#SOL15: Oh, The Friends You Meet When The Places You Go!


friends

What a pleasure to meet up face to face with friends during my learning journeys!

isabella2015-06-20 11.27.492015-06-21 19.23.35

Seymour and Fran at ILA 2015National Harbor beachSol dinner

ncteSlicers2014-11-21 17.17.05day 3 tcrwp

It’s summertime,

No time for flashy app,

No time for learning something new.

Time to chuckle,

Time to laugh,

Time to remember –

Our talk,

Our laughter,

Our fun.

Thank you,

Friends and Framily!

slice

Tuesday is the day to share a “Slice of Life” with Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

Best of #ILA15: Did you see these resources?


International Literacy Association 2015 

Did you see all of these resources posted on Twitter this last week? Just one more reason that you all should be on Twitter for the professional resources and connections! (Check out the 30 blue live links!) In the interest of “organizing my files” from #ILA15, here are some resources that you might want to review!

ILA:  The Start of a Literacy Movement

Shiza Shahid – This is her TED talk, not her ILA speech, but well worth your time!

Professor Nana’s  “Summing it Up”

The Best of Twitter Quotes

ILA Literacy Daily:

Pam Allyn’s  “Reading is Like Breathing In; Writing is Like Breathing Out”

“Electric Opening Session Kickstarts ILA 2015 Conference”

“It Starts with You!” 

“Another Conference for the Books” 

“Literacy Conference Panel Weighs Teacher Prep”

Bruce Lansky’s  Poetry Olio Recap  “Saturday Night Live”

Education Week:  “Focus on the Standards without the Words ‘Common Core'”

Teachers for Teachers (Clare Landrigan and Tammy Mulligan):

Slice of Life:  Making Connections Through Laughter

“International Literacy Association 2015 – Be the Change You Want to See in the World!”

Pernille Ripp’s “The Five Truths of Reading”

Heinemann #ILA15 Live Blog

Saturday

Sunday

Katheleen Smith’s Notes from 7/18 at ILA

Miss Miller’s  “Because of ILA: Take Aways and Bring Backs” 

Carol Varsalona’s  “Positively Undone and Renewed”

Professor Nana’s  “What the ‘L’, Part 2″

Vicki Day’s  “Reflecting on #ILA15 – Number 1 Take Away”

and then in case you missed them, my posts about #ILA15:

  1. #ILA15: One Week and Counting
  2. #ILA15 Begins Tomorrow!!!
  3. #ILA15 Begins . . . Reading with Rigor
  4. #ILA15: Pre-Conference Day Learning
  5. #ILA15: Day 1 Treasure Trove
  6. #ILA15: Treasures Continued
  7. #ILA15: Sunday Treasures
  8. #ILA15: Monday Finale
  9. #ILA15 Reprise

Have you added any new blogs to follow?

Will you plan to attend #ILA16 in Boston next July?

#ILA15 Reprise


My final post about #ILA15.  A clever way to make the first International Literacy Association Conference last – start blogging before I arrive . . .with eager anticipation and continue blogging after I return home . . .reluctant to “end” the experience (This is my 9th post about ILA!).

Hmm. . . just like commencement.

Is it

Definition 1: a beginning? or

2: a ceremony in which degrees or diplomas are conferred on graduating students?

It all depends upon your perspective or point of view.

If you attended #ILA15, you have probably also returned home by now.  You have more bags of “stuff” than when you left.  Probably also a new book or two to read.  You check the calendar.  Time is fleeting. Depending on your location, the end of summer could be near.

You decide . . .

How will you put your learning to use?

learn

Will I be able to “name” your learning by your actions?

1. Do your students have voice and choice . . . and are they both inspired and empowered every day to be lifelong learners (the will and the skill)?

2. Do you look into the eyes of students, listen to their voices, and watch their actions (and not just on standardized tests) in your quest to find out what they know and what they need next?

3.  Do you model what you “preach” as in, do you REALLY lead a readerly and writerly life?  Do you communicate how reading and writing have transformed your own personal life with evidence of its authenticity?

4.  Do you truly provide the necessary supports so that ALL children in your care THRIVE every day at school? (No inadvertent shame?)

5.  Do you still have a list of things you MUST learn YET this summer in order to be the best possible teacher, coach or leader next year?  Have you asked anyone for help so that you don’t have to take your learning journey alone?

If you answered “YES” to all five of those questions, then you can choose one fun book and then one professional book to alternately read until your TBR (To Be Read) stack is depleted.

