#SOL21: Poetry Revisited

Who knew? Our 9th grade class published a student poetry anthology with a front cover, back cover and pages of ditto-copied poetry fading in between.

On page 5 my poem sits. My inked signature, scrawled across the words, lines barely discernible, requires repetition to be read with any accuracy, and even then does it make as much sense as when it was written. What’s my take on poetry? Remember these models: I Hate Poetry. I Love Poetry. (LINK)

To Wear or Not to Wear

(Formatted . . . )

  • – – – – – – – – – –

I do remember using this format in a high school writing class to pen the most eloquent . . .

To Write or Not to Write

I was a firm believer in imitation.

Poetry: I can take it or leave it (Link)

What’s your take on poetry?

Necessary?

A frill?

A Luxury?

Why?

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Screenshot 2019-01-29 at 3.12.16 AM.png

GRRR

Formatting

8 responses

  1. I use poetry as the base (not the fluff) of my teaching. Some people call me the poetry teacher. I have a strong belief that my students are better writers because we read and write poetry every day. Some day I may write the book in my head.

    1. Do write your book, Margaret. Your poetry is gorgeous. I remember so much over focus on “rhyme” that the message of poetry often seemed to be lost. You make it so possible! ❤

  2. I often used poetry with students who needed help with fluency. As a kid I really wasn’t wild about poetry, but as I aged I learned to appreciate it. I think that teaching poetry to students gives them one more way to express themselves.

    1. Some teachers killed poetry.
      I hated poetry when it was all about the meter, the rhyme and meaning be damned. It was not sustainable.

  3. I so enjoyed having a glimpse into the writing mind of Fran, the 9th grader! I like approaching poetry by meeting the poet and immersing myself in all their poems. I think this is why I LOVE it when TCRWP has a poet as a keynote (Georgia Heard and Naomi Shihab Nye and Nikki Grimes and Jason Reynolds and the Knock, Knock performance poet).

    1. I remember free verse in high school. No rhyming requirements seemed to be easier.

      Poetry should be a part of every content unit. More opportunities to fly!

  4. Fran, I so enjoyed your poem from a time gone by! My favorite line is, “Who has the right to hold the answer key?” I “Mmhmmed” right then and there. Reminds me of recent conversations I’ve had with my pre-teen daughter over the inequities of dress code rules and violations. Thanks for sharing with us!

    1. Thanks, Mallory.
      Yes, who makes those decisions?

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