Tag Archives: learning

#NCTE18: Saturday


Screenshot 2018-11-18 at 5.29.34 AM

The  magical learning continues at  #NCTE18 and a theme that emerged on Saturday:

Slow down . . .

Yes, there is a sense of urgency. 

Make every minute count.

BUT stop counting every minute. 

Stop.

Slow Down.

Look into the eyes, heart and soul of every student. 

The day flew by and again there were folks that I never saw. Decisions about sessions were incredibly hard to make.

The #BowTieBoys, Jason Augustowski and Dr. Mary Howard 

It is all about the heart. And paying attention to the students. Listening. And learning WITH them. This quote from Jason is a great snippet for teachers to consider.

Screenshot 2018-11-18 at 5.36.14 AM

Roundtable sessions planned and executed by the students. Simply amazing.

Articulate

Poised

Powerful

Interactive

Showing not just telling

Students from middle school through high school.

Not to be missed!

Screenshot 2018-11-18 at 5.50.50 AM


Responsive Teaching:  The Courage to Follow the Lead of the Reader

Screenshot 2018-11-18 at 5.53.45 AM

The respect, love and joy of this panel made my day!  Students at the heart of our work.

 

A perfect merger.  And such important work!

Think about a teacher who loved you into being.  Responsiveness begins with heart . . .”
Don’t rush to “check it off”.  Skill and expertise has to come behind. Don’t land on the side of “judgment”.  “What’s going on?” “Wonder.” And then the learning that comes from the four quadrants.  

“Step back so your students can step forward.” Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris


Tom Newkirk has been a favorite of mine from my first #NCTE conference when he bemoaned that “the hamburger graphic organizer is not only an insult to a paragraph, but is also such an insult to a hamburger”.

4 Battles Literacy Educators have to Fight

  1. Economy – Curriculum as Hoarding (add, add , add & nothing is deleted)
  2. Louise Rosenblatt – Model of Reading – Literacy as Transaction
  3. The battle for writing. Writing should not be colonized by reading.Literary analysis 795,000 fanfiction pieces about Harry Potter
  4. Battle for choice- Carnegie – “public library”  Teachers will need to make it free!

    Questions to Ask when you Write

Screenshot 2018-11-18 at 6.19.58 AM


When Phonics is the Foundation – in a Curriculum of Authentic, Deep Literacy

Lucy Calkins,  Rachel Rothman-Perkins and Rebecca Cronin

Screenshot 2018-11-18 at 6.20.50 AM

Rebecca, Rachel, Lucy and Mabel

“To teach well is to rally your people with heart and soul to learn with courage and enthusiasm. Fear:  Is this curriculum going to cover everything?  Mastery? Proven? Everything? Fear-driven anxious place is far too common with NO place in child’s emergent literacy. Voice is the single quality that matters most. Voice matters for teaching, and learning (as well as writing). To teach phonics well, imagine yourself at kitchen table talking to someone right there with you. Teaching phonics is leading and teaching. “

“That sense of connectedness matters tremendously.  Connecting matters. Connecting to reading and writing. TRANSFER – only reason to teach phonics for reading and writing. TEACHING kids identity. Language is a joyful world!”


And because this is not an “All About” post since I promised “snippets” I will write later about the fabulous session from Colleen Cruz, Kassandra Minor, and Cornelius Minor.


Screenshot 2018-11-05 at 11.27.25 PM

 

 

Advertisements

#TCRWP 95th Saturday Reunion


Sad

sad

sad

sad

sad

Still not out of my system, but moving on!

A search of my own blog posts showed that I attended the 88th, 89th, and 90th in a row.

Fall Saturdays are so problematic with so many events.

Last week’s issues with Hurricane Michael and flights was an unexpected glitch.

Whether it’s your first or too many to count . . .

Enjoy!

Find the fun!

Find something new!

Don’t just stick

With the tried and true!

Find an online friend

Say hello face to face

Say hello to strangers

Make new friends as you race

From session to session

Learning at a speed of light pace.

No one

Does it better.

50 minutes

of learning.

Encapsulated

In Connections,

Teaching Points,

Teaching,

Active Engagement,

And a link.

Units of Study

Writing

Reading

Phonics

and new best friends Rashid and Mabel.