If you answered “YES” to four out of five of those questions, then you need to prioritize your learnings YET for this summer and get busy “learning” about 30 hours each week.

If you were in neither of the two categories above, you need to think seriously about Why you teach? Who you serve? and Your beliefs about education?  Only the brave at heart can truly teach ALL students. It’s not an EASY job.  Continue at your own risk because the students do not get “Do overs”! Their lives are forever in YOUR hands!

High Expectations!

Choose your adventure! It’s all up to YOU!

Which path are you on?

How will you know if your students are successful?

How will you know if you are successful?

What’s the next step on your learning journey?

(Didn’t attend ILA?  Would you like a quick summary?  Here’s the ILA view!)

#ILA15: Monday Finale


ILA

The general session that began Monday’s learning at #ILA15 was notable!  Stephen Peters shared that “My teacher thought I was smarter than I was, so I was!” To learn more about him, check out his biography here.

vaccine

And then Academy Award winner Octavia Spencer was interviewed by a panel that included two freshman students from a local high school who asked her questions about how to prepare for a career and even whether parents should have to answer questions from their child.  Smart, witty, fun . . . and on the importance of reading as Octavia shared that she struggled with reading and dyslexia.

Game Changers:  Using Sports and the Power of Adolescent Literature to Transform the World

Sharon Draper and Chris Crutcher

Laughter, long and constant, emanated from our conference room as Sharon and Chris answered questions from the audience.  Here are some of the quotes that I captured from these YA authors who have also been classroom teachers.

Chris – “The only people who are ruined by their experiences are the people who allow it.  I’ve seen people stand up under pressure, when I would have folded.”

Sharon – “Leave a door open, without being Pollyannish (not everything is going to be ok). I have to leave hope, not desperation and despair at the end of the book!”

Chris – “I would have failed Ms. Draper’s class but I would have still learned from her class. I ailed other classes, but I still learned something!”

Sharon on Diversity- ” Students, whether Black or Latino, need to see themselves in books and others as well!  Classroom library needs to be diverse regardless of the makeup of the class!”

Chris on language (curse words and the F bomb)-“It’s the language of ‘anger/rage’ so it’s natural. I want to hear your story in your native tongue.”

On writing, rejection, and editors:

Sharon, “I sent out 25 letters, 24 were no, 1 yes from Simon and Schuster.  When you turn in a manuscript,  you know nothing.  Find your own path.  Just because you know how to climb Mt. Everest doesn’t make it any easier the second time because you have done it before. Still hard, just know what to expect.”

chris and Sharon

Take Away:  Authors that write REAL books for kids, write from what they know and the kids that they see on a regular basis.  It’s hard work to craft a book so the content and details are still relevant 10 years later.

Transforming Understanding Through Informational Read Alouds

Seymour Simon and Linda Hoyt

What a star-studded ending to the conference with Linda and Seymour and a room packed to overflowing for the last session of the conference!  I was excited to meet my “Science Guy” as we evaluated the credibility of Seymour as a science expert during a TCRWP workshop earlier in July!  And yes, he fit our EXPERT category!

Seymour and Fran at ILA 2015

Seymour Simon began by showing the craft techniques that he uses in his many books:

  • Comparisons
  • Action words
  • Engage senses to set the scene
  • Ask questions
  • diagrams and photographs
  • Descriptive Detail

Seymour also shared a sample of the work that he has done as a publisher at Star Walk Kids. 500+ ebooks are available with more than half as nonfiction. I loved that he worked in a shout out to Mary Ehrenworth, Teachers College (TCRWP) and Twitter,  “a unique opportunity for teacher to talk about education in a universe of teachers interested in the same work”.

“EVERY teacher should read aloud daily!   Every book I write, I have to read aloud.”

And then pearls of wisdom from Linda Hoyt:

How do we make time for Informational Read Alouds?

“Shorten fiction read alouds. Put short informational Read Alouds into science and social studies to load up the heads and hearts of students. Make time. Informational Read Alouds do not need to be boring.  Be picky about what you read.”

Qualities of great informational texts for Read Alouds:

  • beautiful language
  • high quality visuals
  • test language – Does it beg to be read aloud?
  • Is it projectionable? (so kids can see the text)
  • You do NOT have to start reading on page 1 and read until the end.

We practiced with some text.  Be cautious in saying all text should be a Read Aloud.  This should be GREAT text. Teach kids that read alouds vary and where, why, and when we adjust them. Brian Cambourne’s Seven Conditions of Learning were included as well as a study of university students who are being read to at the University of Woolangong in ann adult study of the effect of Read Alouds on adult learning.

