of times that I heard, “Where Gramma go?” during the last two weeks.  I count that as a success.  To disappear into another room and to be missed makes my heart melt!

Those are all data points that convince me that I’m doing a GREAT job as a grandma.  Are they numbers?  Are there specific criteria or cut points?

What data points match your school values and core instructional principles?  When do you need to make sure that you are triangulating data and not over relying on any one source?


If I had only shown you fall and spring student screener data, you would not have seen the growth that doesn’t seem to have been sustained.  That’s why my #OLW “BRAVE” is a part of this post.  This is our third year with this process. Because the cut points for benchmarks change annually, we can’t compare each grade level year after year but we can look at trend data to see whether grade levels of students continue to grow as the move up through the grades.

How are you reflecting on successes?  The good?  The bad?  The ugly?  

AND who are you reflecting with?

challenge

#SOL17: Voracious Readers


“Don’t read in the dark!” (Just yesterday in a hotel room while traveling!)

It’s my Kindle on my iPad.  It’s lit.

“When did you start reading?”

Have I ever NOT been reading?

I remember reading BEFORE I went to school for kindergarten.

And according to a first grader, “Was that before Columbus discovered America?”

I remember lying in front of a south window trying to sneak in a few more minutes of twilight reading hours.  In later years I remember having a flashlight and a book under my pillow in the camper so I could read if I wasn’t sleeping.  And now, now I read from my iPad.  Sometimes I read just a page or two.  Sometimes I flip back to an old boring friend and read just a page or two. And sometimes I read until the book ends!

My mantra:

voracious reader two

I checked out and read all the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books available from our public library in the 1960s and I credit those series for making me a serial reader – every book published by the author. (Note:  I love the new versions now available!)

Kylene Beers and Donalyn Miller (#TCRWP Reading Institute) have told us that series readers will be life-long readers.  Encourage students to embark on the exploration of a series OR TWO during the summer and they will be on the way to slowing or even stopping the “summer slide”!

Which books?

I’m not in favor of “mandated lists” because I believe that student choice builds a love of reading.  Here’s some advice . . .

voracious reader one

These eight bullets can help you, the teacher, increase your own voraciousness as well as  that of your students!

voracious reader creating one

Of course, building in a bit of humor as in “How would I rewrite the titles to fit a different concept?” can produce a graphic like “Hungry for Books”!

voracious reader

My final words:

voracious reader four

What does your reading list look like?

 How many TBR stacks do you have?  

When will you start/continue?  

How did YOU become a voracious reader?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

And what does this look like in a high school reading workshop???? How would you know if you have voracious readers?  Fabulous ideas from students incorporated into this rubric.

#DigiLitSunday: Better


better

Today’s call for slices from Margaret Simon at Reflections on the Teche immediately makes me think of HOW one gets better.  Previous posts about professional development are here, here, and here. I love learning.  I love learning with friends.  Therefore, one of the best tools that I use for professional development is Twitter because it truly is exemplified by this graphic.

good better best

What?

Learning.  Identifying a topic. Identifying a need.  Finding experts. Reading. Writing. Talking. Learning Together.  There are many ways to “Better Oneself” and one of the fastest routes is through TWITTER!

Start the Challenge

If you’re on Facebook, go to this post of Mary C Howard’s (author of Good to Great) for her Twitter 5-3-1 Challenge.

“TWITTER 5-3-1 CHALLENGE:
So I’m posing a summer challenge that will take very little time.

5: FOLLOW
Follow five people you admire. Just find them on Twitter and click the follow button on the far top right of their page.

3: RETWEET/LIKE
Retweet or like three comments that inspired you. Just click on the comment and then the up/down arrows at the bottom middle and hit retweet (or like with the heart at the bottom).

1: Reply
Make one comment to a tweet every day (even “Thank you.”) Just click on the left arrow at the bottom right and type.

I promise you that my 5-3-1 challenge will enrich you beyond measure this summer. Twitter is a treasure chest of inspiration, ideas, articles, posts, and dedication. If you’re not using it even to a small degree, you’re cheating yourself. This summer is a great time to dip your toe in the Twitter pool. I promise you that you’ll be grateful you did!”

My only addition is to make it the 5 -3 – 1 – 1 Challenge.

The final 1 – Find a chat

Weekly chats might be #TCRWP on Wednesdays or #G2Great on Thursdays.  Monthly chats might be #TitleTalk on the last Sunday of the month.  Additional chats like #TWTBlog may be scheduled after a series of blog posts.

Why a Twitter Chat?

A Twitter Chat will give you an opportunity to “rub elbows” with the experts and grow your own knowledge base as well as your PLN.  You will be amazed at the authors who are available to learn from as well as the inspiration, ideas, articles, and posts that Mary refers to above.

You are at the crossroad.  You must make the decision.

How will you better yourself?

good better

#SOL17 and #DigiLitSunday


cleaning+4.jpg

Recycle bin one full.

Recycle bin two full.

Recycle bin three full.

Just how much “stuff” can one person accumulate in 36,639 days?  Apparently a lot . . . As in three bins full.

Sorting . . .