Riverside Church

Kate DiCamillo

TCRWP Staff Developers

Teachers, Administrators, and Authors

by the droves . . .

Enjoy!  Learn!  Enjoy!  Laugh!  Enjoy!  Make New Friends!

Screenshot 2018-10-19 at 2.34.40 PM.png

teachers college

 

#SOL18: Hello, friends!


Literacy is important.  It’s been a part of my life for years.  Teaching, modeling, teaching, modeling, demonstrating!  And yesterday was no different,

EXCEPT

I was a learner in the audience.  A learner.

Here’s just a window into the learning:

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 1.41.58 PM

If you are on twitter, you may know where I was and who I was with for my learning fun. but if you were not online, think about these quotes.

What surprises you?

What is worth talking about?

What would you say to a thought partner?

What would you write?

Instruction needs to change.  Students need to be engaged.  That doesn’t mean teachers need to do “a song and a dance” every day.  But teachers do need to think about the needs of their students.  And how students’ needs and teachers’ needs can both be met in better ways. Responsive teaching is hard.  It means that the data from today drives the instruction for tomorrow. That data comes from a variety of sources:  conferences, book talks, flipgrid responses, book check ins, student goals, teacher goals, the questions students ask, the questions students do NOT ask, student writing, and teacher writing.

It’s not a unit per quarter.  It’s not a whole class novel per quarter.  It’s not low level responses.  It’s not fake reading. It’s not giving up accountability.  It’s not about abdicating responsibility for learning.

It’s also not easy.

Teachers are change agents

Teachers change the world.

What was the message?

Here is a quick glimpse . . .

 

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.36.17 PM

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.36.47 PM

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.47.20 PM

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.48.42 PM

Who were these masterminds of change?

Screenshot 2018-10-01 at 8.46.42 PM

In West Des Moines, Iowa

About 340 of us . . .

Engaged

Empowered

 Great learning!




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum from Two Writing Teachers. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                              slice of life 2016

Additional Resources:

Literacy Lenses:  Link

180 Days

Sample Chapter

Heinemann podcast 1

Heinemann podcast 2

Facebook page

Podcast part 1 – Read Aloud

Resourceful – Planning

Travis Crowder Review

Kelly Gallagher website

Penny Kittle website

#SOL18: Why?


My #OLW stood me in great steed this weekend at #ILA18.Screenshot 2018-07-23 at 11.14.01 PM

So much to see . . .

So much to do . . .

So much to learn . . .



But What’s the Point?



Back in the Dark Ages,

In the late 2oth Century!

I remember the value placed on

Whole-Part-Whole in education.

The goal was always LEARNING!

The intent was for ALL to be LEARNING!

Students

Teachers

ALL!



After #ILA18 I feel that many empowered teachers have been set free in the universe to “change the world” and continue learning.  We haven’t learned it all.  There is a real need to continue to grow and build our knowledge base.

And that brings me to one of my Sunday sessions.   We were learning about the Handbook of Research on Teaching the English Language Arts (4th edition) under the leadership of Diane Lapp and Douglas Fisher. It has 18 chapters.  Chapters that could be used in schools for professional development.

18 Must Reads.

18 Invitational Conversations.

Exploring the tight connections between research and best supported practice that promotes literacy for every learner.

This was not a book available to purchase in the Exhibit Hall.

Screenshot 2018-07-23 at 6.02.34 AM



But could it?  Dare it be a lens to consider best practices?  A lens to consider What?  How?  or even WHY we do what we do in instruction?

In its entirety this is one side of a handout from a round table at that session . . .

Chapter 16

20180723_234838

8 Essential Components of Comprehensive Language Arts Instruction.

Any surprises for you?



As I reviewed the list, I found it quite interesting that this list of components included nine, or exactly half of the chapters.  Curiosity, of course, won out.  What on earth could the other nine chapters be about if this is “the list of components for instruction” and if THIS is the book for teachers to study.

So I was off researching.

In a classroom, I would have been in major trouble because I was on my computer and might have appeared to NOT be on task.  But I was in search of more information.  What is the other half of this book about?  This book we should study?  This book we should use? This 499 page book!