Linda shared a fourth grade persuasive PSA from Mrs. Fitpatrick’s class,  “Pulling over for emergency vehicles”, as an example of student work after learning through Read Alouds.

What are the connections between Read Alouds and writing?

Elevate Engagement

Build Capacity for Deep Thinking and Memory

Distribute Discourse

Recast Conversation Patterns

Pause to sketch, to think, to visualize and talk . .

“Lester Laminack advocates for seven Read Alouds each day. I go with three – only 1 is interactive – so students can FEEL what happens! ( Fiction, NF, and writing craft – ex. lead)”

Take Away:  A mix of fiction and informational text Read Alouds needs to be thoughtful, planned, practiced, and executed multiple times each day for ALL students! 

What do you want to remember from this finale post?

What will linger with you?

#ILA15: Sunday Treasures


learn

What learning treasures did I find on a Sunday in St. Louis at #ILA15?

1. “I Hate Reading:  Strategies Transforming Negative Self-Perceptions into Confidence

Justin Stygles

I find Justin’s work with #contraliteracy to be fascinating.

20150719_090319

The sources are common. These “unintended negative effects” surround students, especially at the middle school age who are already both hyper-sensitive and hyper-critical of themselves and any “perceived’ slights.

How do we move beyond the many faces of shame?

1. Build Relationships with our readers.  Admit, Acknowledge and Absolve them of past practices.

2. Use Self-Perception Scales to help students understand their own perceptions.

3. Have students tell their reading histories.  Listen for the patterns.

4. Plan quality instruction

Be passionate about your invitation to ALL students to reading and writing

Remove all competition from reading

Provide access to print – print that students beg to read

Define what students can control – when and where can they find minutes to read?

Provide a reading mentor not a reading dictator (x number of pages, only this text, etc.)

One strategy that Justin has found to be successful for his readers is 30 Books in 30 Days Read Alouds.  This promotes intimacy, relationships with characters, and connections with life as students practice strategies, form opinions, discover new interests and allows some above grade level reading.

Take Away:  Independent and Autonomous Readers are Needed

20150719_095637

2. Literacy Changed Their Lives:  Teaching Reading as Writing with Picture Biographies

Jan Miller Burkins  and Kim Yaris

Because I love their book, Reading Wellness, this session was an automatic choice as soon as I saw the #ILA15 program!  From the opening, “What are you on about?” to our ending dance, this session was absolutely FUN learning!

Which character in the picture is most like you?

20150719_111543

There is a relationship between posture and success and creating positive change is important.  This can be done through:  3 Gratitudes, Journaling, Exercise, Meditation, or Random Acts of Kindness.  How do we define happiness?  Have you seen this TED talk?  The Happy Secret to Better Work with Shawn Achor

The whole concept of “Lean in, Lean Out” was explored with some adult pictures as well as student pictures.  More information in their book, Reading Wellness:  Lessons in Independence and Proficiency.  As we moved on, Jan modeled the thinking from a Heart, Head, Hands, and Feet lesson using Ken Robinson’s The Element.  

The real learning came when we partnered, read a picture biography and created a “Heart, Head, Hands, and Feet” drawing for our book.  What a fun way to REALLY provide hope, inspiration and the power of positive thinking for career choices for students.  There truly are actions that students can begin to take NOW to more fully explore possible careers.

Take Away:  Biographies need to be carefully chosen to include childhood actions and balance of the four elements (alignment, balance, sustainability, and joy) is critical. 

20150719_124107

Just go to www.burkinsandyaris.com to see more information about “HHHF” lessons!  It will be time well spent!

3.   Writing From Sources is More Than “…the Text Says”: Support Thoughtful, Engaging Writing about Texts

Chris Lehman

Encouraging students to move beyond BORING information writing is a passion of mine so this session was also on my must attend list and then the fact that it was “CHRIS LEHMAN” presenting meant that I had high expectations that were completely MET! (Note: This session was so full that Penny Kittle was even sitting on the floor in the front!  Amazing!)

I first met Chris Lehman at a 50 minute closing workshop during a Teachers College summer institute so I know just how much compelling information he can pack into an hour.  And WOW!  What a lesson in “passionate” reading, writing, viewing, speaking, and listening!

Chris’s basic premise was:  What happens if we switch from this argumentative stance in writing

20150719_131154

to a more invitational stance?

20150719_131258

This invitational stance can still be persuasive and/or meet the requirements of claim, evidence, etc of the grade level standards in CCSS.W.1.  The writing from this stance will be much more interesting while providing compelling information for the reader.