To keep for myself because I purchased it

Free to a good home although I had purchased it

Extra copies that teammates or districts might not have

GONE . . . no need to keep  . . .

Organization is a tricky thing.  Keeping what is necessary. Eliminating waste.  But what if I need . . .?  In a digital world life does seem simpler. But yet, do I put this file in a generic location or file it under the group with who it was used.

Decisions, decisions, decisions . . .

If my focus is to be on working with students and staff, was I to borrow from their precious time to organize and clean up?  Did I use my own time?  But wait . . . my own time was already spent on travel and so at the end of the ten hour day I was done with work.

Vocabulary.com says clean is

“The meaning of clean usually refers to removing something unwanted: you clean your hands by washing them, then you can clean some grapes.

This word has many meanings related to being pure or empty. You clean a chicken by plucking its feathers, or get cleaned out when you lose all your money at poker. If a drug addict is clean, he’s no longer using. You can clean someone’s clock, clean up your act, or clean out a safe and make a clean getaway. If the floor is clean enough to eat off, it’s very clean. A clean life is morally pure.”  (link– and do note that I am interested in a clean manuscript as some point!)

How do we build this habit?

Daniel Tiger of PBS fame has it right with these lyrics:

“Clean up, pick up, put away
Clean up everyday”

And if you’re not around a small child, check out the video here!

A little bit every day . . .

Or memesuper says it another way . . .

ys073

Link

How do you end your work year?  

Have you cleaned and organized every day?  

Or do you need to have a deep cleaning to reorganize before leaving this year in the rear view mirror?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

digilit-button Additional #DigiLitSunday posts at Margaret Simon’s Reflections on the Teche here.

#SOL17: Learning Again


“Ma’m, I’m trying to help you.”

Trying. Yah. Right. Do you understand how frustrated I am?

“A service technician is scheduled for Thursday.”

But will he really show up? It’s been 40 days and I have ZERO patience left.

“I’m trying to do the best I can.”

That “trying” word again. When will this be fixed?  For real?  No more “trying”.

On a GOOD day, this is what my speed test looked like during the month of April.

5.9.17 1 pm speed test

And GOOD is  a relative description, because there were days when I could NOT even connect to run a speed test. The night that I spent more than an hour online with Customer Service because I was sitting at MacDonald’s in order to participate in a Twitter Chat.

Not at home.

21 miles away.

Waiting impatiently.

Because I had 0 connectivity.

No phone, no internet, NOTHING!

I was NOT a happy camper!

The issue:  internet connectivity  

The problem: too far from the “REAL” connections  

My issue:   day after day of dealing with customer service folks (after the computer) not linked to the program engineers/planners who schedule service repair calls

 What I have learned:

  1. My modem is a wireless modem.  
  2. The wireless router inside my house was redundant.  It cut the speed in half.
  3.  My modem does not have to be in the garage wired to the outside phone box.  It does not have to be subject to the extreme temperatures in the winter or summer. The modem now lives in the house where I can watch the flashing lights.
  4. All devices do not test the same on speed tests.  My Samsung phone and iPad mini routinely display faster times than my laptop.  However, my chrome book is not faster than my DELL.
  5. Unplugging my Verizon phone booster increases the speed; however, cell phones then do not work in the house so at best it’s a short term fix.

This morning’s speed test:

5.16.17 speed test

It’s not high speed internet service.  But it’s more than THREE times the download speed that I had last week.  It works best when only one device is running.

Lessons Learned:

Just like with “testing” or daily measurement ~

Growth does matter.

Growth cannot be discounted.

If there had been an arbitrary cut score, I would have given up days ago.

Multiple data points are needed.

“Trying” . . . when I couldn’t SEE any visible progress or effort quickly became a VERY ugly word!

Information is power.

Learning is important!

Result:  Back in the groove with a slice completed in 30 minutes from start to finish this morning!  

joyful




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      

And ALWAYS remembering . . .

“Not everything that can be counted counts, and

not everything that counts can be counted.” Albert Einstein

Doing The Work That Matters

a journey of growing readers & writers

Present Perfect

adventures in multiple tenses

Leadership Connection

from Great Prairie AEA

The Blue Heron (Then Sings My Soul)

The oft bemused (or quite simply amused) musings of Krista Marx -- a self-professed HOPE pursuing Pollyanna

Middle English

Life as an English teacher leader

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas, Strategies and Tools

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.

I Haven't Learned That Yet

This blog serves to document my path of learning and teaching.

Simply Inspired Teaching

A blog by Kari Yates

Reflections on Leadership and Learning

Sharing my learning experiences

AnnaGCockerille Literacy

The Generative Power of Language: Building Literacy Skills One Word at a Time

Reading to the Core

Just another WordPress.com site

Karen Gluskin

My Teaching Experiences and Qualifications

To Read To Write To Be

Thoughts on learning and teaching

Books and Bytes

Exploring the best of literature and edtech for the middle grades.

To Make a Prairie

A blog about reading, writing, teaching and the joys of a literate life

Raising Voices

Thoughts on Teaching, Learning, and Leading

chartchums

Smarter Charts from Marjorie Martinelli & Kristine Mraz