This post is titled “Why?” not to just allow me to pose my own questions but also to perhaps begin to develop some of my own theories.  Why these eight components?  Why do two of the eight (25%) not have chapter resources supporting them?

WHY? 

What are the “Whys?” that are circling in your brain?



What format will the chapter take?

Will there be recommendations of “amounts of time” per component?

Will there be “recommendations of additional resources”?

Were any teachers involved in updating this handbook?

Is there any support for how to put these 8 components into action?

Or how to “know” when the components are all aligned?



Will this text continue to treat each component as a separate silo?  What about the reciprocity of reading and writing? How will we grow readers and writers?

Why this text now? 

What’s so compelling about this text, right now, that this book should be a part of a district’s professional development?

It was a pleasure to hear much rich conversation around real reading and writing at #ILA18.  Real, rich, robust reading that is NOT about single standard instruction or assessment.  It’s actually quite refreshing to go back to the “Whole” of language arts instruction in reading, writing, speaking and listening that moves stedents to take action in the real world.

Doing school must end.  It’s time to capitalize on any instruction that promotes high learning and engagement that challenges students without mind-numbing page after page of annotation, Cornell notes,  and skills-based minute particles that can easily be googled.  Why do adults think these decisions can be made without broader input from our communities?

If the whole is our entire language arts program

and the part is the eight components,

what “WHY?s” will you need answered before you can implement these 8 components?




Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Kelsey, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here.                                                                                                      slice of life 2016

 

#SOL17: Wondering


Do you believe this?  What’s the evidence of your belief?

every.PNG

Doug Fisher, SDSU, August

Just Wondering . . .

How much “LEARNING” do you engage in during a year?

I learn daily as I read and write.

No one says “I have to”.

No one pays me for my time.

I learn weekly in Twitter chats.

No one says “I have to”.

No one pays me for my time.

I learn weekly as I blog.

No one says “I have to”.

No one pays me for my time.

I learn weekly in my Voxer groups.

No one says “I have to”.

No one pays me for my time.

I learn monthly, semi-annually and even annually from some major events.

Last week led me to learning in Davenport, IA on Monday with Dr. Mary Howard and

in Des Moines, IA on Thursday with Lucy Calkins.

Passionate speakers sharing research-based ideas.

Tirelessly

Leading

Encouraging

Thoughtful

Implementation of Best Practices in Literacy Instruction and

Assessment.

In three weeks I will be at #NCTE17.

No one says “I have to”.

No one pays me for my time.

I’m “retired” from a full-time job and yet since retirement, I have engaged in

15 days

of professional learning of my choice!

No one says “I have to”.

No one pays me for my time.

That does not include book clubs (6 this year).

That does not include Twitter chats (often 2 per week).

That does not include reading . . .

That does not include writing . . .

WHY?

Learning is growing.

Learning is addictive.

Learning is necessary . . . breathe in, breathe out, read, write!

Living a learning life!

What does your learning life look like?




slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Deb, Kathleen, Lanny, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum and the #SOLSC that runs from March 1 to the 31st. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 




What is the Bill of Rights for Writers according to Lucy Calkins?

Link

#DigiLitSunday: Better


better

Today’s call for slices from Margaret Simon at Reflections on the Teche immediately makes me think of HOW one gets better.  Previous posts about professional development are here, here, and here. I love learning.  I love learning with friends.  Therefore, one of the best tools that I use for professional development is Twitter because it truly is exemplified by this graphic.

good better best

What?

Learning.  Identifying a topic. Identifying a need.  Finding experts. Reading. Writing. Talking. Learning Together.  There are many ways to “Better Oneself” and one of the fastest routes is through TWITTER!

Start the Challenge

If you’re on Facebook, go to this post of Mary C Howard’s (author of Good to Great) for her Twitter 5-3-1 Challenge.

“TWITTER 5-3-1 CHALLENGE:
So I’m posing a summer challenge that will take very little time.

5: FOLLOW
Follow five people you admire. Just find them on Twitter and click the follow button on the far top right of their page.

3: RETWEET/LIKE
Retweet or like three comments that inspired you. Just click on the comment and then the up/down arrows at the bottom middle and hit retweet (or like with the heart at the bottom).