Chris provided the opportunity for us to practice using this invitational stance with a topic of our own choice or the topic of Pluto that he introduced us to in the opening minutes of the session. The stance carried over into sources as well.  “What is it like to have a conversation with a source when you feel something about the topic/text?”  Do we provide that opportunity for students? The whole idea of “reading with someone in mind (to share the information with later) led to some LOUD partner practice in a jam-packed room.  Curiosity. Passion. Interest. Not copying. Not plagiarizing.

And then some masterful thinking about the “source” of information.

  • “Teach appositive phrases, which is what this is, to students.
  • Study mentor texts that TEACH about sources
  • Bring learning about sources into your teaching (who is NASA?)”

Chris modeled this by describing his friend Barb who taught him about Bitmoji.  Knowing a bit more about the background of the source in the introduction changed the whole tone of the piece. Check this example out!

“In 1920, before Fitzgerald was Fitzgerald, before  the Great Gatsby, before Paris, before Hollywood, before most English literature lessons of today, Mr. Fitzgerald was a struggling alcoholic writer from Minnesota.”

That was just one sentence but think of the context, tone, mood and information that was conveyed.  Was this “copied” from a book?

If you need more ideas about research, you won’t go wrong with Chris’s book,  Energize Research Reading and Writing: Fresh Strategies to Spark Interest, Develop Independence and Meet Key Common Core Standards, Grades 4-8 and you can read an excerpt here

Take Away:  Be passionate about learning and writing and move writing to an invitational stance that shows students how authors provide facts and information about sources without “copying”!

 4.  Metacognition:  The Transformative Power of Reflective Thinking

Tanny McGregor

Is “metacognition” just a buzz word?

The National Academy of Sciences in their report “How Students Learn” said that the key to effective learning, after 600 pages of research findings, was metacognition.  John Hattie lists metacognitive strategies as 14th out of 138 influences on achievement and Marzano says that metacognition is the “mission control” of the thinking process.  Metacognition is more than just a buzz word and in fact, is necessary for students to be reading writing, speaking, listening, and thinking at high levels.

With instruction and time for practice, students in even the primary grades can learn about metacognition and practice their thinking skills.  It may look gimmicky at first, especially if the teacher dons a “thought bubble” to model and show their thinking to students.  Talk, sketching, images, video, the use of complex text – all of these can be used to enhance thinking and reflection for our students.

Take Away:  Students can use a silhouette of a head with a “brain-shaped” space to write their thinking to emphasize that it comes from the brain!

5. A Non-Freaked Out Approach to Literacy Instruction Across the Content Areas

Dave Stuart

4:45-5:45 (Still here learning!)

Are you a middle school or high school teacher?  Do you work with middle school or high school teachers?  Do you know Dave Stuart?  His blog?  His “Non-Freaked Out Approach to the Common Core?

This hour spent with Dave was an hour of pure gold and many, many ideas to consider about both the volume and the quality of literacy activities, reading, writing, speaking, and listening, across the day for students in middle schools and high schools.

Dave asked us to share our responses first with a partner, then with the group and /or on twitter to this question:

What, in one sentence, is your ultimate goal for students?

Dave also talked about getting past “argument’s baggage” because “…the goal is not victory but a good decision…in which a participant takes seriously and fairly the views different from his or her own.” (CCSS, Appendix A).  Dave shared his “pop-up method” where he teaches or assesses 1-2 specific skills every time.  So this time might be a claim and a paraphrase.  Next time it might be adding on to someone else’s comment so that the skills for quality discussions/arguments/debates are specifically taught over time. His management tips:

1. No cross talk.

2. Teacher = coach

3. Every kid needs to speak.

4. “Great debaters can debate all sides.”

5. ” We all win with a great debate.”

6. Teach and assess 1-2 skills at a time.

7. Content and delivery.

I especially found his three types of writing to be helpful when thinking of ELA and Content Teachers. More conversation about the purpose of writing (to solidify or extend learning) could make this less “threatening” for content area teachers.

Provisional – DAILY – warm ups and exit tickets

Readable – WEEKLY – 1 paragraph compositions

Polished – monthly – longer essays

If you need more information about writing more and grading less go to mikeschmoker.com

TAKE AWAY:  Debates and more writing can help build thinking and communication skills that will transfer to real-world success!

YOUR TURN:

What “Treasures” did you find today?

What thinking / ideas do you want to carry forward into the next school year?

Image

Tuesday is the day to share a “Slice of Life” with Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

#ILA15: Treasures Continued


What messages am I hearing every day at #ILA15?

Teachers Matter!

Kids Count!

Ask students what they need

Words Hurt

Engagement Matters

Read More

Data is more than a number

ILA

What treasures remained from Saturday’s sessions at #ILA15?

1. The Writing Thief: Using Mentor Texts to Teach the  Craft of Writing

     Ruth Culham, Kate Messner, and Lester Laminack

Mentor texts in the form of fiction and nonfiction picture books  provide teachers with a powerful teaching strategy to help students of all ages learn to write.  Good models come in many forms:  picture books, chapter books and everyday texts that allow students to study craft techniques in order to create their own strong writing using the writing process.

Ruth Culham shared some of her beliefs about mentor texts that are elaborated in Writing Thief. She read Bully to us as we focused on the reader’s view and then had us “re-read” paying attention to the author’s craft and studying the writing as an author.

one

She also shared a video from the author about the book.  Her text includes Author Insights from:  Lester Laminack, Lola Schaefer, Nicola Davies, Toni Buzzeo, Ralph Fletcher, David Harrison, and Lisa Yee.

Kate Messner shared her writing mentors:  Beverly Cleary and Judy Blume.  They taught her how to read like a writer and how to find mentors on her own bookshelf when there were not live mentor authors in her hometown.  Kate also shared that her own daughter knows how to find mentors.  Merely by asking, “How are you doing that?” she found her own hula-hoop mentor. We should use that question with students and encourage students to query authors using that question to grow their own knowledge of the skills and strategies that authors use. Kate reminded us that mentor texts are found in the books that we love, so students who are readers will also have the background necessary to be a writer!

Lester Laminack wants Read Alouds to be FUN for students.  He does not want every Read Aloud to be an “interactive read aloud” and even said that you can only “unwrap” the gift of a book once – let kids get lost in the story the first time. Lester is fun, funny and literally pulls no punches.  My favorite quote was that “Read Alouds should be like drug dealers: deliver a little somethin’ somethin’ today, then come back tomorrow and deliver a little more somethin’ somethin’ on a schedule.”  Showing up, delivering, creating a deep need and continuing to meet that need.

Read Alouds feeding the soul.

Read Alouds helping students grow.

Read Alouds for fun.

Take Away:  Mentors are all around us:  books, authors, teachers, and yes, even students!  Choose and use wisely!

2.   In Defense of Read-Aloud 

       Steven Layne

Steven Layne literally had to stop his presentation to wipe the tears, from laughter, from his own eyes.  Steven provided an overview of some of the instructional highlights from his book. Chapter one, In Defense of Read Alouds, is basically an overview of Why Read Alouds are needed.  This is one of two slides listing benefits.

three

Launching a book requires intentional planning.  Teachers carry an invisible backpack that includes their schema, but care needs to be included in developing schema with students.  An example that Layne used was The Giver which would need two and a half 40 minute class periods to launch WELL!  It’s a complex text.

The shared letters were my favorites, letters and responses to:

Witless in Walla Walla

Addled in Anchorage

Troubled in Telluride

Crazy in Calabasa

And if you are relatively new to Read Alouds, you may want to check out chapter 4, “The Art of Reading Aloud”.

Take Away:  All students deserve carefully planned Read Alouds that introduce them to all genres of texts in order to find personally loved texts.

3.   Accountability, Agency, and Increased Achievement in Independent Reading

       Jennifer Serravallo

     4:45-5:45 p.m.

Hundreds of teachers attending a session at this hour of the day on the first full day of the conference?  REALLY?

Yes, it’s true!

Jennifer Serravallo masterfully led us through some possibilities for instruction and conferring to meet student self-chosen goals.  With accomplishment of these goals, students will also increase their motivation to read and their student reading growth.

Beginning Point:

How much time is spent on reading?

Do classrooms have books?

Great questions that can jump start student reading!

four

I love this look at Hattie’s rating scale.  It’s a great visual to remind us of the importance of that .40 effect size lynch pin (the light blue area). Kids need to read a ton but with goals and feedback they will be successful.  Jennifer referenced some of the visuals from her book.

strategies

As with her previous texts, Conferring with Readers, Teaching Reading in Small Groups, The Literacy Teacher’s Playbook K-2 or 3-5, I knew this was a great book but I have an even greater appreciation now that I understand the depth of care and attention given to each of the strategies.