1: Reply
Make one comment to a tweet every day (even “Thank you.”) Just click on the left arrow at the bottom right and type.

I promise you that my 5-3-1 challenge will enrich you beyond measure this summer. Twitter is a treasure chest of inspiration, ideas, articles, posts, and dedication. If you’re not using it even to a small degree, you’re cheating yourself. This summer is a great time to dip your toe in the Twitter pool. I promise you that you’ll be grateful you did!”

My only addition is to make it the 5 -3 – 1 – 1 Challenge.

The final 1 – Find a chat

Weekly chats might be #TCRWP on Wednesdays or #G2Great on Thursdays.  Monthly chats might be #TitleTalk on the last Sunday of the month.  Additional chats like #TWTBlog may be scheduled after a series of blog posts.

Why a Twitter Chat?

A Twitter Chat will give you an opportunity to “rub elbows” with the experts and grow your own knowledge base as well as your PLN.  You will be amazed at the authors who are available to learn from as well as the inspiration, ideas, articles, and posts that Mary refers to above.

You are at the crossroad.  You must make the decision.

How will you better yourself?

good better

#SOL16: Quiet Anticipation


anticipation

Excited and thinking the best,

Anticipating

Friends .  .  .

Fellow Twitter Friends

Fellow Voxer Friends

Fellow Bloggers

Fellow #NCTE14 and #NCTE15 attendees

The shiny ball is going to drop on #NCTE16 and I can’t wait!

Professional Development is an “investment in yourself” – Check out this blog post from #NCTE15! Continual growth matters!

Learning

Listening

Learning

Eyes wide open

Learning

Within a cocoon of friendship

Learning

Around every corner

Learning

At every session

Learning

In Atlanta!

Looking forward to meeting up, face to face, with “Slicers” Saturday night.

Will you be there?

slice of life

Thank you, Betsy, Beth, Dana, Deb, Kathleen, Lisa, Melanie, and Stacey for this weekly forum. Check out the writers, readers and teachers here. 

What have I learned from #NCTE in the past?

#NCTE 14 (First Timer Report) here,  (Community, Collaboration & Social Justice) here,  (Our presentation – Story as the Landscape of Knowing) here,  (Top 10 Quotes I Have Used from #NCTE14) here and (Close Reading and the Little Ones – Chris Lehman, Kate Roberts and Kristi Mraz) here.

#NCTE15 (Vicki Vinton & Katie Wood Ray) here, (Kelly Gallagher’s Top 10) here, (Sessions – Colleen Cruz, Jennifer Serravallo, Clare & Tammy, #G2Great) here and  (Involving Students – 2 #tcrwp sessions, Kylene Beers, Bob Probst, Donalyn Miller, Seymour Simon, Linda Hoyt, Kelly Boswell and more) here.

And how do you reflect and review your learning?

How do you know you are growing?

#DigiLitSunday: #WhyIWrite


#why i write.jpg

Why do I write?

I started a list

The verbs wrote themselves . . .

To define

To think

To create

To share

To craft

To dream

To plan a course of action

To question

To examine

To reflect

Current reality . . . 

I am writing now

Because my fingers are tethered to my keyboard

And I can’t leave this post until I’ve recorded something

Worthy of pushing that “publish” button.

What do I write?

Serious or trivial?

Rich in details?

Or written totally between the lines?

Do the words tumble end over end

in their urgency to be revealed?

Or do they have to be coaxed out of hiding

while I patiently sip coffee as they emerge word by word on the scrren?

The pacing corresponds to the ideas,

some race across the blank screen begging for release,

some yet to simmer,

some seem half-baked,

some to be totally erased TODAY,

perhaps to emerge in a different format on another day.

YET

Today

The words are in gratitude for time with family

This weekend it was being entertained by the 17 month old grandson,

A charming, sweet boy

Attending his first collegiate football game

Complete with high fives, fist bumps, applause, and signaling touchdowns

And yet I wonder what he is thinking . . .

Today I write to share my thanks for the precious gift of time with family!

Why do you write?

What do you write?


Additional Reading

Other thoughts on #WhyIWrite here in a previous post complete with responses from MANY slicers!

Shaelynn Farnsworth’s post “Educators Sharing #WhyIWrite to Celebrate National Writing Day”

Kathleen Sokolowski’s post “Are You Ready for the National Day of Writing 2016?”