I also believe that we need to “Teach strategies based on student needs – not just off of Pinterest randomly”. And the fact that we need to use common language in our buildings that matches the assessment language was clearly explained with “not slip and slide that may have come from Pinterest.”  We must work on consistency of language in our classrooms for STUDENT success, not just because “I like this idea that I found somewhere”!  Student learning is at stake!

Prompts fit these basic five categories.  Do you know the differences?

  • compliment
  • directive
  • redirection
  • question
  • sentence starter

When and why would you vary your use of these five types of prompts?

This is a great text that is going to be so helpful for teachers!!!

Take Aways:  The goal of strategies is to learn the skill so well that the reader uses the strategy automatically on a regular basis!  Students must be a regular part of goal setting!

Many sessions still remain at #ILA15.  Did you attend any of these sessions?

What would you add?

What are you hearing at #ILA15?

#ILA15: Day 1 Treasure Trove


Using Assessment to Understand, Instruct, and Engage Our Readers

Clare Landrigan and Tammy Mulligan

I was literally “Star Struck” with Jan Burkins, Jennifer Serravallo, Lynne Dorfman and Rose Capelli in the room.  It was packed with many folks sitting on the floor around the edges of the room.

What an absolute TREAT to spend two hours with the authors of this book!

assessment-in-perspective

Click on the book to go to Stenhouse to preview the text. Use the back arrow to return to the blog post.

Clare and Tammy began by sharing about their work with teachers in New England. They ask district folks to think together and not purchase anything besides REAL books. They agree with ILA that the most innovative tool out there is Teachers!

Think of the song, “It’s all about the bass”.  You’ve probably also heard it as, “It’s all about the books”.  I believe that Clare and Tammy would rewrite that as: “It’s all about the kids.”

  • “At the end of the day, it’s about teachers having time to live and think and look into the eyes of the kids.”

Three Things We Know for Sure

1. Assessment is more than a number.

2. Assessment and instruction are inseparable.

3. Our instruction can meet high standards and still be developmentally appropriate.

Clare and Tammy engaged us with a story about Timmy (data rich and information poor) that is included in their book.  At the lab school, anything and everything had been tried with Timmy but he was now in second grade and nothing was working.  He wasn’t a happy camper because he was quite frustrated.  After a blowup and then time to calm down, here’s what he said, in his own words, in this slide “Missing the Story”.

Screenshot 2015-07-19 07.03.27

See Timmy knew that he didn’t know how to read and in fact had overheard others say that he NEVER would learn to read. Simply by ASKING Timmy and including him in the work of “learning to read”, Timmy was already on his way!

Six months later, this is what Timmy wrote (captured on this slide titled “The Diagnosis is Often in the Story”).

Screenshot 2015-07-19 07.12.34

How do we involve students in assessments?

When do we ask them what’s happening? When do they matter?

Mantra:

Teachers matter!

Kids Count!

We watched videos, talked about what we saw, discussed assessments and thought about how data is really a four letter word and that sometimes we MUST focus on the qualitative data that tells so much more than JUST the numbers!

*    *    *    *    *

The theme of “Kids count!”  “It’s all about the kids” played out through all my Saturday sessions.  I will write more later. It’s time to get started on today’s new learning!

but just  a hint . . .before I go . .

Do you REALLY know how funny Lester Laminack is?  Steven Layne?  More treasures to be shared!

And then an hour with Jennifer Serravello . . . What a day!

How was your “Learning Saturday”?

#ILA15: Pre-Conference Day Learning


Pre-conference day . . . a day to get the conference up and running.  For some a day to visit, vacation, or view some local attractions.

keep-calm-and-be-marvelous-3

For others, a day of learning!  Day 1 of #ILA15 in St. Louis with @LitLearnAct.  A  MARVELOUS day of learning!  Institute 09 – Reading with Rigor:  Interpreting Complex Texts Using Annotation and Close Reading Strategies wth Dana Johansen and Sonja Cherry-Paul, the authors of this Heinemann text.

Friday

What is rigor?

There are many definitions of rigor and the dictionary ones are not conducive to joyous literacy learning. We created posters among our table groups of our own definitions of rigor.  This view of rigor extends the possibilities for our students.

rigor

What are some common myths about “rigor”?

1. Rigor means increasing homework for the students.

2. Rigor means students should do more and more work.

3.  Rigor is for some students but definitely not for ALL students.

4. With rigor, students should be able to do the learning without any supports or scaffolds.

5. The more resources you have and use, the more rigor increases for students.

6. No need to worry about rigor; the standards cover it.

7. Rigor is an addition to the curriculum.  So of course, you are going to have to take a favorite unit out of your school year.

8.  A teacher who is teaching with rigor will be a “Mean” teacher.

Of course, none of those myths are true according to Barbara Blackman in this resource.

rigor blackburn

How many of those have you heard?  

How many of those do you believe?

Stop, pause and have a moment of reflection.  How does this match your current knowledge and your thinking?

So just how do we keep the “FUN” and yet learn?

Listen carefully to what the girl says in this video.  Do you have any doubt about what she does and does not know?

She does say, “This is really hard.”  But she also says, “It’s so fun!”

Is that what your students are saying?

Are you sure?

We spent some time on the three components of text complexity.  There are three components of text complexity and the basic triangle has been included here before. It’s not just lexile levels and there are many “mis-matches” listed in that post that happen when ONLY lexiles are used to determine who should read any text.  Donalyn Miller, The Book Whisperer, also explores lexile mis-matches in “Guess My Lexile”. Both Dana and Sonja encouraged everyone to consider all three elements at the same time when evaluating texts in order to truly find texts that will raise the thinking of the readers and not just promote reading through the text mindlessly.  To think about:

How are wordless picture books rated on text complexity?

( :-) That’s something that I have put on my list to research but it won’t happen during this conference!)

Where and how do we find complex texts?

Drum Roll, please . . .

There is NO magic list of complex text.

There is NO magic list of complex text.

There is NO magic list of complex text.

Text selection should depend on the students, their needs, the strategies they know, the strategies they need, their data, and their interests!  Text selection should not be the same, year after year, after year, after year, after year!

How much text should be used for a “Close Read”?

This has been answered previously; but only as much text as is needed.  An entire text is NOT read closely.  Doug Fisher’s beliefs in a range from three paragraphs to three pages was shared.  NOT a whole book!  Only pick the part of a text that is worthy, be strategic, because you are going to read that text over and over and over and over!  You may have to trick the students into rereading by changing the purpose and the questions. The questions you raise should drive them back into the text and be so interesting that the students want to answer them. For over forty years we have had data that tells us that rereading improves comprehension.

The session title included annotation so the next section in the day’s learning was not a favorite of mine. I love the simplicity of “Know/Wonder” charts because I don’t need to xerox story pages in order to WRITE on the texts.  (Know/Wonder source  – What Readers Really Do:  Teaching the Process of Meaning Making by Vicki Vinton and Dorothy Barnhouse)The CCSS say to “read closely” but the word annotation is not in the standards.  It is one way to read closely.  However, if a list of “codes” is handed to students and they mindlessly mark up the text, the students are missing the benefit of “listening to the text” and “writing to explain their thinking”!  That’s where the power is – not in pages that are bleeding highlighting or have complicated annotated code that students cannot and do not talk about!  Goals for annotation:  Mark only the most important sections.  Write down your thinking IN WORDS!”

Texts that we used for annotations:

“Casey at the Bat”

“How to Paint “a Donkey” by Naomi Shihab Nye

“Caged Bird” by Maya Angelou

La Luna 2011 Pixar

A Nation’s Hope: Joe Louis by Matt de la Pena

I appreciated the practice with texts.  “Walking the talk” as adults for those tasks that we ask students to do is always important to me.  All of these included conversations about “What makes this complex text?”

And then we moved to Text Dependent Questions. These are huge in the Publishers’ Criteria.  However, if you have a “Word” version of the ELA standards, search for the phrase “Text Dependent Questions” and see what your results are!

“No one can analyze or interpret texts without bringing themselves to the text.”

In this section, we worked with “Last Kiss” by Ralph Fletcher and had great conversations about whether a question that required inferencing beyond the words of the text was a “Text Dependent Question”.  At this stage it really makes sense to think about a variety of questions that are well balanced at the different DOK levels!!!

Quiz (If you know the text “Last Kiss”)

“If you were to interview Ralph’s mom, what question would you ask in order to find out how his mom feels about the dad not kissing Ralph good night anymore as a part of the bedtime ritual?”

Text Dependent?  

High Level?  

What are you thinking?

Literary Elements include many areas for instruction.  We spent some time on symbols and talking about how patterns of repetition by an author could lead the reader to symbols.  We looked at symbols in the “Last Kiss” and then  discussed what they meant and how we gathered evidence to support our views. (Symbols:  jellyfish, fireflies, handshake, “the kiss”, absence of the kiss)

Cartoons (do our students REALLY understand them?) . . .  Many students don’t really see the humor so they might be great sources of short text to practice on with students. Depending on the age of your students, you might look to “Calvin and Hobbes” to see how students explain what is really happening in the cartoon strip.