#TCRWP Reading Begins Today


On the schedule for today:

Registration

Keynote

Lucy Calkins @ Riverside Church

A Call to Action

AM  Advanced

Amanda Hartman

Rev Up Your Teaching Muscles to Make Your Whole Group Instruction as Potent as Possible (Mini-lessons, Shared Reading, Read Aloud) (K-2)

PM Advanced

Kathleen Tolan

Beyond Guided Reading: Expanding Your Repertoire of Small Group Work in Nonfiction (3-8)

Choice Session

???

So many great sessions to choose from with staff developers:

Kathleen Tolan

Cheryl Tyler

Kathy Collins

Jen DeSutter

Shanna Schwartz

Lindsay Barton

Brooke Geller

Jennifer Kean-Thompson

Natalie Louis

Pablo Wolfe

Audra Robb

Lucy Calkins

Shana Frazin

Katie Wears

Molly Picardi

Keynotes for the remainder of the week:

Matt De la Pena, Donalyn Miller, Freddy Hiebert, and Natalie Louis!

It’s Monday, June 27th!

So blessed to be learning for a second week at #tcrwp.

However, it’s 2:00 in the morning!

First-day excitement!

I can still sleep for hours and hours!

Anticipation!

Way toooooo early!

Post a blog!

Back to sleep!

Dreaming of life and learning in NYC!

NYC two

What will you be learning today?  

Will you be following the Booth Bay tweets?  #bblit16  

Or #ISTE16?  Or #NOTatISTE16?

What’s on your learning plan?

 

#ILA15 Begins Tomorrow!!!


IRA now ILA = International Literacy Association

I’ve skipped over this paragraph in the ILA materials (probably 100 times now), but please slow down and read it . . .

“Illiteracy is a solvable problem, and together, we can make a difference! Amplify your efforts by joining forces with us at ILA 2015 in St. Louis, where you’ll get information and inspiration to transform your students’ lives. Register now for this can’t-miss event, where you’ll experience endless opportunities to network and learn—and leave feeling part of a meaningful movement, resolved to end illiteracy.”

And this . . .

“Literacy—across all sectors, mediums, and channels—is increasingly critical. In order to effectively prepare children and adults for the future, teachers must be well prepared to help diverse students improve their literacy skills.”

Whether illiteracy or aliteracy is a concern for you, follow the twitter stream on #ILA15 to LEARN from July 17 pre-conferences to the sessions on July 18-20 in St. Louis!  Who defines well-prepared?  Are your current efforts REALLY working for ALL your students?

#Amplify

#TogetherBetter

What are you learning this summer that will improve student literacy?

How will you use your learning?

How will you share your learning?

Mrs. Palmer Ponders

Noticing and celebrating life's moments of any size.

doctorsam7

Seeking Ways to Grow Proficient, Motivated, Lifelong Readers & Writers

Doing The Work That Matters

a journey of growing readers & writers

Present Perfect

adventures in multiple tenses

Leadership Connection

from Great Prairie AEA

The Blue Heron (Then Sings My Soul)

The oft bemused (or quite simply amused) musings of Krista Marx -- a self-professed HOPE pursuing Pollyanna

Middle English

Life as an English teacher leader

steps in the literacy journey

Walking the Path to Literacy Together

arjeha

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Resource - Full

Sharing Ideas, Strategies and Tools

Joel Pedersen

be that #oneperson

adventuresinstaffdevelopment

All Things Literacy! Brianna Parlitsis

TWO WRITING TEACHERS

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers.

elsie tries writing

"The problem with people is they forget that that most of the time it's the small things that count." (Said by Finch in All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. These are my small things that count.

I Haven't Learned That Yet

This blog serves to document my path of learning and teaching.

Simply Inspired Teaching

A blog by Kari Yates

Reflections on Leadership and Learning

Sharing my learning experiences

AnnaGCockerille Literacy

The Generative Power of Language: Building Literacy Skills One Word at a Time

Reading to the Core

Just another WordPress.com site

Karen Gluskin

My Teaching Experiences and Qualifications

To Read To Write To Be

Thoughts on learning and teaching