We also spent some time on the pitfalls or challenges of Nonfiction.  We explored an immigration text set that included a picture, first person recollection, and immigration statistics from the Library of Congress. .

Specific Challenges from a Black and White Picture:

  • Not in color
  • Can’t zoom in or out to examine specific details
  • What is this about?
  • Main idea?
  • Need background knowledge
  • Is the title helpful?
  •  Steerage passengers taking it easy on ocean liner . . . or is that a “sad” version of humor!

Do the challenges increase or decrease when additional source documents are added? What do you think?

Who should be generating the questions?

What do the standards say?

Session Takeaways:

It is possible to teach toward the ambitious new goals of the Common Core Standards.

Teachers and students need to use knowledge to sort, question, reank, synthesize, interpret, and to apply knowledge.

Teachers need to continue to READ complex texts collaboratively and share their thinking and the puzzles that remain.ILA

#ILA15 Begins . . . Reading with Rigor


And so it begins . . .

My pre-conference session, “Reading with Rigor:  Interpreting Complex Texts Using Annotation and Close Reading Strategies” today is with the authors of this book.

Friday

Today, from 9 am to 5 pm, all day, with these two talented ladies. Sonja Cherry-Paul and Dana Johansen.  One hour closing workshop at #tcrwp last year gave me enough info/fuel for ages.  Hmm? What will I learn in an entire day?

Here’s what Lucy Calkins says about them in the foreword of their book:

“You’ll join these two extraordinary teachers in demythologizing the essential skills of Common Core aligned reading and in teaching those skills in such a way that students own them.”  LC

And

“…Dana and Sonja are crystal clear about the fact that increasingly, the role of a literacy teacher needs to be to empower students to be active agents of their own learning.” LC

And

“At the same time that they offer us inspiration and grounding in their very best teaching ideas, they also offer the very best practical details, procedures and materials needed for day-to-day, high-caliber teaching – the support so many of us desperately need to do our jobs even more than we have before.” LC

The #ILA15 program says –

“Presenters will create an engaging, hands-on learning environment to achieve the following learning objectives:

– Participants will learn strategies they can use with students for close reading, annotation, shared reading, and independent reading.

– Using an interactive, hands-on approach participants will explore ways to teach students how to identify and analyze literary elements such as symbolism, theme, mood, and figurative language, in ways that lead to stronger interpretation of complex texts.

#ILA15 Begins . . .

St. Louis?  Yes, St. Louis!

Here’s my writing room for the next four days!

room

What will you be learning at ILA15?

What will you be writing about?

#ILA15 Begins Tomorrow!!!


IRA now ILA = International Literacy Association

I’ve skipped over this paragraph in the ILA materials (probably 100 times now), but please slow down and read it . . .

“Illiteracy is a solvable problem, and together, we can make a difference! Amplify your efforts by joining forces with us at ILA 2015 in St. Louis, where you’ll get information and inspiration to transform your students’ lives. Register now for this can’t-miss event, where you’ll experience endless opportunities to network and learn—and leave feeling part of a meaningful movement, resolved to end illiteracy.”

And this . . .

“Literacy—across all sectors, mediums, and channels—is increasingly critical. In order to effectively prepare children and adults for the future, teachers must be well prepared to help diverse students improve their literacy skills.”

Whether illiteracy or aliteracy is a concern for you, follow the twitter stream on #ILA15 to LEARN from July 17 pre-conferences to the sessions on July 18-20 in St. Louis!  Who defines well-prepared?  Are your current efforts REALLY working for ALL your students?

#Amplify

#TogetherBetter

What are you learning this summer that will improve student literacy?

How will you use your learning?

How will you share your learning?

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas and Resources

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.

I Haven't Learned That Yet

This blog serves to document my path of learning and teaching.

Simply Inspired Teaching

A blog by Kari Yates

Reflections on Leadership and Learning

Sharing my learning experiences

AnnaGCockerille Literacy

The Generative Power of Language: Building Literacy Skills One Word at a Time

Reading to the Core

Just another WordPress.com site

Karen Gluskin

My Teaching Experiences and Qualifications

To Read To Write To Be

Thoughts on learning and teaching

Books and Bytes

Exploring the best of literature and edtech for the middle grades.

To Make a Prairie

A blog about reading, writing, teaching and the joys of a literate life

Raising Voices

Thoughts on Teaching, Learning, and Leading

chartchums

Smarter Charts from Marjorie Martinelli & Kristine Mraz

teachu92

books and educational topics

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,550 other followers